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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
It wasn't until Karen Koch saw pictures of her house in a local magazine that she realized how terrific it was. Last spring, she agreed to a photographic house tour for a friend, who was the editor. "I saw the pictures and I thought, 'Damn. It looks good.'" Soon she will see if everybody agrees. Her 1920s four-square in Annapolis' Murray Hill community will be among the 10 homes open Nov. 4 and 5 for the 20th annual Annapolis by Candlelight house tour. "We've put so much blood, sweat and tears into this house," said Koch, the owner of Miss Nancy's Fancy Bakery in Annapolis.
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NEWS
October 23, 2013
The Howard County Board of Education is scheduled to open a new middle school next year in Hanover. In order to do that, students must be redistricted into the new facility. Below is a list of final recommendations for student redistricting made to the board, subject to several work sessions, public hearings and the board's approval: • Bonnie Branch to Mayfield Woods: 106 students • Bonnie Branch to Elkridge Landing: 65 students • Elkridge Landing to New Middle School: 155 students • Hammond to Lime Kiln: 72 students • Mayfield Woods to Bonnie Branch: 40 students • Mayfield Woods to New Middle School: 205 students • Murray Hill to Patuxent Valley: 247 students • Patuxent Valley to Hammond: 92 students • Patuxent Valley to Lake Elkhorn: 42 students • Patuxent Valley to New Middle School: 153 students Source: Howard County Public School System
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1996
Sidestepping two controversies in the southeastern portion of Howard County, the school board has decided that its newest middle school will be named Murray Hill Middle School.The decision ends almost three months of discussion on what to name the school being built off Gorman Road near Murray Hill Road. A school system committee had recommended in August the name Fairview Middle School, like the house at Gorman and Murray Hill roads, where Kingdon Gould III lives.Some residents wanted the school named Rocky Gorge, the name they have recently adopted for the community.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
Gilbert Thornton Renaut, a retired federal attorney who became an Annapolis activist, mayoral candidate and neighborhood problem-solver, died of a heart attack Feb. 27 at his home in the capital's Murray Hill community. He was 66. "Gilbert had an abiding passion for Annapolis," Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen said in a statement. "His decades-long record of involvement as a civic leader, as a member of numerous boards and commissions, and as a candidate for public office greatly enriched our quality of life.
BUSINESS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | September 30, 2007
A century ago, Murray Hill was prized as a breezy hilltop retreat from hot, crowded downtown Annapolis and the smelly waters of the Spa Creek basin. Today, it is the place to live if you want to be able to walk to City Dock and all the shopping, dining and waterfront delights of the state's capital. Bounded by West Street on the north and Spa Creek on the south, Shaw Street on the east and Amos Garrett Boulevard on the west, Murray Hill has a rich history. In 1650s, a carpenter named Richard Acton purchased 100 acres on what is now Spa Creek.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 1997
IT'S NO secret that our area is growing rapidly. All our schools are at capacity.Opening this fall is a new middle school, Murray Hill.This week, the staff held open houses for students and their families.The building is filled, at the moment, with boxes and crates as staff members rush to get ready for opening day next week.Principal Vince Catania is certain that everything will be in place by then.He has recruited a diverse staff that has experience in the Howard school system and elsewhere as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Eliza Toomey's backyard is about the size of a postage stamp, and it is bathed in shadows cast by a thick canopy of trees. Clearly, if she were to have a vegetable garden, it would have to be planted in someone else's yard. So she passed out fliers, had a meeting and, now, Toomey is planting vegetables in the backyards of 21 of her neighbors in Murray Hill in Annapolis. The 25-year-old middle school teacher is planting the seeds and the seedlings and, though she is asking for a little help with watering, she will care for the gardens, harvest the vegetables and distribute the bounty to her 21 new friends every week this summer.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2001
For years, schools in North Laurel struggled to do a lot with a little. Little funding, little parent participation, little partnership help from community organizations and agencies. But now the state Department of Education has recognized the little the schools had to work with, and turned it into a lot. Laurel Woods Elementary, Murray Hill Middle and Atholton High have received a state grant worth more than $2 million over three years to help implement a program intended to increase academic achievement, safety, health and wellness and recreational services for North Laurel children.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2006
The magnet that 10-year-old Nathan Rivera was creating featured a creature with large, mismatched googly eyes, a blue fuzzball of a head and an oversized mustache, made from a strip of blue felt. "I made Albert Einstein," Nathan said. "He's crazy about his new idea." Nathan was one of about 70 kids attending the Summer at the Hill camp put on by Murray Hill Middle School in Laurel. During the hourlong arts and crafts part of the day, he sat with several other pupils and made magnet creatures.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Andrea F. Siegel and Amanda J. Crawford and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
Just beyond the bustle of the State House and Annapolis' downtown bars is a quiet, century-old neighborhood of gracious homes with inviting porches and manicured lawns. Murray Hill, a waterfront community of about 700 mostly upscale homes built between the 1890s and 1940s, is a place residents say harks back to small-town America. But it is also on the cusp of major change. Anne Arundel Medical Center -- where generations of Murray Hill residents had babies, went for medical treatment and watched loved ones die -- is leaving its 4.5-acre site at the community's eastern gateway this fall.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
The Annapolis waterfront house with a $1.77 million price tag, the second-most-expensive property sold in the Baltimore region in September, was under contract after just one week. The house at 131 Spa View Ave., in the state capital's Murray Hill neighborhood, has a traditional exterior and contemporary interior and a deck, patio and private pier that overlooks Spa Creek. The five-bedroom, four-bath house went on the market in move-in condition, said Day Weitzman, the listing agent.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
It wasn't until Karen Koch saw pictures of her house in a local magazine that she realized how terrific it was. Last spring, she agreed to a photographic house tour for a friend, who was the editor. "I saw the pictures and I thought, 'Damn. It looks good.'" Soon she will see if everybody agrees. Her 1920s four-square in Annapolis' Murray Hill community will be among the 10 homes open Nov. 4 and 5 for the 20th annual Annapolis by Candlelight house tour. "We've put so much blood, sweat and tears into this house," said Koch, the owner of Miss Nancy's Fancy Bakery in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
A waterfront lot is as hard to come by in downtown Annapolis as a parking space during tourist season. But patience can pay off. Interior designer Gay Henriksen has plenty of patience. For a decade, she and her husband and two youngest daughters lived in the Murray Hill section of downtown, right behind a decaying house that sat on three lots, cheek by jowl to Spa Creek. Henriksen, owner of GH Interiors, kept an eye on the property, envisioning the opportunity for a design project of a lifetime.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
In the early 1980s, Gilbert Renaut built a home in Murray Hill, a neighborhood within walking distance of Spa Creek and downtown Annapolis. The one-time federal litigator had an affinity for architectural history and wanted to prove he could build a Colonial reproduction house on a middle-class budget. After that project led to a stint on the Annapolis Historic Preservation Committee, he also ended up proving he had a passion for local politics. He chaired the Murray Hill Centennial in 1990, served as president of the Murray Hill Residents Association and then ran the Ward One Residents Association.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 11, 2009
Margaret S. Doub, a homemaker who enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake Bay for 40 years, died in her sleep Monday at her home in the Murray Hill section of Baltimore County. She was 91. Margaret Simmons, the daughter of a businessman and homemaker, was born in Hagerstown and raised near Oklahoma City. While living in Oklahoma, Mrs. Doub acquired a lifelong interest in American Indian cultures. When she was 18, family members said, she was inducted into the Kiowa tribe and given the Indian name of Dor-chi-um-gee, which means "Kneel and Pray."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Eliza Toomey's backyard is about the size of a postage stamp, and it is bathed in shadows cast by a thick canopy of trees. Clearly, if she were to have a vegetable garden, it would have to be planted in someone else's yard. So she passed out fliers, had a meeting and, now, Toomey is planting vegetables in the backyards of 21 of her neighbors in Murray Hill in Annapolis. The 25-year-old middle school teacher is planting the seeds and the seedlings and, though she is asking for a little help with watering, she will care for the gardens, harvest the vegetables and distribute the bounty to her 21 new friends every week this summer.
NEWS
June 30, 1991
Services for Ilda D. Stockbridge, who won awards for flower arranging and holiday door decorations, will be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Towson Presbyterian Church, Chesapeake and Highland avenues.Mrs. Stockbridge, who was 87 and lived for many years in Murray Hill, died early Friday at the Good Samaritan Hospital after a long illness.The former Ilda Dicken was a native of Davis, W.Va., and came to Baltimore to study at the Maryland Institute College of Art.In addition to winning prizes for her decorations and arrangements, she was a member of the Murray Hill Garden Club.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | August 1, 2003
The second Night of the Arts, a showcase for youths who participated in LAMP summer programs, played July 24 to a packed house in Murray Hill Middle School's dining room. "There was a lot of excitement. There was kind of a buzz as you walked in the room. The kids were very excited to perform, and they did a phenomenal job," said Dana Lowe, LAMP's family and community outreach liaison. Last year's Night of the Arts boasted 200 performers, and a similar number participated in this year's show, Lowe said.
NEWS
September 28, 2008
The Southeast Horizon Council will hold its sixth Family Health Expo from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Murray Hill Middle School. The event is designed to give residents and North Laurel and Savage access to Howard County's health and human services providers. Free blood pressure, bone density, dental, vision, hearing and breast health screenings will be offered. A representative from the Health Department will be available to provide Flu Mist to children, ages 2 to 18, who qualify.
BUSINESS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | September 30, 2007
A century ago, Murray Hill was prized as a breezy hilltop retreat from hot, crowded downtown Annapolis and the smelly waters of the Spa Creek basin. Today, it is the place to live if you want to be able to walk to City Dock and all the shopping, dining and waterfront delights of the state's capital. Bounded by West Street on the north and Spa Creek on the south, Shaw Street on the east and Amos Garrett Boulevard on the west, Murray Hill has a rich history. In 1650s, a carpenter named Richard Acton purchased 100 acres on what is now Spa Creek.
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