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Murray Perahia

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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 20, 2003
Murray Perahia has been accused of a rare crime in music -- perfection. All pianists should be so lucky. The charge came in a recent New York Times review of Perahia's recording of the complete Chopin etudes, which ultimately disappointed the writer because there just weren't any flaws. "I didn't know what to make of it," Perahia says from his London home. "The idea that playing can be too good doesn't make sense." Folks attending Perahia's recital this week for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, his 12th appearance there since 1971, likely won't feel the slightest letdown at hearing someone too good.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Murray Perahia may be more of a medium than a pianist. When he plays, it's as if he is somehow channeling the essence of a composer, not merely articulating notes of a score. Bach materializes before us, super-sized, just the way we like to think of him - ingenious, playful, utterly sincere. Beethoven struts his obstinately individualistic stuff, daring us to question his methods or his motives. Schubert charms and surprises us, sometimes worries us a little. Such, at any rate, was the impression Wednesday night as Perahia performed music by those three men in a recital with the Shriver Hall Concert Series.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 1999
Murray Perahia's piano playing is so natural in its phrasing, so beautiful in its sonority and so unmarred by idiosyncrasies that it is sometimes possible to forget what an original musician he can be. This was the case in his appearance Saturday in the Kennedy Center's Concert Hall -- with a program that featured genuinely revelatory performances of works by Beethoven and Schubert.Perhaps the high point of the program was Perahia's performance of Schubert's C Minor Sonata. This work, with which the printed program concluded, is often compared to (and interpreted like)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 20, 2003
Murray Perahia has been accused of a rare crime in music -- perfection. All pianists should be so lucky. The charge came in a recent New York Times review of Perahia's recording of the complete Chopin etudes, which ultimately disappointed the writer because there just weren't any flaws. "I didn't know what to make of it," Perahia says from his London home. "The idea that playing can be too good doesn't make sense." Folks attending Perahia's recital this week for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, his 12th appearance there since 1971, likely won't feel the slightest letdown at hearing someone too good.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 2, 1997
Until a little less than six years ago, everybody in the classical music business seemed to know who Murray Perahia was.Musicians as distinguished as Leon Fleisher said he was the kind of musician who inspired hope for music's future; many American critics called him the best pianist this country had ever produced; and European critics adored him so much they usually forgot that Perahia was American.But since the early '90s, discussions about the pianist have been not about who, but where Perahia was and what had happened to him. Except for a very few appearances and a very large number of cancellation notices, Perahia seemed to have dropped out of sight.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 23, 1995
Beethoven, Piano Sonatas, Opus 2 (Nos. 1 in F minor, 2 in A major and 3 in C major), performed by Alfred Brendel (Philips Classics 442124) and Murray Perahia (Sony Classical 64397)Alfred Brendel's disc is part of his current cycle-in-progress of the sonatas -- when completed, it will be his third. That Perahia's disc contains all three of the first sonatas for piano Beethoven published suggests that it may have been intended as the first volume in a complete cycle. If that is true -- and if the cycle is completed -- that would be very good news: Perahia's performances of the composer's first triptych of sonatas are tremendous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 8, 2001
J. S. Bach Keyboard Concertos, Nos. 1, 2 and 4. Murray Perahia, pianist and conductor; Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. (Sony Classical SK 89245) Murray Perahia was responsible for one of last year's most indelible recordings - Bach's "Goldberg Variations." Although it's still early in 2001, his latest exploration of Bach may well make a similar mark. Due in stores March 13, this first volume in a survey of the keyboard concertos is a triumph of artistic insight and technical refinement.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 25, 2003
Murray Perahia may be more of a medium than a pianist. When he plays, it's as if he is somehow channeling the essence of a composer, not merely articulating notes of a score. Bach materializes before us, super-sized, just the way we like to think of him - ingenious, playful, utterly sincere. Beethoven struts his obstinately individualistic stuff, daring us to question his methods or his motives. Schubert charms and surprises us, sometimes worries us a little. Such, at any rate, was the impression Wednesday night as Perahia performed music by those three men in a recital with the Shriver Hall Concert Series.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 24, 1999
Murray Perahia is getting to be quite an adventurer. In his recital this afternoon at the Kennedy Center, the celebrated pianist will play one of Beethoven's least-frequently performed piano sonatas: No. 14 in C-sharp Minor (Opus 27, No. 2). Wait a minute! Isn't that the so-called "Moonlight Sonata," whose dreamy opening movement is among the most familiar pieces ever written? "But how often in 15 years of reviewing have you heard it?" Perahia asks. Incredibly enough, the answer seems to be only twice.
NEWS
February 21, 2002
Candlelight Concerts will present Musicians from Marlboro at 8 p.m. Saturday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. In its 37th season, the group is a touring extension of the Marlboro Music Festival in Marlboro, Vt. Young musicians from the summer festival perform with seasoned artists in chamber music programs of rare works and masterpieces. Each year, more than 25 artists take time from their regular activities to bring Musicians from Marlboro concerts to cities across the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 4, 2002
J.S. Bach Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 3, 5, 6 and 7. Murray Perahia, pianist and conductor; Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. (Sony Classical SK 89690) "Play Bach." Awadagin Pratt, pianist; St. Lawrence String Quartet. (Angel 7243 5 57227) Bach: Sonatas for Violin and Harpsichord. Giuliano Carmignola, violinist; Andrea Marcon, harpsichordist. (Sony Classical S2K 89469, two discs) The intricate brilliance and sheer beauty of Bach's music find worthy advocates in these three new releases.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 1999
Murray Perahia's piano playing is so natural in its phrasing, so beautiful in its sonority and so unmarred by idiosyncrasies that it is sometimes possible to forget what an original musician he can be. This was the case in his appearance Saturday in the Kennedy Center's Concert Hall -- with a program that featured genuinely revelatory performances of works by Beethoven and Schubert.Perhaps the high point of the program was Perahia's performance of Schubert's C Minor Sonata. This work, with which the printed program concluded, is often compared to (and interpreted like)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 2, 1997
Until a little less than six years ago, everybody in the classical music business seemed to know who Murray Perahia was.Musicians as distinguished as Leon Fleisher said he was the kind of musician who inspired hope for music's future; many American critics called him the best pianist this country had ever produced; and European critics adored him so much they usually forgot that Perahia was American.But since the early '90s, discussions about the pianist have been not about who, but where Perahia was and what had happened to him. Except for a very few appearances and a very large number of cancellation notices, Perahia seemed to have dropped out of sight.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 23, 1995
Beethoven, Piano Sonatas, Opus 2 (Nos. 1 in F minor, 2 in A major and 3 in C major), performed by Alfred Brendel (Philips Classics 442124) and Murray Perahia (Sony Classical 64397)Alfred Brendel's disc is part of his current cycle-in-progress of the sonatas -- when completed, it will be his third. That Perahia's disc contains all three of the first sonatas for piano Beethoven published suggests that it may have been intended as the first volume in a complete cycle. If that is true -- and if the cycle is completed -- that would be very good news: Perahia's performances of the composer's first triptych of sonatas are tremendous.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 1998
The Vice Admiral Elliot Bryant and Miriam Bryant Distinguished Artist Series has brought performers of international stature to the Naval Academy in Annapolis for seven years, and this year's series is no exception.Russia's St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra, which has attracted high-quality talent since its inception, opens the series Nov. 12 on the Alumni Hall stage.hTC Conductors such as Leonard Bernstein, Kiril Kondrashin, Gennady Rozhdestvensky and Simon Rattle have taken the podium with the orchestra since its founding in 1967, and soloists of the magnitude of pianist Murray Perahia and cellist Mstislav Rostropovich have dotted the ranks of its collaborating artists.
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