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By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama won approval yesterday for a historic reversal of his Socialist Party's pacifist policies, but the victory dealt a severe blow to party unity.A special party convention backed Mr. Murayama's declarations supporting the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, recognizing Japan's armed forces as constitutional, accepting nuclear power generation, and acknowledging the national anthem and national flag.These declarations, which Mr. Murayama made in July after forming a coalition with the Liberal Democrats and the splinter New Party Harbinger, reversed positions that had been the Socialists' bedrock for four decades.
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NEWS
January 20, 1996
AT LAST JAPAN has a prime minister who is good at kendo, the martial art of dueling with bamboo swords. The newly formed Japanese government is the same as the old, with musical chairs. Its policies will not differ. Some personalities will, notably that of the prime minister, replacing the self-effacing Socialist, Tomiichi Murayama, with Liberal Democratic Party chief Ryutaro Hashimoto, who is a vigorous, blunt-talking representative of a more assertive Japan.He is best known to Americans as a tough adversary in the automobile trade talks last year.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 15, 1995
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama of Japan did yesterday what no other Japanese leader has dared to do: He extended his "heartfelt apology" for atrocities his country committed in World War II."In the hope that no such mistake be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology," Mr. Murayama said.His speech is sure to provoke strident debate throughout the nation, for his words were clearer than those of any other Japanese official trying to address Japan's war role.
NEWS
January 6, 1996
THE FALL of Japan's coalition government is not likely to disrupt the controversial bail-out of mortgage-lending companies, President Clinton's visit in April or anything else. The Socialist prime minister was worn out after the Kobe earthquake, cult terrorism in the Tokyo subway, the collapse of real estate, the banking crisis, the protests over U.S. troops in Okinawa but mostly from championing the Liberal Democratic Party policies he had always opposed.The once-and-future ruling party needed to get its act together.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1994
TOKYO -- Socialist Party leader Tomiichi Murayama attempted to defuse yesterday what he acknowledged to be "pervasive anxiety" about his surprise election as prime minister of Japan.He noted that the the word socialism no longer appears in the Socialist Party's platform."The party has changed with the times," he said.Into what, however, remains unclear.That was one of many murky areas he left unexplained at a news conference yesterday.A week ago, as merely another member of the opposition, he seemed to support a dissolution of parliament and new elections.
NEWS
June 16, 1995
President Clinton refused to back down yesterday in a bitter dispute with Japan about its restrictions on the sale of U.S.-made cars, a trade fight that overshadowed the opening of a summit of the world's seven richest nations in Halifax, Nova Scotia.Mr. Clinton said that he and Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama failed to reach agreement during a 60-minute meeting about their countries' trade policies.Article, 3A
NEWS
August 17, 1995
The apology for Japan's wartime atrocities a half century ago made by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama has already produced good results. Asian governments have welcomed it. Japanese citizens have begun a long-suppressed national dialogue on the rights and wrongs of it. Mr. Murayama has started a long-delayed healing process with Asian neighbors that Japan conquered and destroyed in the 1930s and '40s."
FEATURES
By Rika Yamamoto and Rika Yamamoto,Special to The Sun | October 29, 1994
Tokyo -- Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's ratings in the polls are poor, but the 70-year-old Socialist Party chairman is a hit where capitalists on the other side of the political spectrum say it really counts: the cash register.First came the $18 Murayama stuffed doll -- the 2,000 initially produced have already been sold, and they officially go on the market only next week. Hearing the plunk of yen if not the thump of voters' hearts, a raft of Murayama memorabilia has now gone on the market.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 22, 1995
TOKYO -- As sound trucks roam the streets and postersaccost pedestrians with gleaming images of eager candidates, the central figure in elections set for tomorrow is not even on the ballots.Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama may not be formally competing -- voters will choose only members of Parliament's upper chamber -- but a poor showing for his Socialist Party could force his resignation. And that, in turn, could lead to the collapse of the governing coalition of three political parties, and then a political realignment.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1995
TOKYO -- The Japanese government raised new questions yesterday about its contrition for past militarism by declaring that its annexation of Korea in 1910 was legal and was not forced on the Korean people.The latest assertions by Japan's official government spokesman are likely to add to anger in Asia at Japan's reluctance to apologize for wartime brutality. This remains a sensitive issue in the region.The statement from Tokyo is as if the German government were to declare that its invasion of France during World War II had been legal and amicable, because agreements were signed between Germany and the puppet government in Vichy.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 1995
TOKYO -- In a controversial move pitting public safety against religious freedom, Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama yesterday approved the use of a Cold War law to disband Aum Supreme Truth, the religious cult accused of launching a deadly poisonous gas attack on Tokyo subways.The approval by Mr. Murayama -- whose Socialist Party has long opposed the anti-subversive law as a danger to democratic freedoms -- gave police the go-ahead to seize the cult's assets and forbid members from practicing their religion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1995
TOKYO -- The Japanese government raised new questions yesterday about its contrition for past militarism by declaring that its annexation of Korea in 1910 was legal and was not forced on the Korean people.The latest assertions by Japan's official government spokesman are likely to add to anger in Asia at Japan's reluctance to apologize for wartime brutality. This remains a sensitive issue in the region.The statement from Tokyo is as if the German government were to declare that its invasion of France during World War II had been legal and amicable, because agreements were signed between Germany and the puppet government in Vichy.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
HALF A century out, the last big commotion over World War II slides by. How much care will oncoming descendants give to the mementos of its aging or deceased veterans?Maryland has no central depository for the preservation and study of WWII records, although several institutions have specialties. The letters of Calvert C. McCabe to his mother in Baltimore, while serving in the European Theater of Operations, are one recent Maryland Historical Society acquisition.Other families may want to consider similar donations.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
The apology for Japan's wartime atrocities a half century ago made by Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama has already produced good results. Asian governments have welcomed it. Japanese citizens have begun a long-suppressed national dialogue on the rights and wrongs of it. Mr. Murayama has started a long-delayed healing process with Asian neighbors that Japan conquered and destroyed in the 1930s and '40s."
NEWS
August 16, 1995
If he has done nothing else for his country, Tomiichi Murayama, the weak Socialist prime minister of Japan, has begun a long-delayed process of healing with Asian neighbors that Japan conquered and destroyed in the 1930s and '40s."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 15, 1995
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama of Japan did yesterday what no other Japanese leader has dared to do: He extended his "heartfelt apology" for atrocities his country committed in World War II."In the hope that no such mistake be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology," Mr. Murayama said.His speech is sure to provoke strident debate throughout the nation, for his words were clearer than those of any other Japanese official trying to address Japan's war role.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
HALF A century out, the last big commotion over World War II slides by. How much care will oncoming descendants give to the mementos of its aging or deceased veterans?Maryland has no central depository for the preservation and study of WWII records, although several institutions have specialties. The letters of Calvert C. McCabe to his mother in Baltimore, while serving in the European Theater of Operations, are one recent Maryland Historical Society acquisition.Other families may want to consider similar donations.
NEWS
May 13, 1995
It doesn't matter much if Italy cannot produce a government. Italy goes along with the European Union on policy and its civil servants run the place. When Japan cannot, it matters. Japan is the other economic superpower.LTC After two years of political crisis, Japan does have a government, but only of an unworkable coalition. Tomiichi Murayama, the prime minister, is 71, without executive experience and the leader of the Socialist Party which is repudiated by most Japanese. It holds only 69 seats in the 511-member Lower House.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 22, 1995
TOKYO -- As sound trucks roam the streets and postersaccost pedestrians with gleaming images of eager candidates, the central figure in elections set for tomorrow is not even on the ballots.Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama may not be formally competing -- voters will choose only members of Parliament's upper chamber -- but a poor showing for his Socialist Party could force his resignation. And that, in turn, could lead to the collapse of the governing coalition of three political parties, and then a political realignment.
NEWS
June 29, 1995
It was grand campaign crisis management. President Clinton's resolute stand averted the damaging trade war with Japan that he had threatened. Having talked tough, he claimed a "great victory" yesterday. The terms appear to open the Japanese market somewhat and to increase the American labor component of cars sold in America. Mr. Clinton stole Ross Perot's third-party thunder. If only the election were this year.By next year, the pattern of going to the brink with Japan in all manner of trade negotiations and resolving them by showy compromise at the final hour will be remembered, while this particular episode may have been forgotten in the general blur of subsequent events.
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