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Murder Rate

NEWS
By Justin Fenton | January 10, 2010
Radio host Ed Norris, a former Baltimore police commissioner and superintendent of the Maryland State Police, knows what it's like to be on a force amid political change. "There's always turmoil, and it trickles down to the streets," Norris said. He said that he believes a Rawlings-Blake mayoral administration might be wise to conduct an audit of the Police Department's crime statistics to see whether the numbers are giving commanders an accurate look at crime in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By JAMES D. DILTS | May 4, 1995
Baltimore over the past few years has been unsettled by an unprecedented wave of murders and urban violence. Yet the city has survived a previous violent era in its history, and there are encouraging signs that the present cycle of drug-related crime has crested.Baltimore's current murder rate is 32 per 100,000 people, based on 224 murder cases closed in Circuit Court last year and an estimated 1994 population of 703,000. In addition, there were nearly 18,000 cases of assault and battery in Baltimore in 1994, according to District Court figures.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Is it fear of Maryland's law-abiding citizens actually figuring out the truth that prompts the liberal media to pass on more flawed studies as fact? The Sun's recent editorial ( "Gun control works," Feb. 20) attempts to convince us that "cherry picked" data provides clear proof that gun control works. I find a few problems with this conclusion myself. First of all, this study was performed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. We all know that one of Michael Bloomberg's key objectives is advocating for stricter gun control, so why would we expect anyone at the school to perform an unbiased study?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
A group seen as Baltimore's next generation of hard-core criminals swaggered into a city elementary school rimmed with armed officers and quietly listened to an effort by police to use words to stop violence.The young men and handful of women, all convicted on drug and gun charges, went to the Wednesday night "gang call-in" because their parole terms required it. They sat in stoic silence, forbidden from talking or asking questions. They stared at mug shots of their friends.It was the third such session police have held since last year in different parts of the city -- one of several strategies they are trying to bring down a murder rate that made Baltimore one of the deadliest cities in the nation last year.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
When President Obama addressed the families and colleagues of victims of the mass shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington last week, he lamented what he called a sense of "creeping resignation" among Americans toward the epidemic gun violence that has taken so many innocent lives in recent years. "Our hearts are broken again," he said, yet we seem unwilling to do what is necessary to prevent a recurrence of these shocking tragedies — and so, inevitably, they will happen again.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | November 12, 2007
The Democratic theme song is "Happy Days Are Here Again," and nowhere do Democrats think that axiom applies better than in the realm of fighting crime. They recall that thanks to legislation passed in 1994, Bill Clinton put 100,000 new cops on the street, and the result was an abatement of violence. Give Democrats their way, they suggest, and we can repeat that success. Leading the charge is Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware, who sponsored that bill and is pushing legislation to hire another 50,000 officers, at a cost of $3.6 billion over six years, under the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- This was a city that seemed to have all the answers.Fortune 500 companies thrive in an atmosphere of Scandinavian-style social liberalism. Stillwater lakes give woodsy neighborhoods a fairy-tale look. Even the brutal Upper Midwest winters are made manageable, with elaborate glass skyways to protect downtown pedestrians.It is a way of life, the Minneapolis Star Tribune once noted, that boosters regard as "superior to that in most places on earth."But lately, this idyllic image has been shattered by violence, with gang turf wars and drive-by shootings on streets where children play games of kick-the-can.
NEWS
By David Simon | December 24, 1990
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun reporte incorrectly that 296 people had been murdered in Baltimore in 1990. In fact, the number of violent deaths officially classified as murders at that time was 294, according to the police.The Sun regrets the error.A pair of shootings early yesterday pushed Baltimore's 1990 murder count near the 300 mark -- a level of violence that the city has not encountered in almost two decades.Yesterday's slayings -- one in an argument over a woman, the other in apparent retaliation for the theft of drugs -- were the 295th and 296th of the year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
When Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts appeared at a recent town hall, a woman stood to ask about police brutality, a touchy topic for both residents and officers. She said she worried for her young nephew, who was frequently stopped by police. Batts' 10-minute answer ranged from the personal to the practical. He talked about his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, drawing laughs about the fried bologna sandwiches his family ate to survive. He explained why people must sit cross-legged on curbs for officer safety, but understood police interactions can be demeaning for those detained.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
Last week's report that Baltimore's population continues to shrink was not good news but hardly surprising, given the city's history. The drop was modest compared to the residential losses Baltimore has experienced in years past, but more importantly, the U.S. Census statistics contained ample evidence of a potentially brighter future ahead. That's because many U.S. cities are on the rebound. The same Census figures that show Baltimore lost about 1,500 people in the year ending last July also revealed that more than half of the country's 51 largest metropolitan areas saw greater growth within their city limits than in their suburbs.
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