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By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | April 24, 1993
More than 150 people were evacuated from a West Baltimore high-rise for about 90 minutes last night when authorities found PTC possible bomb on top of an elevator.Members of the city police bomb squad removed the device -- consisting of several foot-long cylinders, wires and a jug containing an unknown chemical -- in a fortified bomb-disposal trailer.Police still were unsure late last night if the device contained explosive material.City firefighters had gone to 725 George St., a 14-story high-rise in the George B. Murphy Homes project, about 9:50 p.m. for a report of someone stuck in the elevator, police said.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
Baltimore police say they have made an arrest in the killing last week of a 53-year-old man, while officials also identified an 18-year-old man who was fatally shot in Southwest Baltimore. Leroy Smith, 21, of the 1200 block of W. Mosher St., has been charged in the fatal stabbing of 53-year-old Eddie Nance, who was killed early Friday in the 600 block of George St., police said. Nance was drinking with two friends in an apartment when two people, who were known to them, came over, police said.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
At least 150 police officers raided a drug-ridden public housing complex in West Baltimore today, targeting more than two dozen suspects accused of supplying residents and others with heroin and cocaine.The raids at 27 apartments in three high-rise buildings at the George B. Murphy Homes, and several other low-rise buildings nearby, follow the arrests last week of five people charged as major drug suppliers to the project.Among those arrested last Saturday was a maintenance worker for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, who police said may have used his position to hide heroin in various places at Murphy Homes.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
The body of William Donald Schaefer lay in state Tuesday in the marble rotunda of City Hall, and a line curled around the historic building as people waited to pay their respects. Standing in the bright April sun, the mourners — old and young, rich and poor, black and white — clutched photos of Schaefer and described how he shaped their lives and their city. Here are some of their stories: Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi It's been more than three decades, but Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi still hums the jingle when she sees a street corner trash basket: "Trash Ball, it's a neat game everybody can win. Let me show you how to play.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
A single bullet to the head today ended the life of a 23-year-old Baltimore man whose body was found in a stairwell at the George B. Murphy Homes in West Baltimore.Police identified the victim as Charles O. Dodd Jr., 23, a resident of the housing project at 1058 Argyle Ave.Evidence found near Dodd's body led police to report the killing was drug-related.City homicide detective Frank Barlow said a caller told police just before 4 a.m. that a man had been found shot in a stairwell near the fourth floor of the project.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
To rescue the neighborhood, start with the school.The neighborhood: Murphy Homes, the West Baltimore housing project long beset by a seemingly endless cycle of drugs, violence, poverty and despair.The school: George Street Elementary, or what used to be George Street Elementary, that is. Yesterday, it became the George Street Academy of Mathematics and Science.It is not a little bit ironic -- and certainly no coincidence -- that the Baltimore school system chose one of the poorest schools in one of the poorest communities to become its only elementary school-level academy.
NEWS
By David Simon | February 8, 1992
A young drug trafficker believed to have been shot to death this week by Baltimore police officers in a gunbattle at a high-rise housing project instead may have been killed by gunfire from someone who has yet to be identified by police.Autopsy findings suggest that two of three bullets that struck 25-year-old Wayne D. Watts -- including one slug that fatally pierced the heart -- may have been fired by a .22-caliber revolver recovered by detectives at the scene, sources close to the investigation say.A third wound to the groin was caused by 9mm jacketed ammunition, used by plainclothes officers who fired 15 rounds into a crowded fifth-floor hallway at 1058 Argyle Ave. after Watts shot at them with a .357-caliber Magnum handgun.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | April 7, 1991
At a groundbreaking ceremony in November 1961, Mayor J Harold Grady stood on the corner of Myrtle and George streets in West Baltimore, looked out over a neighborhood of ramshackle row houses and announced the construction of a public housing complex that would halt the spreading decay.George B. Murphy Homes -- with its modern 14-story towers -- would provide affordable, sanitary and safe housing to hundreds of poor families and stimulate private improvements throughout the area, he said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | August 20, 1992
In front of a high-rise building at George B. Murphy Homes housing project yesterday, Johnny Jones urged residents to come out and rally for what he said was the right to live in a safe and drug-free environment.He had hoped rallies at the West Baltimore development and in front of City Hall would show city officials how concerned the residents are about increasing crime and violence in their community.But Mr. Jones was unaware that city housing officials had already promised another group of Murphy Homes tenants that increased security measures would be in place within months.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
Backed by 100 police officers, repair crews and social workers yesterday took over a 14-story building in Murphy Homes -- the city's most drug- and crime-ridden public housing complex -- and began efforts to reverse the blight.After police required all visitors to leave, teams of workers inspected every apartment, repaired leaky faucets, painted over graffiti and taught residents how to maintain their homes. Police also opened a substation in the high-rise.Over the past several weeks, police raided 10 apartments and arrested people on suspicion of selling drugs out of their homes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 24, 2008
Martin Luther King Jr. often said, "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice," and these words came to mind the other day as we learned the story of Lorraine Johnson, one of the original plaintiffs in Thompson v. HUD, the 13-year-old lawsuit brought by tenants of Baltimore's public housing ghettos against the federal agency that kept them there for so long. Johnson and other tenants had asked a federal judge to remedy decades of segregationist policies that left thousands of poor, black families stuck in the worst of living conditions.
NEWS
May 6, 2005
EUSTACE "SHANE" Thornton was a colorful character who spoke with a poetic flourish and endeared himself to others with his winning smile. He once attended college and held a steady job. After years of struggling with alcoholism and mental illness, Mr. Thornton died from liver disease last fall and became one of 80 homeless people to die in the city last year, each a tragic story of addiction or mental illness, poor health and hard luck, lost jobs and...
NEWS
July 4, 2004
On June 27, 2004, MS. PUMKIN, of the former Murphy Homes. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue on Monday 1 to 6 P.M. The family will receive friends in the chapel on Tuesday at 1 P.M. Funeral at 1:30 P.M.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2004
Nathan "Bodie" Barksdale was among West Baltimore's better known and more violent heroin dealers in the 1980s and has the criminal record to prove it. When he was arrested last year, charged as a felon in possession of a gun, that notorious history presented Barksdale with a current-day problem: If he were convicted on the gun violation in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Barksdale, now 43, could be classified as a career offender and face a mandatory minimum...
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Alongside a newly painted gazebo and a manicured park, West Baltimore residents celebrated yesterday the completion of Heritage Crossing, a new townhouse community that replaces the George B. Murphy Homes housing project. "It's like an Andy of Mayberry neighborhood, only with a different color and different flavor," U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said at the celebration. The clean sidewalks and mowed yards are a stark contrast to the crime-ridden Murphy high-rises, which were demolished in 1999 to make way for the new development.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
Walking through Heritage Crossing is like strolling in any suburban development with cookie-cutter homes, wide streets, manicured lawns and bright sidewalks - a drastic change from what this city site was just four years ago. Almost one year after opening, all 260 townhomes in this new community west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in West Baltimore are accounted for: 185 of them are owner-occupied, the rest are rentals. It has been quite a journey from the George B. Murphy Homes that were demolished in 1999 to the new townhomes at Heritage.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1999
Baltimore will demolish Murphy Homes public housing in West Baltimore on July 3, the third of the city's four public housing complexes to be knocked down.City Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III made the announcement yesterday during his monthly news conference. Henson also discussed city plans to acquire private property adjacent to the Flag House Courts complexes in East Baltimore, which the city hopes will attract business developers and create jobs.Flag House Courts, which is scheduled to be demolished in July 2000, will be the last of the city's high-rise public housing to come down.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
Baltimore housing officials have ordered several two-story heaps of rubble leveled after Upton neighborhood residents began complaining that dust from the debris of the recently-imploded Murphy Homes complex was making them sick.For weeks, residents say they watched while contractors wearing masks and special suits ground bricks, mortar and concrete into fine gravel. Yet those living in the community say they have no protection from the daily dust storms that blow through the area, leaving a thick layer of dust on almost everything.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell, Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell, Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
To his lawyer, he is a caring father, a gentleman unfairly targeted by police. To police and prosecutors, he is one of the most violent inhabitants of the city. In the past six years, he has been charged repeatedly with assaults and shootings, including two killings and 12 attempted murders. To jurors in four trials, he is a man not guilty because police and prosecutors failed to convince them. His name is Solothal Deandre Thomas. On the street, he's called "Itchy Man." He is a startling example of the problems that beset the criminal courts.
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