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By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 1996
MOSCOW -- Tell a Muscovite that a lot of Maryland school districts closed yesterday morning with less than 2 inches of snow on the ground and he'll laugh as if it's the punch-line to a how-many-Americans-does-it- take-to-screw-in-a-light-bulb joke.In a city where forward progress in any endeavor -- from making a left-hand turn to registering for school -- is notoriously complex, the storied Russian winter is just no big deal.Sub-zero temperatures are actually considered healthier for strolling your infant than temperatures that are "too warm," like 10 degrees.
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NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 21, 2006
MOSCOW -- Summer in Moscow: the season to crowd into flower-filled parks and public squares to soak up every minute of cherished daylight, under the gaze of statues of Russian poets and generals. The season to reveal the pale skin of arms, legs and - when men unbutton their shirts - bellies long hidden under winter clothes. Also, the season to take ice-cold showers. Not, mind you, by choice. Moscow is about two-thirds of the way through its hot water shut-off, an annual annoyance that leaves millions of Russians without the modern convenience of a hot shower for weeks at a time.
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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet citizens who thought they had seen just about everything on their disorienting journey from communism to capitalism saw something else yesterday: Moscow's first advertising gimmick.A Soviet computer company called MMM gave Muscovites a free day on the subway, paying the fare for the Metro's 6 million or more riders and effortlessly reeling in what the high priests of capitalism on Madison Avenue routinely bend over backward for -- a golden supply of free advertising.Enamored radio and television programs broadcast all the details, telling everyone who counts about MMM's largess.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 7, 2001
MOSCOW - For years, this has been a city of dust and grit, of asphalt streets as big as runways and vacant lots scraped to the bare earth. But today, the city is battling its grimy, grim image. Moscow wants to bloom. City officials, determined to spruce up the place, planted acres of lawns and thousands of trees this fall after putting in millions of flowers earlier this year. Citizens who once spent their spare time growing potatoes and vegetables began learning to coax gladiolas and sunflowers out of the polluted soil.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
MOSCOW - By his own admission, Alexander Presnakov has reached the dead end of his life. And yet he is thankful. He is homeless in a climate where a nap on a park bench can be fatal, and yet he has a warm bed and a shower. He is jobless in a city of fledgling capitalism and rising prices. And yet he eats good food and has money for cigarettes. Presnakov is an educated, indeed learned, man who, at 48, finds himself a reluctant member of Russia's "bomzhi" - the down and out. Yet he is thankful to be a Muscovite - the only thing saving him from a frozen death in the city's harsh winter streets.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Shogren and Elizabeth Shogren,Los Angeles Times | August 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- Awakened before dawn Monday morning and ordered to get his men into tanks and head toward the Soviet capital, Lt. Nikolai Kotlerov had no idea he was being sent to enforce a reactionary coup d'etat."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | December 10, 1991
MOSCOW -- Most Muscovites might have preferred a pound of sausage or a quart of milk, but yesterday they accepted the new country presented to them agreeably enough.Alexander Stulov, hurrying last night from his job at a drugstore that has nothing to sell to his apartment where he has little to eat, was even able to find some humor in the situation."It's funny -- maybe outrageous -- to go to bed in one country and wake up in another without having to go anywhere at all," he said.Mr. Stulov, who is in his late 40s, wasn't eager to linger on the street in the bitter cold, but as he hurried off into the late-afternoon darkness, he drew some encouragement from the creation of the new country.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russians had been warned weeks ago that Boris N. Yeltsin's government, following through on his boldest economic reform yet, would lift the ceilings on most prices and allow others to triple and quadruple.But yesterday, it still hurt.A cane-toting pensioner -- fuming -- stalked out of the Smolensk Grocery Store, too aghast at the quintupled prices on candy and the pork that cost almost two months' pension per pound to buy anything."What I've seen today is a major-league, damn mess," said the pensioner, who identified himself only as Leonid.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 25, 1991
MOSCOW -- The day the hard-liners told the world that Mikhail S. Gorbachev was ill, a gentle Moscow man hurried to the apartment of some American friends fearing that the forces of darkness would soon be carrying him off.He gave the Americans a small, plastic grocery bag holding a well-worn address book, a collection of business cards and photos of a few close friends. Then he sighed with relief. When the KGB came to get him, he said, they would not find evidence to incriminate his friends.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 16, 1990
MOSCOW -- The struggle over Soviet economic reform reached an extraordinary pitch yesterday as Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov went on television to sound the alarm against too radical a change and to fight for his political life.Minutes later, Moscow Mayor Gavriil K. Popov appeared on th air to summon Muscovites to a demonstration today to demand the resignation of Mr. Ryzhkov and his government and call for a rapid shift to a market economy."I speak for preventing chaos in all aspects of our life, fo preserving social guarantees, the protection of our people," Mr. Ryzhkov said, warning in the evening news of dire consequences if his rivals' plan were to be adopted.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
MOSCOW - By his own admission, Alexander Presnakov has reached the dead end of his life. And yet he is thankful. He is homeless in a climate where a nap on a park bench can be fatal, and yet he has a warm bed and a shower. He is jobless in a city of fledgling capitalism and rising prices. And yet he eats good food and has money for cigarettes. Presnakov is an educated, indeed learned, man who, at 48, finds himself a reluctant member of Russia's "bomzhi" - the down and out. Yet he is thankful to be a Muscovite - the only thing saving him from a frozen death in the city's harsh winter streets.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 6, 2000
MOSCOW -- The dog bus from Milan is overdue. Mikhail Poznyakov has spent the better part of Wednesday waiting on a noisy street corner for his champion dachshund to return home from her triumph in Italy. Now his wife, Olga, is on the cell phone again, pressing him to tell her whether she should skip out of work to join him. But no one here has an answer for her. Not Poznyakov, not the older man who hates dogs but puts up with them on account of his wife, not the fat guy in the purple T-shirt -- the one who just smuggled a shipment of chameleons and spiders from Madagascar into Russia, in the lining of his coat, to sell as exotic pets.
TOPIC
By Helen Womack | May 16, 1999
MOSCOW -- I was lounging in the corridor, waiting to go into the steam bath, when a fat lobster-colored figure in a towel lumbered past, cursing: "That ye B.N. Ye.""Ye" are the first letters of Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin's surname. Ye is also the "f" word in Russian.The bather could find only expletives to express his disgust at the news that the Kremlin leader had again dismissed his government, plunging Russia into new political turmoil.We gathered around the television set in the anteroom, where bathers of both sexes drink beer or tea between bouts of steam.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 1996
MOSCOW -- Muscovites are scratching their hatless heads and wondering where their winter went.Last month was the warmest November on record in western Russia, and the first "officially" snowless one for Moscow.So instead of waking up to winter wonder each morning, Muscovites have been waking up to winter weirdness.Garlic stalks and hyacinth shoots are poking through the autumn mulch of suburban gardens.Poplars are turning green on Octyabraskaya Square downtown, and the traditional Easter pussy willows are budding all over the countryside.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 29, 1996
MOSCOW -- Baptist Pastor Alan Fluegge is here on a mission from God.What other inspiration could there be to bring his wife and 10 of their 11 children to live in Moscow, where they've had to squeeze into a three-room apartment, make six-hour treks for basic groceries and even learn a new language?The Carroll County preacher has come to save Russian souls from hellfire.In taking on this spiritual challenge, he has deposited his family into a social crucible that, by comfortable middle-American standards, is a form of hellfire itself.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 9, 1996
MOSCOW -- When someone discovers grandma's been locked in her apartment for four days, whom do you call? When a construction worker falls off scaffolding straight down a manhole, whom do you call?There's no 911 in Russia.But there is 007 -- the cellular phone number you can call to get retired KGB officer Alexander Shabalov's firm, Security Center of Flexible Technology.On contract to the city to provide emergency rescue services, SCFT's action teams come roaring to the rescue of Muscovites every day.They arrive in Shabalov's spy-fantasy "multifunctional vehicles" -- converted Land Rovers, bristling with high-tech readiness and emblazoned with the company's winged logo, which looks like Batman's.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 17, 1990
MOSCOW -- More than 30,000 Muscovites marched in a chilly drizzle from Gorky Park to the Kremlin yesterday to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Nikolai I. Ryzhkov and the formation of a multiparty "government of trust."Though the public temper in this capital has been frayed by back-to-back shortages of cigarettes and bread, the demonstrators never got more violent than booming chants of "Resign! Resign!" The march was backed by Moscow's radical leadership, elected last March, and the regular uniformed police who lined the two-mile route did not interfere.
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | August 21, 1991
MOSCOW -- Inside the War Room on the third floor of the Russian parliament building, commanders of the republic's forces spent the afternoon yesterday poring over maps of Moscow and a floor plan of the 12-floor building, plotting how to stave off an anticipated attack by Soviet army and Interior Ministry troops.Their attire told the story of Russia's patchwork defense. Two men wore Soviet army uniforms, another the World War I uniform of the Don Cossacks. Others, with pistols at their hips, were in camouflage suits, issued by a security firm called the Bells.
FEATURES
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 1996
MOSCOW -- Tell a Muscovite that a lot of Maryland school districts closed yesterday morning with less than 2 inches of snow on the ground and he'll laugh as if it's the punch-line to a how-many-Americans-does-it- take-to-screw-in-a-light-bulb joke.In a city where forward progress in any endeavor -- from making a left-hand turn to registering for school -- is notoriously complex, the storied Russian winter is just no big deal.Sub-zero temperatures are actually considered healthier for strolling your infant than temperatures that are "too warm," like 10 degrees.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 13, 1992
MOSCOW -- In an odd way, the angry and complicate debate consuming the opening days of Russia's Congress last week could be understood most clearly by considering the humble kiosks crowding Moscow's sidewalks.Russians look at the kiosks, which sell everything from liquor and fur coats to shampoo and underwear, and see either certain economic ruin or guaranteed salvation.The bustling kiosks, where prices are set by the seller and not the state, are an inescapable reminder that Russia has turned its back on a command economy and is trying mightily to adapt to a free market.
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