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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1991
Air so cold it numbed their faces and froze every breath. Ice so thick it took pickaxes and 10-pound mauls to open doors. Ships rolling in single file following the narrow channel cut by an icebreaker, sitting ducks for Nazi U-boat torpedoes and strafing airplanes."
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NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
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NEWS
October 29, 1992
The restored Liberty ship, S.S. John W. Brown, served as an appropriate backdrop at the Dundalk Marine Terminal early this month as some 250 American veterans of the World War II supply runs to Murmansk received Russian medals.It took 50 years for these graying men to receive the recognition -- and when they did, both the name and the flag of the country they aided had changed."Today Russia has a new flag," Ambassador Vladimir Lukin noted as he stood below his country's tri-color and the star-spangled banner.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 29, 2008
Richard Lee Anderson, a retired laboratory technician and World War II merchant seaman who helped restore the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at his Parkville home. He was 84. Mr. Anderson, who was known as Richard or Richie, was born in Baltimore and raised near Clifton Park. After graduating from City College in 1942, he received an appointment to the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y. Because of the wartime necessity of merchant mariners, Mr. Anderson went to sea in January 1943, after only attending the academy for three months, as a cadet aboard the former Moore-McCormack passenger line S.S. Argentina, which had been converted into a troop carrier.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 1996
MOSCOW -- Maxim's restaurant, the swank international purveyor of belle epoque decadence, could not have chosen a more perfect location for its newest branch. Or worse business partners.Six months after the mahogany-paneled restaurant opened across from the Kremlin, giving Russia's newly moneyed class a place to sip $1,000-a-bottle Bordeaux and eat quail-egg-and-caviar tartlets, Maxim's has belatedly discovered that it is married to the Russian mob.The luxury chain owned by designer Pierre Cardin had assumed its main Russian partner was a legitimate, if rather young, entrepreneur.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 5, 1993
MURMANSK, Russia -- Russia's political leaders are asking a disillusioned people to give them one more chance to create a post-Communist nation.But with crucial elections only a week away, few voters appear ready to make a great leap of faith into the future. Most are approaching next Sunday's vote with more weary resignation than partisan fervor.Yet the stakes are enormous. President Boris N. Yeltsin is asking Russia to elect a new parliament and to approve a new constitution. The results could immeasurably strengthen Mr. Yeltsin or irreparably damage him; they could lead to peaceful evolution of democratic institutions or complete chaos -- and anything in between.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 29, 2008
Richard Lee Anderson, a retired laboratory technician and World War II merchant seaman who helped restore the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at his Parkville home. He was 84. Mr. Anderson, who was known as Richard or Richie, was born in Baltimore and raised near Clifton Park. After graduating from City College in 1942, he received an appointment to the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y. Because of the wartime necessity of merchant mariners, Mr. Anderson went to sea in January 1943, after only attending the academy for three months, as a cadet aboard the former Moore-McCormack passenger line S.S. Argentina, which had been converted into a troop carrier.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The person who terrified the rest of the world by voting for Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky party last week was a youngish man, less-educated and lower-paid than those who chose the parties of reform.This person -- as he emerges from pollsters' profiles -- most likely is not really a fascist now, though Mr. Zhirinovsky himself has been so labeled. But within his soul he harbors all the danger signs.He is a person who will be ardently courted in the coming `D months by the nationalist, anti-reform elements that emerged from the Russian parliamentary election.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF AND FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 7, 1997
He's known to the entire crew of the Liberty ship, S.S. John W. Brown, as "Blackie," the man who cheated death four times on the Murmansk run and still goes to sea after six decades.Charles F. Blockston, of Rosedale, Baltimore County, is the third engineer on the Brown, docked at Pier 1, Clinton Street, Canton. Last month, at 78, he helped sail the old freighter up the East Coast to Connecticut."Blackie's" story begins on June 27, 1942, when his ship and 37 others set sail from Iceland to Murmansk in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF AND FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 7, 1997
He's known to the entire crew of the Liberty ship, S.S. John W. Brown, as "Blackie," the man who cheated death four times on the Murmansk run and still goes to sea after six decades.Charles F. Blockston, of Rosedale, Baltimore County, is the third engineer on the Brown, docked at Pier 1, Clinton Street, Canton. Last month, at 78, he helped sail the old freighter up the East Coast to Connecticut."Blackie's" story begins on June 27, 1942, when his ship and 37 others set sail from Iceland to Murmansk in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 1996
MOSCOW -- Maxim's restaurant, the swank international purveyor of belle epoque decadence, could not have chosen a more perfect location for its newest branch. Or worse business partners.Six months after the mahogany-paneled restaurant opened across from the Kremlin, giving Russia's newly moneyed class a place to sip $1,000-a-bottle Bordeaux and eat quail-egg-and-caviar tartlets, Maxim's has belatedly discovered that it is married to the Russian mob.The luxury chain owned by designer Pierre Cardin had assumed its main Russian partner was a legitimate, if rather young, entrepreneur.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The person who terrified the rest of the world by voting for Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky party last week was a youngish man, less-educated and lower-paid than those who chose the parties of reform.This person -- as he emerges from pollsters' profiles -- most likely is not really a fascist now, though Mr. Zhirinovsky himself has been so labeled. But within his soul he harbors all the danger signs.He is a person who will be ardently courted in the coming `D months by the nationalist, anti-reform elements that emerged from the Russian parliamentary election.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 5, 1993
MURMANSK, Russia -- Russia's political leaders are asking a disillusioned people to give them one more chance to create a post-Communist nation.But with crucial elections only a week away, few voters appear ready to make a great leap of faith into the future. Most are approaching next Sunday's vote with more weary resignation than partisan fervor.Yet the stakes are enormous. President Boris N. Yeltsin is asking Russia to elect a new parliament and to approve a new constitution. The results could immeasurably strengthen Mr. Yeltsin or irreparably damage him; they could lead to peaceful evolution of democratic institutions or complete chaos -- and anything in between.
NEWS
October 29, 1992
The restored Liberty ship, S.S. John W. Brown, served as an appropriate backdrop at the Dundalk Marine Terminal early this month as some 250 American veterans of the World War II supply runs to Murmansk received Russian medals.It took 50 years for these graying men to receive the recognition -- and when they did, both the name and the flag of the country they aided had changed."Today Russia has a new flag," Ambassador Vladimir Lukin noted as he stood below his country's tri-color and the star-spangled banner.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
Close to 500 graying American veterans and their friends and relatives gathered yesterday at Dundalk Marine Terminal for a unique ceremony -- to receive Russian commemorative medals for their participation in the World War II convoys to the Arctic port of Murmansk."
NEWS
October 8, 1992
Close to 500 graying American veterans and their friends and relatives gathered yesterday at Dundalk Marine Terminal for a unique ceremony -- to receive Russian commemorative medals for their participation in the World War II convoys to the Arctic port of Murmansk."
NEWS
November 15, 2004
Willie E. "Bill" Blackburn, a decorated merchant marine veteran and a longtime manager for Firestone Tire, died Wednesday from complications after surgery for an aneurysm. He was 81 and lived in Carney. During World War II, Mr. Blackburn was a lieutenant aboard a Liberty ship that carried supplies on the dangerous "Murmansk Run," between Britain and Russia, braving polar ice, storms and submarines to support Russia's efforts in the war against Germany. For his efforts, Mr. Blackburn received the Russian Medal from the Soviet government, which might have failed in its defense against Hitler's armies if it hadn't been for the American aid shipped to the port of Murmansk.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1991
Air so cold it numbed their faces and froze every breath. Ice so thick it took pickaxes and 10-pound mauls to open doors. Ships rolling in single file following the narrow channel cut by an icebreaker, sitting ducks for Nazi U-boat torpedoes and strafing airplanes."
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