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By William F. Buckley Jr | May 27, 1992
ALL THAT outsiders knew about Murphy Brown was the context supplied by the vice president. What he said, in the course of making the point about the consequences of deteriorated morals, was, "It doesn't help matters when prime-time TV has Murphy Brown -- a character who supposedly epitomizes today's intelligent, highly paid, professional woman -- mocking the importance of fathers by bearing a child alone and calling it just another 'lifestyle choice.'...
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 28, 2013
Almost exactly 20 years ago, Barbara Dafoe Whitehead wrote a controversial essay for The Atlantic titled "Dan Quayle Was Right. " In case you forgot (or never knew), let me fill you in on what Mr. Quayle was right about. There once was a popular sitcom called "Murphy Brown. " The title character, played by Candice Bergen, was a news anchor. The show had its moments, but it was also insufferably pleased with itself and its liberalism. At least until the arrival of the Aaron Sorkin oeuvre ("The West Wing," "The Newsroom")
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1996
There's a reunion of sorts on "Murphy Brown" tonight that sounds like fun."Cosby" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- I've heard of taking one for your family, but this is ridiculous: Hilton (Bill Cosby) winds up in the hospital and receives a colonoscopy meant for his cousin. CBS."Mr. Rhodes" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- That Mr. Rhodes can't help but get himself into trouble: He invites his former role model, a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York writer, to serve as the school's artist-in-residence.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
I miss Murphy Brown. Not so much the sitcom of old, although I did watch it regularly and loved Candice Bergen's sass and style (great white shirts, cool accessories) as TV reporter Murphy Brown. But what I really miss is a time when campaign discourse about unwed pregnancy centered on a grown-up, albeit fictional, woman rather than a 17-year-old, and very real, girl. Back then - 1992, to be exact - it was slightly comical when Vice President Dan Quayle triggered a dispute by holding up Murphy Brown as a symbol of the breakdown in family values because the fictional character had a fictional baby out of fictional wedlock.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 11, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* From the beginning, it has been a cute gimmick on "Murphy Brown" to see real-life television news figures pop up on the show. But it is hard to remember one of those cameos getting so much promotional mileage as Harry Smith's appearance on the CBS show Monday night.He was on for just a short spot, as the presenter of the fictional Humboldt Award reporting prize won by Frank (Joe Regalbuto).But Smith got a lot more air time yesterday on his "CBS This Morning," reminiscing about the puff appearance.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | May 20, 1991
JUST WONDERING:* To wed or not to wed? We're talking about "Murphy Brown," of course, for that seems to be the burning question of tonight's season finale (at 9, Channel 11).Murphy (Candice Bergen) apparently will take all summer to decide not only whether but who, torn between suitors Jerry (Jay Thomas) and Jake (Robin Thomas).Media Monitor wants to hear some marital advice from readers. Specifically, should TV's thorniest lady hitch herself to a man? (TV Guide this week asked a bunch of so-so celebrities the same question, but what do they know compared to loyal column readers?
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 26, 1992
It's the election-year equivalent of "Who Shot J.R.?": How will the fictional Murphy Brown respond to the real-life Dan Quayle's comments about her unwed motherhood in the season premiere of "Murphy Brown"?Ever since the vice president took aim against Murphy's single motherhood and generated front-page headlines in what appears to be a widening Republican campaign strategy of attacking Hollywood's "family values," the producers and actors on the CBS sitcom have been besieged with requests for information about the season's first installment, an hourlong episode scheduled for Sept.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISON CRITIC | September 18, 1995
"Hi, I'm Murphy Brown, and you must be my new secretary," Murphy says to the guy in the dark suit, sitting head down at the desk outside her office.But it's not just the latest entry in her secretarial sweepstakes. The guy looks up, and it's -- gasp! -- John F. Kennedy Jr., smiling in all his People magazine glory.You have to hand it to "Murphy Brown." No prime-time television series since "All in the Family" has done a better job of playing American political life for both satire and ratings sizzle.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
Los Angeles -- THE TELEVISION Critics Association gave "Murphy Brown" its comedy award, but amid the congratulations executive producer Diane English admitted that there is some trepidation about the next year of the series."
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | May 11, 1992
Forget Drs. Spock and Brazelton, here's what Murphy Brown really needs to know when she joins the ever growing sisterhood of newsmoms:Always bring an extra jacket to work. Sleep any time the opportunity presents itself. And don't worry about turning into a mush-brain.That's some of the advice offered by local TV newswomen with real-life babies to their fictional counterpart Murphy Brown -- who is one week away from having an equally fictional baby on her namesake CBS sitcom."Sometimes you pick them up on your way out, or you burp them, and you don't know what they've done back there," says WMAR-TV (Channel 2)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 12, 2007
Great TV comedy can be mined from the experience of having a baby. Proof of that can be found in every decade of prime-time programming: Think I Love Lucy in the 1950s (at the height of the real-life baby boom), or Murphy Brown in the '80s and Mad About You in the '90s. On TV Notes from the Underbelly premieres at 10 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2).
NEWS
By ED BARK and ED BARK,THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 22, 2006
CBS has a long and rich history of comedic leading ladies. Lucille Ball, Carol Burnett and Mary Tyler Moore are TV Hall of Famers on the strength of shows bearing their names. Bea Arthur (Maude) and Candice Bergen (Murphy Brown) had long-running CBS hits driven by their title characters. Lately, though, women have been in the passenger seats on CBS' few remaining sitcoms. King of Queens and Still Standing are built around tubby Dads, How I Met Your Mother is male-centric and the title of Two and a Half Men speaks for itself.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2002
PASADENA, Calif. - Candice Bergen, whose Murphy Brown character was attacked by Dan Quayle during the 1992 election campaign, responded to Quayle's recent remarks in support of the family values he perceived in MTV's The Osbournes. "That Dan," Bergen said, shaking her head and smiling. "You just can't predict him." Bergen is at the summer 2002 Television Critics Association press tour this week talking about her new Oxygen cable series Candice Checks It Out, which launches Aug. 18. A follow-up to her previous Oxygen series, Exhale, this new effort has Bergen spending time with people whom, for one reason or another, she finds compelling.
FEATURES
By Mike Conklin and Mike Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2002
HUNTINGTON, Ind. - Dan Johns, executive director of the Dan Quayle museum, leaned closer to a display case to check a fact that had eluded him. "Let's see, now," he said, a furrow suddenly creasing his forehead, his voice growing solemn. "Did the potato thing come first, and then it was Murphy Brown, or was it Murphy Brown, and then the potato thing? I know they were very close. Ah, yes. Here it is. Murphy Brown first, then potato." Or p-o-t-a-t-o-e, as Quayle once spelled it in the presence of a group of disbelieving grammar school students.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 24, 1999
One of the more complicated end-of-the-television-season rituals is saying goodbye to one-time hit series that have overstayed their welcome.In recent years, that list has included "Murphy Brown" and "Roseanne." Tonight, in that category comes "Mad About You" with Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser in a one-hour finale titled "The Final Frontier."The episode opens with Paul (Reiser) and Jamie (Hunt) Buchman in bed introducing a clip reel of some of their "favorite moments from the last seven years."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 30, 1998
Faith Ford plays a small-town girl who returns to her roots after the bust-up of her big-city marriage in the new CBS sitcom "Maggie Winters."Ford is a nice supporting player, as anyone knows who watched her Corky Sherwood character over the years on "Murphy Brown." But this leading role may be too much for her to handle. Ford's two or three Corky moves start wearing thin by the first commercial break.But just because she's not much of a leading actress and the sitcom is not all that entertaining, it doesn't mean "Maggie Winters" is dead meat.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Glenn McNatt is a Baltimore Sun editorial writer | May 26, 1992
Do we really need a serious discussion this election year about the plight of families in America and what government can do to support and strengthen them? You bet we do.It's a subject that has been ignored for the past 12 years by three successive Republican administrations. The consequences of that neglect for America's children have been profound.Yet it's also a subject that doesn't seem to interest Vice President Quayle much. He would rather prattle on about TV sitcom characters who have babies out of wedlock and who "mock the importance of fathers."
FEATURES
By Mary Gottschalk and Mary Gottschalk,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 1, 1992
It didn't take long for Bill Hargate, costume designer for the hit "Murphy Brown" television show, to discover what a lot of women could have told him: Maternity clothes leave a lot to be desired.When Mr. Hargate learned that Ms. Brown, played by Candice Bergen, is going to have a baby this season, he says, "I thought about quitting. I didn't know anything about maternity clothes, and when I looked in the windows it was kind of frightening. I thought there's got to be another way to do it."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC Chris Kaltenbach contributed to this story | May 17, 1998
Murphy Brown," the CBS sitcom starring Candice Bergen as a Washington anchorwoman, will end its 10-year run tomorrow night with a one-hour episode. It would be nice to say it was a glorious run and America is going to miss "Murphy Brown," but that would be two lies.The once-great sitcom overstayed its welcome, and, in recent years, became preachy, predictable, smug and flat. Ultimately, it is guilty of one of the worst sins a television show can commit: It betrayed the trust of its fans.Even Bergen acknowledges "two dismal seasons," referring to 1995-1996 and 1996-1997, saying she "wasn't as aware as the viewing public that the show had disintegrated to the point that it had."
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | May 13, 1998
THERE is something absolutely annoying about the way some culture gurus take for granted that, come tomorrow night, we will all sit glued to our televisions watching the last episode of "Seinfeld."To do otherwise is to be uncivilized, un-American, someone unworthy of calling herself a New Yorker.Well, excuse me. I have been a New Yorker for 22 years. But I am not a "Seinfeld" fan. And, from what I have gathered from various folks I've talked to in recent days, I am not alone.I am not one of those snobs who insist that they never watch television.
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