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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
The Carroll County Farm Museum might raise its adult general admission, after four years of bad weather dampened attendance at its primary money-maker, the Maryland Wine Festival. The festival accounts for more than 70 percent of the museum's income, administrator Dottie Freeman told members of the museum board and two county commissioners yesterday. They discussed raising the walk-in admission from $3 to $5, the first increase in more than five years. That's lower than many local attractions, the commissioners and members at the meeting said, although some suggested that the money-making vendors pick up more of the cost.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | November 14, 2013
Shorter daylight, fresh cooler breezes off the Bay and the comings of the fall and winter and a New Year bring me pause for reflection on our Maritime Museum. In the face of personnel loss, a recovering economy and tight money, your museum board, our volunteers, our funding governments, foundations, corporations, members, visitors and individual donors are helping us to realize many of the dreams and aspirations of the founders and first supporters of the museum. On behalf of the Board of Directors, I thank you for your faith in our ability to inform the public about our maritime heritage, and to present innovative educational and entertainment programs.
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NEWS
July 11, 1994
The Babe Ruth Museum, which is planning to create an $8 million baseball center inside historic Camden Station, has asked the Maryland Stadium Authority for additional time to complete its plans.The museum board was to have presented a financial plan and design by June 15 for reusing the state-owned train station, which is next to Oriole Park at Camden Yards and dates from the 1850s. Just before the deadline, the board requested an eight-month extension of its negotiating agreement.At a stadium authority meeting last week, the authority took no action on the request.
EXPLORE
By Mary K. Tilghman | November 13, 2012
Friends and descendants of Benjamin Banneker gathered Nov. 10 to mark the 281st birthday of the famed African-American astronomer and mathematician who is also known for his work surveying the land that eventually became Washington, D.C. But this time the focus of the annual celebration at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum in Oella wasn't on the colonial-era African-American scientist and farmer. The honoree at Saturday's celebration was his grandmother, Molly Bannaky.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
The Carroll County Farm Museum might raise its adult general admission, after four years of bad weather dampened attendance at its primary money-maker, the Maryland Wine Festival. The festival accounts for more than 70 percent of the museum's income, administrator Dottie Freeman told members of the museum board and two county commissioners yesterday. They discussed raising the walk-in admission from $3 to $5, the first increase in more than five years. That's lower than many local attractions, the commissioners and members at the meeting said, although some suggested that the money-making vendors pick up more of the cost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | August 31, 2003
Maryland State Fair There were adventures inside and outside at the Maryland State Fair's Opening Night Party. Folks could enjoy rides and games on the midway then take refuge from the sultry summer air inside the Fair's administration building. Families regrouped and refueled at a buffet of carved turkey and London broil, chicken tenders, fruit and cookies. And guests could learn a little about Maryland, too. Poster board displays about 21 Maryland counties decorated the party room. The displays were created by 4-H members in the counties.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
The board formed to create a new home for the Cloisters children's museum near the Inner Harbor is searching for consultants to recommend the best way to carry out the project.The museum board has set Feb. 1 as the deadline for marketing and design experts and others to submit their qualifications to conduct a three-month study of The Brokerage at the Inner Harbor, where the museum is to be located.According to museum Director Beatrice Taylor, the board's goal is to determine how to recycle portions of the retail space inside the Brokerage, at 34 Market Place, to create a "first-rate museum and children's center" by early 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | September 10, 2000
Touchdown for United Way It's one thing to be sitting and eating, watching your favorite Ravens' football players on TV at home. It's quite another to be sitting and eating with your favorite Ravens' players in the Baltimore Convention Center. But that's what some 800 local football fans got to do at the United Way of Central Maryland's 2000 Community Campaign Kickoff Lunch. As head coach Brian Billick introduced the team's coaches and players, each was escorted by a cheerleader to a table to share lunch with his fans.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | March 13, 1994
FREDERICK -- The former executive director of restoration at Maryland's historic 17th-century settlement, St. Mary's City, has been chosen to head a new museum here devoted to 19th-century medicine.Burton K. Kummerow, chief of interpretation and exhibits for the Maryland Historic Trust, will be executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, which is to open in downtown Frederick in late 1995 or early 1996.Mr. Kummerow, 53, who for several years was executive director of the Historic St. Mary's City Commission -- the government-funded keeper of the state's oldest Colonial village -- was chosen from a national field of about 100 candidates, said John E. Olson, a museum board member.
FEATURES
June 5, 2005
The five-story, $33 million Reginald F. Lewis Museum at 830 Pratt St. (scheduled to open June 25) is a boldly modern structure that makes good use of a tight but prominent site near Baltimore's Inner Harbor . The design doesn't make literal references to African architecture. The architects used bold geometry and vibrant colors to indicate that it's a museum and that it's about Maryland and about diversity. They chose the colors of the state flag - red, white, black and yellow - which are also colors of skin.
EXPLORE
RECORD EDITORIAL | July 11, 2012
It's most likely that outside of the circle that once held the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum and the Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School, folks will never know what really happened to the decade-long partnership that was severed last month. Nor does it matter. What does matter is that what looked like, at least from a distance, had been a vibrant part of the museum is no longer. The official reason given was "the Boat school was not providing necessary support to the mission of the Museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Ursula N. McCracken, former director of the Textile Museum in Washington who earlier had been director of development at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died Monday of brain cancer at her West University Parkway home. She was 66. Ursula Naylor Eland was born in New York City, and raised in England and Stamford, Conn. She earned a bachelor's degree in the history of art from Wellesley College in 1963 and received two master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University. Mrs. McCracken received a master's degree in the history of ideas in 1984 and, two years later, a master's in administrative sciences, or nonprofit management.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
The Carroll County Farm Museum is 140 acres of agricultural history, with many buildings that offer exhibits detailing farm life from the latter half of the 1800s through the early 20th century. But there is a flip side to the museum that visitors to a seasonal festival or other special event probably don't think about: It is a year-round business, educational center and community-oriented facility. "You've got to be more than a museum," said Dottie Freeman, executive director. "You've got to make sure the first visit will be an enticement for a second visit - you have to have new venues for visitors to enjoy."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | June 23, 2005
The Baltimore Museum of Art would add more than 100,000 square feet of space over the next 20 years under a comprehensive expansion plan that would increase gallery and storage areas, reopen the historic main entrance and cover the open-air Schaefer Court with a glass roof. The plan calls for the museum to reinstall its collections and expand its library, gift shop, restaurant, auditorium and study facilities. It would gain 50 parking spaces in an underground garage that the Johns Hopkins University plans to build next door, and create a new north entrance to link the museum and the university.
FEATURES
June 5, 2005
The five-story, $33 million Reginald F. Lewis Museum at 830 Pratt St. (scheduled to open June 25) is a boldly modern structure that makes good use of a tight but prominent site near Baltimore's Inner Harbor . The design doesn't make literal references to African architecture. The architects used bold geometry and vibrant colors to indicate that it's a museum and that it's about Maryland and about diversity. They chose the colors of the state flag - red, white, black and yellow - which are also colors of skin.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
The Carroll County Farm Museum might raise its adult general admission, after four years of bad weather dampened attendance at its primary money-maker, the Maryland Wine Festival. The festival accounts for more than 70 percent of the museum's income, administrator Dottie Freeman told members of the museum board and two county commissioners yesterday. They discussed raising the walk-in admission from $3 to $5, the first increase in more than five years. That's lower than many local attractions, the commissioners and members at the meeting said, although some suggested that the money-making vendors pick up more of the cost.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | February 11, 1996
HOW WOULD YOU expect to celebrate someone's 101st birthday? These days, it would probably be anywhere other than a smoke-filled room, unless of course you were celebrating the 101st of baseball legend Babe Ruth, who happened to be a famous cigar smoker.And what better place for such a party than at Ruth's Chris Steak House, where last Monday evening they opened their doors for only well-heeled guests who bought $200 tickets to attend a black-tie gala fund-raiser for the Babe Ruth Museum's new Camden Station Museum.
EXPLORE
RECORD EDITORIAL | July 11, 2012
It's most likely that outside of the circle that once held the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum and the Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders School, folks will never know what really happened to the decade-long partnership that was severed last month. Nor does it matter. What does matter is that what looked like, at least from a distance, had been a vibrant part of the museum is no longer. The official reason given was "the Boat school was not providing necessary support to the mission of the Museum.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
The Carroll County Farm Museum might raise its adult general admission, after four years of bad weather dampened attendance at its primary money-maker, the Maryland Wine Festival. The festival accounts for more than 70 percent of the museum's income, administrator Dottie Freeman told members of the museum board and two county commissioners yesterday. They discussed raising the walk-in admission from $3 to $5, the first increase in more than five years. That's lower than many local attractions, the commissioners and members at the meeting said, although some suggested that the money-making vendors pick up more of the cost.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 4, 2004
If museum director Gary Vikan had any inkling of the surprise in store for him at this year's annual dinner for the Walters Art Museum board of trustees, he certainly didn't show it. The festive event, held recently in the marbled sculpture gallery of the Walters' elegant 1904 building, seemed to be drawing to a close when Vikan approached the podium to deliver a few remarks and introduce board president Bill Paternotte after desert was served. "This year we've decided to add a little twist," Paternotte began.
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