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Murder Rate

NEWS
November 8, 2004
AFTER ALL the gratitudes and platitudes on election night, Mayor Martin O'Malley told Baltimoreans what they needed to hear from an incumbent whose re-election was ensured: "Our job is by no means done. We can do better as a city." No argument there. Five years ago, Mr. O'Malley promised Baltimoreans a safer, cleaner, more livable city. He's created a momentum in those areas and now must build on it. Agency heads and city workers have to be smarter, stronger and more responsive to shake city government from its often-lumbering pace.
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NEWS
By Ray Quintanilla and Ray Quintanilla,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 22, 2004
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - With 120 killings logged in less than seven weeks, slayings in Puerto Rico are running at a pace that could make 2004 the commonwealth's deadliest in a decade. "We recognize the number of murders is way too many," said police Superintendent Augustin Cartagena, in office only three weeks. "We are sending a message to the gang members and drug dealers that this is going to stop." So far this year, an average of five people are slain in Puerto Rico every two days - a rate that, unless it's curbed, could push the number of slayings on the island past 900 this year.
NEWS
May 30, 2000
AS BALTIMORE mourns the loss of another promising life -- dental student Christian Ludwig -- some fall prey to despair. So many guns, so much illegal drug use and child neglect: How, they ask, can anyone believe the murder rate will subside? Operation Safe Neighborhoods believes. Operation Safe Neighborhoods is Baltimore, its church leaders, probation officers, parents, police officers and academics who insist that even the criminals can be recruited to change the culture of violence.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2000
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley called on the city's top prosecutor yesterday to reorganize her office so she can enforce the state's tough gun law and bring to justice violent gunmen. At the same time, the mayor said he was prepared to free extra funds for additional staff as long as State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy focuses on ways to reduce the city's persistently high homicide rate. He urged Jessamy to ensure that those charged with using a gun to carry out their crimes receive the state's mandatory minimum sentence of five years behind bars.
NEWS
December 30, 1999
DECEMBER is not yet over, but Baltimore's homicide toll has exceeded 300 for the 10th consecutive year.That grisly number makes Baltimore one of America's deadliest cities. New York, despite nearly 12 times the population, has just over twice as many murders. Even more startling is the comparison with Baltimore County. Its population is larger than the city's but it could end this year with fewer than 30 homicides. In more than two dozen editorials since February, The Sun has been demanding that top city and state officials take emergency action to stop this bloodshed.
NEWS
December 10, 1999
MAYOR Martin O'Malley has started dismantling former Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's reforms. The first to go -- to the jubilation of the police union and rank-and-file -- is the controversial personnel rotation policy.Transferring officers regularly in and out of specialized units was among Mr. Frazier's attempts to weaken the police union and give minorities and women opportunities for advancement. But that policy ended up wrecking the homicide unit. Rather than go back to less prestigious patrol assignments, many seasoned homicide detectives resigned -- and found high demand for their expertise in suburban police departments.
NEWS
November 20, 1999
BALTIMORE'S homicide rate -- among the highest in the nation -- could be headed for another record.An escalation of killings since September has erased a downward trend earlier in the year. If this rate persists, the city could end up with 300 or more slayings for the ninth consecutive year.This is an intolerable situation.But instead of being angry and helping police stop this bloodshed, drug-infested neighborhoods tolerate gun-toting hoodlums.A wider sense of outrage? Forget about it. In May, the Greater Baltimore Committee pledged to work toward halving the region's homicide rate by 2002.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
This is an excerpt of a speech by John Morton III to the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, which was held on May 26. Mr. Morton, president of NationsBank Corp.'s Mid-Atlantic Banking Group, is the incoming GBC chairman.TONIGHT, we embark on our next challenge and that will be to significantly reduce the number of murders and violent crimes committed in our region.I became even more concerned about the seriousness of the situation after numerous conversations with our directors and many of you. To a person, the high crime rate was consistently identified as the No. 1 problem and always, named as one of the top two.I also had the opportunity to listen to corporate relocation consultants and numerous public officials, throughout a five-week seminar series arranged for the GBC board by Donald P. Hutchinson, GBC's president.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Declaring that crime is bad for business, the incoming chairman of the Greater Baltimore Committee is to announce tonight that a major goal of the business group will be to halve the region's homicide rate by 2002.John Morton III, president of NationsBank Corp.'s Mid-Atlantic Banking Group, is to make the announcement when he is named GBC's chairman at the group's annual meeting.In Baltimore and the surrounding five counties, there were 356 homicide last year. In Baltimore City alone, there were 314 homicides last year and 312 in 1997, making it the fourth deadliest city in the country per capita, behind Gary, Ind., New Orleans and Washington.
NEWS
April 9, 1999
BALTIMORE ended the first quarter of 1999 with a 25 percent decline in homicides. Even though this is still a tentative trend, it is tremendous news. With the annual number of homicides exceeding 300 during each of the past nine years, Baltimore has been one of the most lethal cities in America -- at a time when the national murder rate has steadily declined.Reasons for Baltimore now joining this decline are not obvious. Swings in crime patterns seldom are. But since an overwhelming majority of killings in Baltimore are drug-related, it may be that violence associated with the crack trade has begun to level off. This has happened over the past couple of years in other cities, where the crack epidemic hit earlier.
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