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By Karin Remesch | July 26, 1998
Mission: To preserve and demonstrate the rural arts and crafts of the 1880-1920 period through educational programs and tours of the museum site, a once-working Harford County farm near the banks of the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace. The turn-of-the-century farmhouse includes a formal sitting room and a kitchen with a wood-burning stove and icebox. The nearby shops and barn feature craft demonstrations and numerous displays, including tools, milking machines, spinning wheels and looms, as well as carriages, sleighs and other horse-drawn vehicles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Nine Baltimore arts groups, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Artscape, have received a total of nearly $2.53 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grants, announced Wednesday, included $100,000 for the BSO, $80,000 for the BMA and $45,000 for Artscape, Baltimore's free annual arts festival, which is scheduled this year for July 18-20. "These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation's artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape," said NEA acting chairwoman Joan Shigekawa.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Charlie "Fruit Man" McLean has been "a-rabbing" in Baltimore for more than 40 years, and he still can't think of a better way to spend his time. As a boy, he rode with the men who sold fresh produce in the streets from their brightly colored horse-drawn wagons. He made the job his life's work. Even now, he says, he can get fresh food to people who might otherwise never see it. McLean, 53, is one of only about 10 people still "a-rabbing," as Baltimoreans have long called his line of work.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Robert Lenox Dwight, a retired engineer who founded the National Electronics Museum and was active in the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Cylburn Arboretum, died of pneumonia March 22 at Baywoods of Annapolis. He was 91 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in New York City, he was the son of Maitland Dwight, an attorney, and Lydia Butler Dwight, a homemaker. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he entered Princeton University in 1941. Following Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Navy and entered its V-12 education program.
NEWS
March 25, 1994
It may never be known for sure whether the Colony 7 Motel off the Baltimore-Washington Parkway was ever used by spies trying to eavesdrop on the nearby National Security Agency. But the super-secret code-breaking agency apparently thought it was possible. A couple of years ago, it used some taxpayers' money to buy the motel and erase a possible security risk.The motel complex, located on Route 32 in Anne Arundel County, has been reopened as the National Cryptological Museum. While NSA itself remains shrouded in mystery, the museum chronicles the historical development of codes from the Middle Ages to a recent Cray high-speed computer that contained no fewer than 45 miles of wires.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
If you long to read copies of old, hard-to-find Jet magazines, or to admire a stamp collection featuring black Americans, visit today's open house at the Howard County Center of African-American Culture in Town Center.The open house, marking the museum's official reopening, takes place from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the 1,900-square-foot museum at One Commerce Center.Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.In October, the museum moved from 10 Corporate Center, near the American Cafe, to nearby One Commerce Center, because it didn't have enough money to stay in the previous location, said Wylene Burch, the museum's founder and director.
NEWS
April 27, 1991
When the new Orioles stadium at Camden Yards is inaugurated next year, Babe Ruth's birthplace will be only a fly-ball away. A museum consisting of four row houses has operated at 212-218 Emory Street since 1974, commemorating the great slugger's roots in Baltimore and his career with the New York Yankees.As exhibits have increased and word has gotten around about the museum, the number of visitors has zoomed. Close to 35,000 fans paid homage to the Babe last year. That number is likely to triple at the very least when the Orioles move to the new downtown ballpark.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 9, 1991
THE NATIONAL Endowment of the Arts has eliminated five established arts endowment grant programs, including one that specifically provides money for museums to purchase the work of living American artists.Museum directors across the country and working artists say that the museum-purchase program had, in fits and starts over the last 20 years, become one of the most important mechanisms by which predominantly emerging artists reached the crucial plateau of making their first sales to legitimate museum collections.
NEWS
By Michael Fletcher | January 31, 1991
In the arts community, they sometimes jokingly refer to Black History Month as "black hysterical month," because of the mad scramble to find black art and presenters to be part of the annual celebration.But at the Baltimore Museum of Art, officials expend a lot of energy to avoid the annual February rush."At our museum at least, focusing on the African-American community's history and origins is not isolated to Black History Month," says Brenda Richardson, BMA's deputy director for art. "We try to have events celebrating black culture throughout the year."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | September 19, 2004
To celebrate its grand opening, the National Museum of the American Indian is throwing a six-day First Americans Festival, which begins Tuesday. Highlights of the festival, which will be held on the National Mall, include: Native Nations Procession: Composed of nearly 20,000 Native Americans in traditional dress, the walk begins at the Smithsonian Castle at 9:30 a.m. and culminates at noon with an hour-long dedication ceremony held outside the new museum....
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
The leaders of central Maryland's various jurisdictions will haggle and negotiate in the coming months over what regional transportation projects to prioritize over the next two-and-a-half decades — and officials are looking for ideas from the public. The Baltimore Regional Transportation Board must update the region's 25-year transportation priorities every four years, making them eligible for federal funding. "We're looking for long-range, regional thinking, not filling the pothole on your street," said Terry Freeland, senior transportation policy planner at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
In the shadow of Baltimore's City Hall is a 200-year-old building that has been the seat of city government, a school for African-American children and a museum that displayed a mastodon skeleton and the embalmed head of a New Zealand native. Now, a fledgling nonprofit is looking to reinvent the space once again. Organizers want to transform the old Peale Museum into a hub celebrating Baltimore history and architecture with exhibits, a cafe, a lecture hall and office space. But the Peale - closed since 1997 - is in bad shape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
On a crisp spring morning, chef David Thomas stands in the kitchen of his Parkville cafe, Herb & Soul, prepping for a busy day of cooking. Plastic tubs overflow with fresh kale, while shelves hold spices that will impart flavor to the chef's Old Bay Fried Chicken, mac and cheese, and smoked chili-rubbed boneless short ribs with homemade sauce. At first blush, the menu might bring to mind soul food, although Thomas describes his farm-to-table, sustainable fare as Southern fusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
An exhibit on "The Americans," an FX series starring Keri Russell as a Soviet spy living in 1980s America, opened at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. From background on a band of real soviet agents discovered in the U.S. to some of the wigs worn by Russell and her co-star, Matthew Rhys, in the TV series, the exhibit explores the space between social reality and fictional spy narratives. The museum is presenting "The Americans" exhibit through the end of May in conjunction with FX, as "The Americans" continues in its second season as one of cable TV's more popular series.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | April 1, 2014
Your Bank of America credit card will get you free admission this weekend to the  American Visionary Art Museum. It's part of the bank's Museums on Us program, which offers free weekend access to a range of museums on the first full weekend of each month this year. Both Bank of America and Merrill Lynch credit and debit cardholders can get in free at the downtown museum on Key Highway on Saturday and Sunday. The program now has a mobile site that gives a full list of all 150 museums in the program.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | September 29, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Catch a wave that really cranks, one that is powerful and fast, and you're shredding. Challenge one that breaks precariously close to shore, and it's hairball. And fall in dramatic fashion, and you've had a flaming wipeout.This is the vocabulary of surfers, who embrace the sea air, brave the chilly waters and dive into their favorite activity along the Southern California coast and other surfing hot spots across the globe.It is also the type of talk that can be overheard at the Huntington Beach International Surfing Museum.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
A gala of gore attracted a human figure adorned with sharp plastic claws and accompanied by a little fake blood cocktail sauce. Baltimore's Zombie Gras is that kind of event. The fourth annual celebration of creative decomposition and masterful makeup drew hundreds of aficionados Saturday to Geppi's Entertainment Museum. The blood was all fake, and those who spent hours applying it were more than willing to discuss their approach to graveyard glamour in the setting of classic movie posters and treasures of the golden age of horror, imagination and adventure.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
Baltimore County officials, former Negro League Baseball players and fans enjoyed "opening day" a few days early Thursday as the county formally unveiled the Hubert V. Simmons Museum of Negro Leagues Baseball in the Owings Mills branch of the Baltimore County Public Library. At the ceremony, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz honored the late Hubert "Bert" Simmons, who played for the Baltimore Elite Giants in the 1950s and for whom the museum is named. Audrey Simmons, his widow, and Ray Banks, a lifelong friend of Simmons, thanked the county for facilitating the museum in the community - five years after "Bert" Simmons' death and 73 years after he began playing baseball in the Negro Baseball Leagues.
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