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Murder Rate

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NEWS
May 29, 2013
I just read that in Baltimore, the city that bleeds, there were 12 shootings over a period of four days ("12 shot in four days in city," May 28). Let me see now, at the rate of three per day, over the period of 365 days, that would add up to 1,095! But the residents of Baltimore shouldn't panic, for two very good reasons. First, we all know that shootings at the rate of there per day most likely are not sustainable as Baltimore's criminal culture simply cannot maintain that pace, or can it?
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
When Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts appeared at a recent town hall, a woman stood to ask about police brutality, a touchy topic for both residents and officers. She said she worried for her young nephew, who was frequently stopped by police. Batts' 10-minute answer ranged from the personal to the practical. He talked about his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles, drawing laughs about the fried bologna sandwiches his family ate to survive. He explained why people must sit cross-legged on curbs for officer safety, but understood police interactions can be demeaning for those detained.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and other top members of the agency have visited counterparts in Chicago to observe their crime-fighting strategy, the latest in a series of efforts to adopt law enforcement practices around the country. Chicago since 2012 has led the U.S. in total homicides, though its 413 murders in 2013 were a five-decade low and the city's per-capita murder rate is less than half that of Baltimore.  Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy hit back against skeptics in an interview with the Chicago Sun-Times published Wednesday , saying his crime-reduction plans are working.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
The Sun should be commended for publishing such an extensive article on the "right to carry" laws in Maryland and putting it in clear terms that anyone can understand ("Gun laws' sketchy effect," March 11). The bottom line, according to the academics, is that restrictions or a lack of restrictions make no difference. However, it's complicated because on one hand, "the right to carry" concealed guns does decrease the murder rates and on the other hand, "the right to carry" will "slightly increase the number of aggravated assaults.
NEWS
By H.B. Johnson Jr | February 18, 1993
Too emotional teen-ager . . .Live wire that splitsa smut-thick sky.Sees a capital punishment, then kills.And we dare ask why.See this pain-soaked child . . .Grab men and women,Hold them dear,Make them fat and frightened,Cook them in the chair.Murder rate, murder rate . . .Back and forth again.A wind that turns around at night;Will it ever end?
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she is concerned about the city's uptick in murders this year following a record decline in 2011.  "I'm certainly not satisfied with it," Rawlings-Blake said at a news conference after Wednesday's Board of Estimates meeting. "I don't want to go back. It's not the goal of my administration to become a more violent city. My goal is to become an exceptionally safe city, one of the safest big cities in the country. I won't be satisfied until that's where we are. " Rawlings-Blake said she is discussing with Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts "ways that we can increase enforcement and deployment to bring that down.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
For the first time in years, Baltimore has fallen out of the top five in national murder rate, according to statistics for 2011 compiled by the FBI and released Monday. Baltimore saw a 12 percent decline in murders last year, with the total dropping below 200 for the first time since 1978. Taking population changes into account, the murder rate per 100,000 people was the lowest since the late 1980s. Meanwhile, the number of reported rapes jumped significantly, to levels not seen since 2000.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
Peter Hermann 's story on Baltimore murders accurately described the challenges the city faces even as violence there has dropped ("Baltimore murder victims, suspects share ties to criminal justice system," Jan. 2). However, the progress has also allowed Gov. Martin O'Malley to declare that his Violence Prevention Initiative was responsible for the decline - an overreaching claim that flies in the face of data. Baltimore's murder rate has been decreasing for more than a decade, closely tracking a national trend, and it began dropping long before the governor's initiative was launched.
NEWS
By Sherrilyn Ifill | January 2, 2014
In a television interview, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts offered reassurance that the city's stubbornly high murder rate is not a cause for concern among "everyday citizens. " Instead, Mr. Batts has explained, more than 80 percent of the murders are gang member on gang member, drug-dealer on drug-dealer.  The chief's remarks may be factually accurate, but they also reinforce a view that underlies the response to inner city violence in too many American cities - the idea that violent crime and murder is unworthy of our outrage so long as the victims are gang members or participants in the drug trade.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Is it fear of Maryland's law-abiding citizens actually figuring out the truth that prompts the liberal media to pass on more flawed studies as fact? The Sun's recent editorial ( "Gun control works," Feb. 20) attempts to convince us that "cherry picked" data provides clear proof that gun control works. I find a few problems with this conclusion myself. First of all, this study was performed by the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. We all know that one of Michael Bloomberg's key objectives is advocating for stricter gun control, so why would we expect anyone at the school to perform an unbiased study?
NEWS
By Sherrilyn Ifill | January 2, 2014
In a television interview, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts offered reassurance that the city's stubbornly high murder rate is not a cause for concern among "everyday citizens. " Instead, Mr. Batts has explained, more than 80 percent of the murders are gang member on gang member, drug-dealer on drug-dealer.  The chief's remarks may be factually accurate, but they also reinforce a view that underlies the response to inner city violence in too many American cities - the idea that violent crime and murder is unworthy of our outrage so long as the victims are gang members or participants in the drug trade.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Homicide detectives gathered under a West Baltimore street lamp Wednesday evening and studied a pool of blood from a gunshot wound to the head of a 21-year-old man. As police notified his family and began to canvass the area, a spokesman assigned the victim a number: 199. It has been two years since Baltimore's yearly homicide count dropped below the symbolic threshold of 200 for the first time in decades. The achievement has proved difficult to repeat. Killings increased last year and are on track to do so again in 2013.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
We will try not to judge too harshly those on the Baltimore City Council who are supporting a crackdown on panhandling — just as they should not judge too harshly those who are doing the panhandling. A poverty of ideas is just another form of poverty. Not to put too fine a point on it, but Baltimore already has a decade-old law on the books that prohibits aggressive panhandling. Examples of outlawed behavior include refusing to take no for an answer, following or touching people on the street or swearing at them.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
When President Obama addressed the families and colleagues of victims of the mass shooting at the U.S. Navy Yard in Washington last week, he lamented what he called a sense of "creeping resignation" among Americans toward the epidemic gun violence that has taken so many innocent lives in recent years. "Our hearts are broken again," he said, yet we seem unwilling to do what is necessary to prevent a recurrence of these shocking tragedies — and so, inevitably, they will happen again.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris recently suggested that, rather than focusing on crisis pregnancy centers, "maybe the time, money, and attention of the mayor and city solicitor would be much better spent dealing with the increasing carnage on the streets of Baltimore" ( "City should stop attacking pregnancy centers," July 28). Lately, this seems to be a common refrain for conservatives: They need to stop complaining about ____ (insert any injustice in this space) and worry about all of the violence in their community.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | July 2, 1991
Baltimore's murder rate continued its steady increase during the first half of 1991, when 148 persons were killed -- 15 more than during the same period last year.The violence fell particularly hard on the city's black community: 9 of 10 of Baltimore's homicide victims during the first half of the year were black, and one third of those killed in the city were black men between the ages of 20 and 29."It's just not something we can stop before it occurs," said Dennis S. Hill, a Police Department spokesman.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
Why is it that nobody sees anything when someone, man, woman or child, is gunned down on Baltimore's streets? In a city where it is the norm for people to sit on their porches late into the night to escape the heat, the only violence people see are the ones where police are involved ("Witnesses of man's death sought at vigil," July 24). These are the same people who complain about the safety of their streets but thwart any effort to enforce the laws and make lawbreakers into victims.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
Letter writer Ron Wirsing was absolutely correct in ascertaining that the murder rate is lower in states that adopt the stand-your - ground self defense law ("Zimmerman trial had nothing to do with race," July 17). And the reason is pretty simple. In those states, when an armed man kills an unarmed man and pleads self-defense and walks, it's not called murder anymore. It's called open season. Thomas J. Snyder
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