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Murder Weapon

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By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Only days before she was to be a key prosecution witness in a 2009 murder trial, a Glen Burnie woman was charged with drug and gun violations, and she may have been telling people that the gun found in her possession was the murder weapon. The revelation led to a delay in the trial of Dominic Richard Sanchez of Baltimore, which had been scheduled to start Monday, until June, at the request of Anne Arundel County prosecutors. Sanchez is charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy in the July 15, 2009, shooting of Lamont Gordon.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
For such a long time, arsenic was the perfect poison. It is odorless, colorless and tasteless, so it's difficult to detect when slipped into a food or beverage. Its effects are gradual and cumulative - deflecting suspicion from the killer. The symptoms of arsenic poisoning mimic those of other diseases common in the 19th century, such as cholera and dysentery. Because the elemental form of arsenic occurs naturally in the environment, it is inexpensive and easily obtained. And until a clever British chemist named James Marsh devised a test in the 1830s, it was impossible to trace the poison in the human body.
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NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
A prosecutor has painted Timothy M. Jones, 20, as the man who set into motion the slaying of a Baltimore schoolteacher by allegedly supplying the murder weapon."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Anne Arundel County prosecutors have dropped first-degree murder charges in a murder-for-hire case, acknowledging that the arrest of their key witness on drug and handgun violations — at one point, she claimed to have the murder weapon — and related problems were too much to overcome. The witness had been arrested in February, only days before Dominic Richard Sanchez was to face trial on charges that he had a friend shoot his girlfriend's estranged husband, Lamont Gordon Jr., in 2009.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | February 4, 1992
Nearly 100 years after Lizzie Borden was accused of savagely killing her father and stepmother in a pique over being served hot mutton soup, a forensic scientist wants to examine the victims' skulls.While a jury found Lizzie not guilty in the deaths, no one else was ever charged in the double homicide committed on the hottest day in the history of Fall River, Mass.James E. Starrs, professor of forensic sciences at George Washington University in Washington, claims the hatchet that was introduced as evidence during Lizzie Borden's trial -- and now in the custody of the Fall River Historical Society -- is not the murder weapon.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
A former security guard and warehouse laborer was sentenced to 30 years in prison yesterday for murdering a Baltimore woman last fall by repeatedly stabbing her and leaving her body in a remote corner of Patapsco State Park near Elkridge.David C. Boser, of the 200 block of S. Vincent St. in Baltimore, said yesterday that the only mistake he was guilty of was in choosing the wrong friends.He said he didn't murder Emma Jean Wantland, 29, of Baltimore."My only guilt lies in loaning my car that night to someone who may have been involved," Boser told Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.Judge Thieme sentenced Boser to life, suspending all but 30 years of the term.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
THE MARYLAND State Police want to scrap a program to collect the ballistic fingerprints of new guns sold in the state because the database hasn't helped solve crimes. Excuse the clichM-i, but the agency is jumping the gun, and legislators should resist its plea. With a National Academy of Science study on this issue expected to be completed by year's end, shutting down the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) would be premature. Maryland and New York are the only two states collecting the unique markings left on shell casings when a gun is fired; those markings are identifiable with a particular gun. After four years and $2.6 million, Maryland has collected more than 53,000 so-called ballistic fingerprints since a 2000 law created the database.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 21, 1998
A 34-year-old South Baltimore man pleaded guilty yesterday to two counts of second-degree murder in the hatchet slayings almost two years ago of his mother and stepfather.Baltimore Circuit Judge John C. Themelis sentenced Dwain Harris to two consecutive 30-year prison terms for the August 1996 killings of Harold and Essie Wainright.Police found the bodies of Harold Wainright, 69, and Essie Wainright, 62, in separate second-floor rooms of their two-story rowhouse in the 1100 block of S. Hanover St., according to court records.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
A 20-year-old New Jersey man was sentenced to 18 years in prison yesterday for the murder of a Glen Burnie man on New Year's morning.Shawn Rauson of Linden, N.J., pleaded guilty June 9 to second-degree murder in the shooting death of 20-year-old Robert Charles Queen Jr., of the 400 block of Darton Court."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Twenty-seven years after Anne L. Bradley was buried by her family, authorities said yesterday they found the killer of the St. John's College student who was found shot to death on the State House grounds. Investigators closed one of the oldest unsolved killings in Annapolis when they announced that Alonzo Henry Johnson Jr., who died in 1983 of a drug overdose in New York City, killed the student in a botched robbery attempt.The 19-year-old woman was shot in the head at point-blank range Nov. 10, 1968, as she returned from an Annapolis pizza shop.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
D'Lana Simmons was found "not criminally responsible" on Tuesday for the beating death of her 66-year-old aunt last year, using the steering wheel locking device known as "The Club" as a murder weapon. "This was a clear case of somebody who was psychotic," Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Gale E. Rasin said, reading from a doctor's report on Simmons' mental status. Simmons struck her aunt, Cecelia Mitchell, approximately 56 times on the evening of Sept. 17, then called 911 for help "stating that she had hurt her aunt and that [the woman]
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Only days before she was to be a key prosecution witness in a 2009 murder trial, a Glen Burnie woman was charged with drug and gun violations, and she may have been telling people that the gun found in her possession was the murder weapon. The revelation led to a delay in the trial of Dominic Richard Sanchez of Baltimore, which had been scheduled to start Monday, until June, at the request of Anne Arundel County prosecutors. Sanchez is charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy in the July 15, 2009, shooting of Lamont Gordon.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
THE MARYLAND State Police want to scrap a program to collect the ballistic fingerprints of new guns sold in the state because the database hasn't helped solve crimes. Excuse the clichM-i, but the agency is jumping the gun, and legislators should resist its plea. With a National Academy of Science study on this issue expected to be completed by year's end, shutting down the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) would be premature. Maryland and New York are the only two states collecting the unique markings left on shell casings when a gun is fired; those markings are identifiable with a particular gun. After four years and $2.6 million, Maryland has collected more than 53,000 so-called ballistic fingerprints since a 2000 law created the database.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Julie Bykowicz and Stephen Kiehl and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Describing John Allen Muhammad as a diabolical and mind- controlling killer, prosecutors told jurors yesterday that the sniper suspect turned a beat-up Chevrolet Caprice into a "war wagon" and a 17-year-old boy into an "instrument of death and destruction" to carry out the sniper attacks last fall. The prosecution and the defense needed almost five hours to deliver their closing arguments yesterday, summing up a month of testimony and evidence that has closely tied the sniper shootings to Muhammad but has not put the murder weapon - a semiautomatic Bushmaster rifle - into his hands.
NEWS
By Jean Guccione and Anna Gorman and Jean Guccione and Anna Gorman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2003
LOS ANGELES - In a setback to prosecutors, a judge threw out part of the capital murder case against Robert Blake yesterday, ruling that the evidence "carries very little weight" toward proving the actor conspired with his handyman to kill his wife. Blake, 70, still faces a murder charge and a possible sentence of life in prison without parole for allegedly shooting Bonny Lee Bakley two years ago outside a Studio City restaurant where they had dined. But the dismissal of a felony charge before trial is rare and could indicate problems ahead for the prosecution, according to criminal defense lawyers who have been following the case.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
A South Baltimore man was convicted last night of ramming a car into a police officer during an October 2001 chase, but he was acquitted of murder and 14 other charges. Gregory Kevin Thomas could be sentenced to 25 years in prison for hitting Southern District police Officer Adam Long with a car - throwing him 20 feet in the air and injuring him - as Long and others were pursuing Thomas in connection with a murder charge. Police believed that Thomas, 22, had killed Darryl "Tank" Dennis during a kidnapping and robbery.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
The impressions from a crescent wrench on the murder victim. Genetic material on a soda bottle. A changing alibi. These are among key pieces of evidence the prosecution is likely to offer against Albert Gustav Givens, whose retrial in the murder of an Arnold woman began yesterday. Lawyers for Givens cautioned jurors not to be swayed by stomach-turning evidence and sympathy for the family of Marlene Kilpatrick, 55, who was killed and sexually assaulted by an assailant she knew well enough to let into her home Jan. 2, 1992.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
D'Lana Simmons was found "not criminally responsible" on Tuesday for the beating death of her 66-year-old aunt last year, using the steering wheel locking device known as "The Club" as a murder weapon. "This was a clear case of somebody who was psychotic," Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Gale E. Rasin said, reading from a doctor's report on Simmons' mental status. Simmons struck her aunt, Cecelia Mitchell, approximately 56 times on the evening of Sept. 17, then called 911 for help "stating that she had hurt her aunt and that [the woman]
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
FREDERICK - The prosecution and lawyers for a Pennsylvania woman on trial in the killing of two Ocean City tourists agree on a host of details, they told the jury during opening statements yesterday. They agree that Martha Crutchley, 51, and Joshua Ford, 32, were lured to an oceanfront penthouse condominium over Memorial Day weekend last year, that they were killed inside, that their dead bodies were dismembered and that their remains ended up in a Delaware landfill. The disagreement is over who committed the murders.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
The impressions from a crescent wrench on the murder victim. Genetic material on a soda bottle. A changing alibi. These are among key pieces of evidence the prosecution is likely to offer against Albert Gustav Givens, whose retrial in the murder of an Arnold woman began yesterday. Lawyers for Givens cautioned jurors not to be swayed by stomach-turning evidence and sympathy for the family of Marlene Kilpatrick, 55, who was killed and sexually assaulted by an assailant she knew well enough to let into her home Jan. 2, 1992.
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