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Murder Rate

NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
For the first time in years, Baltimore is no longer among the nation's five deadliest cities, according to statistics for 2011 compiled by the FBI and released Monday. Baltimore saw a 12 percent decline in murders last year, with the total dropping below 200 for the first time since 1978. Taking population changes into account, the murder rate per 100,000 people was the lowest since the late 1980s. Meanwhile, the number of reported rapes jumped significantly, to levels not seen since 2000.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Angela Holland seems to know just about everyone in her North Baltimore neighborhood. She jokes with a guy hanging out of the window of an apartment high-rise. She consoles the deli counter man at the East 25th Street corner store, who's distraught about losing his mother two years ago. Without saying a word, she slips a few quarters to a man sitting on a stoop, who in turn hands her a cigarette. These folks know her. And some of the people in this neighborhood, she suspects, also know who killed her son, 22-year-old Jerry Isaac.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III, the longest-serving commissioner in the city's recent history and who oversaw steep declines in the city's murder rate, is stepping down, the mayor's office announced. Bealefeld's retirement date is effective August 1, the sources said, but he still stay on and oversee a transition. A senior aide to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Bealefeld informed of her of his decision today and said he wanted to spend more time with his family.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
The Sun should be commended for publishing such an extensive article on the "right to carry" laws in Maryland and putting it in clear terms that anyone can understand ("Gun laws' sketchy effect," March 11). The bottom line, according to the academics, is that restrictions or a lack of restrictions make no difference. However, it's complicated because on one hand, "the right to carry" concealed guns does decrease the murder rates and on the other hand, "the right to carry" will "slightly increase the number of aggravated assaults.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
In D.C., Chief Cathy L. Lanier is getting some heat for what the Washington Post reports is a "statistical mishmash" regarding the Metropolitan Police Department's sparkling homicide clearance rate of 94 percent of its 108 killings. As it turns out, many of the closed cases are from previous years: In Baltimore, this revelation is not new or surprising, but it's worth reminding the public how the process works. First, here's some snippets from the Post article: A 94 percent closure rate would mean that detectives solved 102 of them.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Peter Hermann 's story on Baltimore murders accurately described the challenges the city faces even as violence there has dropped ("Baltimore murder victims, suspects share ties to criminal justice system," Jan. 2). However, the progress has also allowed Gov. Martin O'Malley to declare that his Violence Prevention Initiative was responsible for the decline - an overreaching claim that flies in the face of data. Baltimore's murder rate has been decreasing for more than a decade, closely tracking a national trend, and it began dropping long before the governor's initiative was launched.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Despite a nearly across-the-board decline in crime, Baltimore maintained the fifth-highest homicide rate in the country last year, according to preliminary data released Monday by the FBI. Nationwide, crime dropped for the fourth straight year, continuing to defy predictions that crime would rise during a recession. Violent crime declined 5.5 percent last year compared with 2009, while property crimes dropped 2.8 percent. In Baltimore, violent crime declined 3.6 percent, and the city ranked seventh in violent crime per 100,000 residents.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
According to a recent filing by Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, in response to the pending case Woolard vs. Sheridan, pertaining to Marylanders' Second Amendment rights, he points to the high handgun violence and murder rate in Baltimore as logical and sound reasoning for denying the rest of Maryland their right to carry a concealed firearm for their personal protection. He further contends that the state is not denying our rights, since all Marylanders can legally open carry a long gun (rifle)
NEWS
May 13, 2010
All Marylanders should note the good news about Maryland's 30-year low in violent crime. ("This is progress," May 11). Even more striking is the 12 percent reduction in the murder rate. Many factors come into play to reduce crime and violence. Local law enforcement certainly deserves much credit, but so does the leadership at the top of our state. Maryland has been among the top 10 most violent states for far too long. This is changing thanks to effective, statewide strategies fostering cooperation between local, state and federal crime reduction efforts.
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