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By Karin Remesch | July 26, 1998
Mission: To preserve and demonstrate the rural arts and crafts of the 1880-1920 period through educational programs and tours of the museum site, a once-working Harford County farm near the banks of the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace. The turn-of-the-century farmhouse includes a formal sitting room and a kitchen with a wood-burning stove and icebox. The nearby shops and barn feature craft demonstrations and numerous displays, including tools, milking machines, spinning wheels and looms, as well as carriages, sleighs and other horse-drawn vehicles.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
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NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
If you long to read copies of old, hard-to-find Jet magazines, or to admire a stamp collection featuring black Americans, visit today's open house at the Howard County Center of African-American Culture in Town Center.The open house, marking the museum's official reopening, takes place from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the 1,900-square-foot museum at One Commerce Center.Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.In October, the museum moved from 10 Corporate Center, near the American Cafe, to nearby One Commerce Center, because it didn't have enough money to stay in the previous location, said Wylene Burch, the museum's founder and director.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
NEWS
April 27, 1991
When the new Orioles stadium at Camden Yards is inaugurated next year, Babe Ruth's birthplace will be only a fly-ball away. A museum consisting of four row houses has operated at 212-218 Emory Street since 1974, commemorating the great slugger's roots in Baltimore and his career with the New York Yankees.As exhibits have increased and word has gotten around about the museum, the number of visitors has zoomed. Close to 35,000 fans paid homage to the Babe last year. That number is likely to triple at the very least when the Orioles move to the new downtown ballpark.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 9, 1991
THE NATIONAL Endowment of the Arts has eliminated five established arts endowment grant programs, including one that specifically provides money for museums to purchase the work of living American artists.Museum directors across the country and working artists say that the museum-purchase program had, in fits and starts over the last 20 years, become one of the most important mechanisms by which predominantly emerging artists reached the crucial plateau of making their first sales to legitimate museum collections.
NEWS
March 25, 1994
It may never be known for sure whether the Colony 7 Motel off the Baltimore-Washington Parkway was ever used by spies trying to eavesdrop on the nearby National Security Agency.But the super-secret code-breaking agency apparently thought it was possible. A couple of years ago it used some taxpayers' money to buy the motel and erase a possible security risk.The motel complex, located on Route 32, has now been reopened as the National Cryptological Museum. While NSA itself remains shrouded in mystery, the museum chronicles the historical development of codes from the Middle Ages to a recent Cray high-speed computer that contained no fewer than 45 miles of wires.
NEWS
By Michael Fletcher | January 31, 1991
In the arts community, they sometimes jokingly refer to Black History Month as "black hysterical month," because of the mad scramble to find black art and presenters to be part of the annual celebration.But at the Baltimore Museum of Art, officials expend a lot of energy to avoid the annual February rush."At our museum at least, focusing on the African-American community's history and origins is not isolated to Black History Month," says Brenda Richardson, BMA's deputy director for art. "We try to have events celebrating black culture throughout the year."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 19, 2004
To celebrate its grand opening, the National Museum of the American Indian is throwing a six-day First Americans Festival, which begins Tuesday. Highlights of the festival, which will be held on the National Mall, include: Native Nations Procession: Composed of nearly 20,000 Native Americans in traditional dress, the walk begins at the Smithsonian Castle at 9:30 a.m. and culminates at noon with an hour-long dedication ceremony held outside the new museum....
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 29, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Catch a wave that really cranks, one that is powerful and fast, and you're shredding. Challenge one that breaks precariously close to shore, and it's hairball. And fall in dramatic fashion, and you've had a flaming wipeout.This is the vocabulary of surfers, who embrace the sea air, brave the chilly waters and dive into their favorite activity along the Southern California coast and other surfing hot spots across the globe.It is also the type of talk that can be overheard at the Huntington Beach International Surfing Museum.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
The Perryville Farmers Market is open every Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. at the corner of Broad Street and Roundhouse Drive in Lower Ferry Park; vendors are selling produce, crafts, baked goods and other wares. The Perryville Railroad Museum is open every Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Condolences are extended to the family of Margaret Cifaldo on her passing. The Perryville Fire Company will hold its fourth Sunday of the month all you can eat breakfast on Aug. 24. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. and the event runs through 11:30 a.m. Call 410-920-5079.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Around the dawn of the 6th century, the philosopher Boethius noted that "music is part of us, and either ennobles or degrades our behavior. " It's still hard to argue with him. In the centuries after Boethius, artists illuminated music's benefits and potential pitfalls in remarkable ways, producing the sorts of works that form an intimate new exhibit at the Walters Art Museum. "Seeing Music in Medieval Manuscripts," which will be on display into mid-October, was curated by Chiara Valle, the Zanvyl Krieger Fellow in the Department of Manuscripts and Rare Books at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Police officials marked the formal grand opening Friday of the Howard County Police Museum. The museum, located inside the Howard County Welcome Center on Main Street in Ellicott City, includes exhibits on fallen officers, vintage uniforms, past chiefs of police and antique weapons. "We need to capture the history of this agency," said Howard County Police Chief William McMahon, who is retiring from the top job next week. Retired Howard County Sergeant Larry Corum, who was heavily involved in the project, said the museum shows how far the department has come over the course of its 61-year history.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Steven S. Hsiao, a Johns Hopkins scientist who studied how the brain perceives the shape, size and texture of three-dimensional objects, died of lung cancer June 16 at Hopkins Hospital. The Mount Washington resident was 59. "Steve has been a defining part of Hopkins brain science for over three decades," said Ed Connor, a professor of neuroscience and director of the Johns Hopkins University's Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. Hopkins colleagues said Dr. Hsiao's worked in basic science involving the brain, leading to advancements in complex information processing.
NEWS
October 15, 1994
Sometimes things work out just right, such as the Maryland Historical Society's announcement that it will expand into the former Greyhound Corp. garage at Centre Street and Park Avenue.The fate of the 19,000-square-foot garage has been the topic of ** intense speculation after the rest of the old bus station complex was restored two years ago. A good opportunity arose to get rid of the bus shed altogether after a February 1993 storm collapsed its roof. But the relic won a reprieve."We are hoping that we can begin work on that building within six to eight months and hopefully be occupying it in some way in 18 months," historical society director Dennis Fiori said after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke recently decided that the garage will be used for museum expansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
It will be business as usual Friday at the Walters Art Museum. The facility closed its doors unexpectedly on Thursday morning after water that seeped in from the overnight storm posed a safety threat to the electrical system. Visitors who were on a tour had to depart prematurely. A BGE crew finished up its work Thursday afternoon and gave the all-clear for the museum to reopen Friday morning. 
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The storm overnight in Baltimore brought water into the basement of the Walters Art Museum. The water -  and the resulting electrical issues - forced the venue to close to visitors Thursday morning. Here is the statement from the museum: Due to storm water and electrical issues affecting the Centre Street building of the Walters Art Museum, the museum will be closing to visitors by 11 a.m. Baltimore City and BGE workers are on the way to the museum to assess the severity of the situation.
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