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Murder Rate

NEWS
July 25, 2013
Why is it that nobody sees anything when someone, man, woman or child, is gunned down on Baltimore's streets? In a city where it is the norm for people to sit on their porches late into the night to escape the heat, the only violence people see are the ones where police are involved ("Witnesses of man's death sought at vigil," July 24). These are the same people who complain about the safety of their streets but thwart any effort to enforce the laws and make lawbreakers into victims.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
With three more murders over the weekend , Baltimore has virtually no chance of continued improvement in the city's homicide rate.  There have been 187 people killed so far this year, as of Sunday. Last year Baltimore saw 196 murders, the lowest total since the late 1970s and, adjusting for population change, the lowest murder rate since the late 1980s.  The city would need to see nine homicides from this point on to match last year's number. But just once since 1970 has the city recorded less than 10 homicides in the month of November or December, let alone nine total to close the year.  A positive takeaway for this year would be a continued decline in the number of non-fatal shootings, which were down 5 percent as of the most recent update on Oct. 27. If that holds, Baltimore would record about 360 non-fatal shootings this year, compared with 651 just five years ago and 419 in 2010.  jfenton@baltsun.com
NEWS
May 31, 2013
Another innocent child murdered in Baltimore is a crying shame. Baltimore came in fifth place nationally for its high murder rate. Maryland came in fourth place among the 50 states for the number of police officers killed (six) in the line of duty. Getting tough on second-offenders leaves innocent children and adults in more dangerous crossfire between criminals. If you chose to intentionally shoot another person, then you should expect the consequence is to spend a very long time in jail.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
AFTER ALL the gratitudes and platitudes on election night, Mayor Martin O'Malley told Baltimoreans what they needed to hear from an incumbent whose re-election was ensured: "Our job is by no means done. We can do better as a city." No argument there. Five years ago, Mr. O'Malley promised Baltimoreans a safer, cleaner, more livable city. He's created a momentum in those areas and now must build on it. Agency heads and city workers have to be smarter, stronger and more responsive to shake city government from its often-lumbering pace.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | August 31, 2007
Two years later, too little has changed in New Orleans. Residents of the Crescent City's poor neighborhoods were abandoned long before Hurricane Katrina, said Barack Obama, then a newly elected senator from Illinois, shortly after the storm hit. They've been abandoned again, judging by the city's sluggish pace of recovery. As presidential candidates returned to the Big Easy for anniversary photo opportunities, they found plenty of visibly bad news to use as backdrops. Across the Gulf Coast, you can tell which neighborhoods are recovering by how much household income they have.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
A spate of violence in the city continued with a daylight shooting that left three people dead inside a West Baltimore apartment, as members of the City Council on Tuesday pressed police commanders to address a rise in killings and robberies. The Fulton Avenue shootings took the life of two women and a man, the latest in an explosion of violence in West Baltimore, which has already seen 15 murders this year, half of its total for all of 2012. Ten of those killings have occurred in just a 12-block stretch southwest of Druid Hill Park and near Mondawmin Mall.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | January 10, 2010
Radio host Ed Norris, a former Baltimore police commissioner and superintendent of the Maryland State Police, knows what it's like to be on a force amid political change. "There's always turmoil, and it trickles down to the streets," Norris said. He said that he believes a Rawlings-Blake mayoral administration might be wise to conduct an audit of the Police Department's crime statistics to see whether the numbers are giving commanders an accurate look at crime in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 11, 2006
No significant drop in city homicide rate The Sun's editorial "Staying focused" (Jan. 4) is nothing more than a thinly veiled attempt to bolster Mayor Martin O'Malley's run for governor. The editors say that seven fewer murders in 2005 "may seem unimpressive," but go on to try to convince readers that this was, in fact, a significant reduction, and that the mayor's leadership has led to big reductions in violent crimes. The fact of the matter is that the city has not made appreciable progress in reducing the homicide rate since the 1990s, when the murder numbers were at their highest.
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