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By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 6, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- Before there was "Nomo Mania," there was "Mashy Madness."Not that you ever heard much about it. "Mashy Madness" happened 30 years ago, without any shoe contracts or nightly ESPN highlights or officially licensed "Mashy Madness" merchandise. Nope, none of that.Instead, there was just Masanori "Mashy" Murakami, a brave 19-year-old pitcher who flew across the Pacific Ocean and made history.Murakami, a relief pitcher for the Giants, was the first Japanese national to play in the major leagues.
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NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 2006
Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman: 25 Stories Haruki Murakami Alfred A. Knopf / 352 pages / $25.00 In this extraordinary new story collection by the Japanese writer Haruki Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Kafka on the Shore), reality is ever in danger of breaking loose of its moorings. People are sucked up into a void or drown in an unforgiving wave. Characters descend into wells. People are pursued by dark shadows. Man-eating cats, or morally indifferent cats, stalk the landscape. No matter the mayhem, there are never "reasons, causes."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ariella Budick and Ariella Budick,NEWSDAY | October 12, 2003
NEW YORK - Here are a few snapshots of contemporary culture: The Marshall Field's catalog features a silk dressing gown with the Superman logo for $59.95. Nearly 19 million grown-up Americans are regular viewers of SpongeBob Squarepants. J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter saga has proved to be a literary sales phenomenon - among adults. And through today, the plaza at Rockefeller Center is surmounted by a 30-foot cartoon creature with a tapering head and an oversupply of limbs. His name is Tongari-kun, or Mr. Pointy, and he is the brainchild of Takashi Murakami, the hyper-hip Japanese artist who has become an international celebrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ariella Budick and Ariella Budick,NEWSDAY | October 12, 2003
NEW YORK - Here are a few snapshots of contemporary culture: The Marshall Field's catalog features a silk dressing gown with the Superman logo for $59.95. Nearly 19 million grown-up Americans are regular viewers of SpongeBob Squarepants. J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter saga has proved to be a literary sales phenomenon - among adults. And through today, the plaza at Rockefeller Center is surmounted by a 30-foot cartoon creature with a tapering head and an oversupply of limbs. His name is Tongari-kun, or Mr. Pointy, and he is the brainchild of Takashi Murakami, the hyper-hip Japanese artist who has become an international celebrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Sputnik Sweetheart" (Knopf, 211 pages, $23) is Haruki Murakami's seventh novel translated into English. At home and abroad, many regard him, at 52, as Japan's finest living novelist. Widely traveled and comfortable in the United States and Europe, he is a writer of extraordinary breadth of interest and imagery, blessed with immense energy and capacity for innovation. Among works of his well received in America have been "Norwegian Wood" and "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle." Even enthusiasts, I believe, will find "Sputnik" stands alone without obvious parallel to his other books.
NEWS
September 21, 1998
Four Japanese peace ambassadors from the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima are visiting the Brethren Service fTC Center in New Windsor this week.Every two years, the center sends its ambassadors to several cities in the United States, where they meet with church and community organizations to promote peace. The members of the World Friendship Center, founded in 1965, believe that peace is built one person at a time.The ambassadors will be the guests of Carl and Carrie Beckwith, resident volunteers at the Brethren center.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 2006
Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman: 25 Stories Haruki Murakami Alfred A. Knopf / 352 pages / $25.00 In this extraordinary new story collection by the Japanese writer Haruki Murakami (The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Kafka on the Shore), reality is ever in danger of breaking loose of its moorings. People are sucked up into a void or drown in an unforgiving wave. Characters descend into wells. People are pursued by dark shadows. Man-eating cats, or morally indifferent cats, stalk the landscape. No matter the mayhem, there are never "reasons, causes."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
A group of Japanese transportation experts on an international field trip yesterday toured Owings Mills and marveled at nature where Americans see high growth."
FEATURES
By Mike Hale and Mike Hale,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 3, 1994
The nameless, faceless narrator of "Dance, Dance, Dance" -- the third of Haruki Murakami's best-selling novels to be released in English -- lives in a Japan that suffers a severe culture deficit with the United States. He takes his breakfasts at Dunkin' Donuts, his dinners at American-style steak houses, and sees Spielberg movies in between. The background noise of his life is a mix of jazz, Michael Jackson and the Talking Heads.The book he inhabits will feel familiar to U.S. readers for its style, too. Mr. Murakami has sold millions of copies of his (relatively)
NEWS
By Liz Kay and Liz Kay,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
About 100 people gathered yesterday afternoon at Preston and Spring streets to remember the Dawson family, within sight of their burned-out home. Many of those who attended the rally, broadcast on X105.7 FM, were from outside the East Baltimore neighborhood where an arson fire took the lives of Angela Maria Dawson and her five children Wednesday. Karmen Smith, 38, of Hamilton came with her children in tow. She described Dawson as a role model and called the event a "teachable moment." "I wanted to bring them, to show them the kind of things the drug trade has done to our communities," she said, wearing a "Baltimore Believe" T-shirt.
NEWS
By Liz Kay and Liz Kay,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
About 100 people gathered yesterday afternoon at Preston and Spring streets to remember the Dawson family, within sight of their burned-out home. Many of those who attended the rally, broadcast on X105.7 FM, were from outside the East Baltimore neighborhood where an arson fire took the lives of Angela Maria Dawson and her five children Wednesday. Karmen Smith, 38, of Hamilton came with her children in tow. She described Dawson as a role model and called the event a "teachable moment." "I wanted to bring them, to show them the kind of things the drug trade has done to our communities," she said, wearing a "Baltimore Believe" T-shirt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | July 15, 2001
He was a 29-year-old bar owner watching a baseball game when inspiration struck. It was a sunny day in April, and from out of nowhere an inner voice spoke to Haruki Murakami right there in the bleachers, as if he'd slipped into some Tokyo remake of "Field of Dreams." "You can write," the voice said, and Murakami heeded the call. Today, at 52, he is a best seller in his home country, and probably the world's most popular Japanese novelist abroad, with a loyal and growing following in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
"Sputnik Sweetheart" (Knopf, 211 pages, $23) is Haruki Murakami's seventh novel translated into English. At home and abroad, many regard him, at 52, as Japan's finest living novelist. Widely traveled and comfortable in the United States and Europe, he is a writer of extraordinary breadth of interest and imagery, blessed with immense energy and capacity for innovation. Among works of his well received in America have been "Norwegian Wood" and "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle." Even enthusiasts, I believe, will find "Sputnik" stands alone without obvious parallel to his other books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2000
September's treat is two novels from Japan, representing two generations. "Norwegian Wood" (Vintage International, 296 pages, $13) by Haruki Murakami, author of "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" and "South of the Border, West of the Sun," was published in 1987 in Japan, selling 4 million copies. Set in the late '60s, it follows Toru Watanabe, a Murakami everyman, in his first two years of college. The student movement rattles behind his door, but Toru doesn't listen. He's no more impressed by those who raise the flag of the rising sun outside his dorm windows every day at 6 a.m., to the tune of the national anthem on a Sony tape player.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | January 31, 1999
"South of the Border, West of the Sun," by Haruki Murakami, translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel. Knopf. 205 pages. $22.Hajime, a Japanese everyman, recounts his romantic life. "South of the Border, West of the Sun" seems light years from the historical inevitabilities of "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle," Haruki Murakami's most recent novel, not to mention the intrigues of the unconscious of his masterpiece "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World."Yet this new mesmerizing example of Murakami's deeply original fiction is equally allegorical.
NEWS
September 21, 1998
Four Japanese peace ambassadors from the World Friendship Center in Hiroshima are visiting the Brethren Service fTC Center in New Windsor this week.Every two years, the center sends its ambassadors to several cities in the United States, where they meet with church and community organizations to promote peace. The members of the World Friendship Center, founded in 1965, believe that peace is built one person at a time.The ambassadors will be the guests of Carl and Carrie Beckwith, resident volunteers at the Brethren center.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2000
September's treat is two novels from Japan, representing two generations. "Norwegian Wood" (Vintage International, 296 pages, $13) by Haruki Murakami, author of "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" and "South of the Border, West of the Sun," was published in 1987 in Japan, selling 4 million copies. Set in the late '60s, it follows Toru Watanabe, a Murakami everyman, in his first two years of college. The student movement rattles behind his door, but Toru doesn't listen. He's no more impressed by those who raise the flag of the rising sun outside his dorm windows every day at 6 a.m., to the tune of the national anthem on a Sony tape player.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
It's no big deal.That's this fall's catchphrase at Stanford University, relayed endlessly to reporters vying for the lowdown on Chelsea Clinton. School officials and students alike would have us believe her attendance is nothing out of the ordinary. Chelsea will have a normal campus life, Secret Service agents, lurking media vultures and D.C. dad notwithstanding.Apparently at Stanford, such things are incidental. They already have their share of contemporary campus stars such as millionaire dropout-golfer Ti- ger Woods and "The Wonder Years" actor Fred Savage.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 1997
"The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle," by Haruki Murakami. Knopf. 613 pages. $26.95.Having lived for a decade in the United States and written novels like "Hard-Boiled Wonderland at the End of the World," in which the characters read only European literature, listen to Western music from Jazz to the Beatles, and feast on spaghetti and potato salad, Haruki Murakami was compared misleadingly to Brett Easton Ellis and Jay McInerney. "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" is Murakami's first novel since his return to Japan, and it is a mesmerizing, original work.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
It's no big deal.That's this fall's catchphrase at Stanford University, relayed endlessly to reporters vying for the lowdown on Chelsea Clinton. School officials and students alike would have us believe her attendance is nothing out of the ordinary. Chelsea will have a normal campus life, Secret Service agents, lurking media vultures and D.C. dad notwithstanding.Apparently at Stanford, such things are incidental. They already have their share of contemporary campus stars such as millionaire dropout-golfer Ti- ger Woods and "The Wonder Years" actor Fred Savage.
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