Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMurder Rate
IN THE NEWS

Murder Rate

NEWS
By Justin Fenton | January 10, 2010
Radio host Ed Norris, a former Baltimore police commissioner and superintendent of the Maryland State Police, knows what it's like to be on a force amid political change. "There's always turmoil, and it trickles down to the streets," Norris said. He said that he believes a Rawlings-Blake mayoral administration might be wise to conduct an audit of the Police Department's crime statistics to see whether the numbers are giving commanders an accurate look at crime in Baltimore.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 31, 2009
It was disheartening that the top story in Tuesday's Baltimore Sun was not the rising homicide rate but lowering assessments. The lack of focus on the fundamental issue of violence hinders progress in the city by pretending it isn't there. Presenting the murders as isolated incidents rather than part of a larger, systemic problem does not help us understand, analyze or stop the violence. The murder rate, about half the rate of New York City - which has 8.5 million, or 13 times the number of people in Baltimore and which announced today the fewest homicides on record - should be a central issue for all of Baltimore and front-page news.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | November 12, 2007
The Democratic theme song is "Happy Days Are Here Again," and nowhere do Democrats think that axiom applies better than in the realm of fighting crime. They recall that thanks to legislation passed in 1994, Bill Clinton put 100,000 new cops on the street, and the result was an abatement of violence. Give Democrats their way, they suggest, and we can repeat that success. Leading the charge is Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, who sponsored that bill and is pushing legislation to hire another 50,000 officers, at a cost of $3.6 billion over six years, under the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 31, 2007
Two years later, too little has changed in New Orleans. Residents of the Crescent City's poor neighborhoods were abandoned long before Hurricane Katrina, said Barack Obama, then a newly elected senator from Illinois, shortly after the storm hit. They've been abandoned again, judging by the city's sluggish pace of recovery. As presidential candidates returned to the Big Easy for anniversary photo opportunities, they found plenty of visibly bad news to use as backdrops. Across the Gulf Coast, you can tell which neighborhoods are recovering by how much household income they have.
NEWS
April 16, 2007
Kudos to Cynthia Tucker for her column on the tragic state of affairs in this country on gun control ("The bloody results of America's bizarre love affair with guns," Opinion * Commentary, April 9). Ms. Tucker is right: We lack anything resembling a sane policy on guns. I expect The Sun will be inundated with letters making the same tired and flawed arguments about how "guns don't kill people; people do," and that our Second Amendment rights must be protected. And of course people, not weapons, instigate violence.
NEWS
January 11, 2006
No significant drop in city homicide rate The Sun's editorial "Staying focused" (Jan. 4) is nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to bolster Mayor Martin O'Malley's run for governor. The editors say that seven fewer murders in 2005 "may seem unimpressive," but go on to try to convince readers that this was, in fact, a significant reduction, and that the mayor's leadership has led to big reductions in violent crimes. The fact of the matter is that the city has not made appreciable progress in reducing the homicide rate since the 1990s, when the murder numbers were at their highest.
NEWS
By Ben Pillow and Ben Pillow,SPECIAL TO BALTIMORESUN.COM | March 9, 2005
The police department's annual crime report released today indicates that Howard County's homicide rate is at its lowest point since 1997, authorities said. But the news came as detectives charged a 25-year-old woman in the death of her friend, whose body was found this morning in a parking lot off Columbia Road. According to police, 31-year-old Natasha A. Bacchus of Stewartstown, Pa., was visiting her friend Melissa Harton in Columbia. Investigators said that after 2 a.m., the women got into a fight at the entrance of Centennial Park, and Harton strangled Bacchus.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
REVELATIONS that a political operative of the governor was spreading rumors about the private life of Mayor Martin O'Malley, and the mayor's comments likening the effects of federal budget cutbacks on cities to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, weren't the only developments that put Baltimore in the national spotlight last week. The city's horrendous homicide surge was also making news from coast to coast - or, at least, on both coasts. Two of the country's most prominent newspapers - The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times - took note of the city's mounting body count with extensive stories.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.