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By Stephen Wigler | March 29, 1991
Hajime Teri Murai has been appointed as the Peabody Conservatory of Music's chief conductor. The conservatory announced yesterday that Murai will be the first occupant of the Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Music Director Chair, which was established last summer as part of a $3 million gift from the Blaustein-Rosenberg-Thalheimer family group.The 37-year-old Murai -- who was born in San Francisco, is currently the chief conductor of the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music and has won numerous awards for adventurous programming -- is the first resident conductor of the Peabody Conservatory since the departure of Peter Eros five years ago.Because of the conservatory's financial problems and uncertainty about its future in recent years, it became impossible to fill so major a position until Peabody's problems were resolved last summer.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | February 22, 2007
If there's a problem child among Gustav Mahler's nine symphonies, it's No. 7. A little unwieldy and unruly, prone to go off in unexpected directions, the Seventh has never been quite as easy to love as the others. But the work responds well to discipline, respect and affection, qualities it received Tuesday night by conductor Hajime Teri Murai and the Peabody Symphony Orchestra. Mahler, a little obsessive about death, slipped something funereal into all of his symphonies, usually to profound effect.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1997
Gustav Mahler's prophetic "my time will come" was given a resounding ring of truth yesterday afternoon at the Meyerhoff with a white-hot performance of his massive "Resurrection" Symphony. The 80-minute behemoth was almost perfectly realized by conductor Hajime Teri Murai and the 260 performers assembled to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Peabody Orchestra.The "Resurrection" Symphony gave Mahler his first public triumph as a composer. This symphony took six years to create, from the composition of the opening movement, a tone poem titled "Totenfeier," to its five-movement final version with its massive choral finale.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 7, 2006
My heart is calm and awaits its hour. Everywhere the dear earth once again blossoms into spring. Everywhere and forever the blue light of distant space. Forever ... forever ... With those lines, Gustav Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) comes not so much to an end as to an edge, the point where one reality stops and another begins. A symphony in all but name, Das Lied, scored for two solo singers and large orchestra and inspired by ancient Chinese poetry, was the first of the composer's farewells to life.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | February 22, 2007
If there's a problem child among Gustav Mahler's nine symphonies, it's No. 7. A little unwieldy and unruly, prone to go off in unexpected directions, the Seventh has never been quite as easy to love as the others. But the work responds well to discipline, respect and affection, qualities it received Tuesday night by conductor Hajime Teri Murai and the Peabody Symphony Orchestra. Mahler, a little obsessive about death, slipped something funereal into all of his symphonies, usually to profound effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 4, 2003
Hajime Teri Murai hurls instructions and complaints from the podium at a tempo only slightly slower than the one he sets with his baton, as the Peabody Symphony Orchestra charges into the Infernal Dance passage in Stravinksy's ballet score The Firebird. A glance to the cellos on his right: "Somebody's in the wrong octave." Now to the violins on his left: "Are you guys watching?" Back over to the violas: "Who's going to hear you? Maybe someone inside your instrument." And then the brass in the back: "Trombones, you drag the whole dance."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 2004
Out of at least a dozen worthwhile musical events over the weekend, I settled on two and felt well-rewarded. On Sunday evening, Arnaldo Cohen, filling in for an ailing Ivan Moravec, delivered a piano recital of uncommon intellectual depth and expressive power for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The night before, Hajime Teri Murai effectively guided the Peabody Symphony Orchestra and a supplement of vocal forces through Mahler's daunting Symphony No. 3 at Friedberg Hall. Anyone who dares to start a recital with music by Arnold Schoenberg gets my vote.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
THE PEABODY CONSERVATORY today announced the appointment of Hajime Teri Murai, a highly regarded 37-year-old conductor and teacher, as music director of the Peabody Symphony Orchestra.Murai, known as Teri, comes from the College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati. He created some excitement in December when he conducted the Peabody orchestra's 90 musicians in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5 and other works.The orchestra has been without a fulltime resident director since Peter Eros left several years ago, but it was praised for its concerts in the Soviet Union in 1987.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
In recent years, the conductor's baton of the Peabody Symphony Orchestra looked more like a runner's baton going from one temporary conductor to another. It showed.Saturday night, Peabody's new permanent leader from the University of Cincinnati Conservatory, Hajime Teri Murai, gave Baltimore a new rejuvenated orchestra in his debut here. Its promise of fine things with stability needed only the two hours of the delightful concert to show the future is here already with a major upgrading.Small, wiry and super-active on the podium, Murai delighted in extracting a variety of moods from the 80 players, opening with the frothy "Oberon Overture" of Weber and closing with a dynamic, multi-shaded Symphony No. 2 by Sibelius.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | March 29, 1991
WHEN HAJIME Teri Murai came to the Peabody in December to guest conduct the Peabody Symphony Orchestra, he packed in nine rehearsals in just over a week, and his results in the Hadyn and Shostakovich concert showed. Peabody director Robert Pierce called his appearance "electrifying," and others agreed.Three months later, Murai's diligence and impressive record at the College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati, paid off in a bigger way. The 37-year-old San Francisco native and third generation Japanese-American yesterday was named the new music director of the Peabody orchestra and director of Peabody orchestral activities.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 10, 2004
Out of at least a dozen worthwhile musical events over the weekend, I settled on two and felt well-rewarded. On Sunday evening, Arnaldo Cohen, filling in for an ailing Ivan Moravec, delivered a piano recital of uncommon intellectual depth and expressive power for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The night before, Hajime Teri Murai effectively guided the Peabody Symphony Orchestra and a supplement of vocal forces through Mahler's daunting Symphony No. 3 at Friedberg Hall. Anyone who dares to start a recital with music by Arnold Schoenberg gets my vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 20, 2003
If you think you know Puccini because you've been to Boheme, Butterfly or Tosca a few times, or even many times, there's still a lot more to learn about the man and his music. His less-performed operas are filled with fascinating characters and stories, propelled by brilliantly crafted scores. This is particularly true of the unusual collection of one-act pieces that Puccini put together as a full evening's dose of music and theater - Il Trittico (The Triptych). The individual components of this triple bill do get staged periodically, but the chance to experience the complete package has been far from common since the premiere at New York's Metropolitan Opera House in 1918.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 28, 2003
Music filled with enormous struggle and angst provided the sobering focal point of the Peabody Symphony Orchestra's long, but never tiring, concert Saturday in Friedberg Hall. Tears of Eros, a study in ominous sound and motion composed this year by Peabody alum Jason Anthony Allen, opened the program. Thickly orchestrated chords churn their way slowly through underlined emotions before reaching a fade-out tinged with sad resignation. The music is surely written, if not always distinctively; it loses its tensile quality after a while, with atmosphere superseding thematic or expressive activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 4, 2003
Hajime Teri Murai hurls instructions and complaints from the podium at a tempo only slightly slower than the one he sets with his baton, as the Peabody Symphony Orchestra charges into the Infernal Dance passage in Stravinksy's ballet score The Firebird. A glance to the cellos on his right: "Somebody's in the wrong octave." Now to the violins on his left: "Are you guys watching?" Back over to the violas: "Who's going to hear you? Maybe someone inside your instrument." And then the brass in the back: "Trombones, you drag the whole dance."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 19, 2002
For generations of music lovers, the "Three B's" will always be Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. Over the weekend, the Peabody Symphony Orchestra reminded listeners how awfully exclusive that list is by making a firm case for a 20th century "Three B's" - Bartok, Berg and Bernstein. Meyerhoff Symphony Hall houses relatively little post-1900 music these days, so Saturday's concert seemed almost shocking, even though the most recent work on the program was nearly 40 years old. The presentation of all that "modern" stuff apparently was too much for a few folks, who beat a premature retreat for the exit.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 27, 2001
NEW YORK -The Peabody Symphony Orchestra strutted its stuff on upper Broadway Wednesday evening. The conservatory students seemed highly energized for their concert at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall, perhaps reveling in the opportunity to perform practically in the shadow of the famed Juilliard School of Music. Although turnout for this self-presented concert was disappointingly small, the audience certainly got an earful of what Peabody is made of these days. The ensemble, led with considerable intensity by music director Hajime Teri Murai, rose above even the impressive level heard in Baltimore lately.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 6, 1996
Perhaps the second most wonderful thing about being young is being slow to recognize danger or difficultly. That's surely one reason why the battle of the skies in World War II was won putting American teen-agers in fighter planes. It must also have been a factor in the convincing performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 6 that the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gave Saturday evening in Friedberg Concert Hall.Under the baton of their music director, Hajime Teri Murai, the young musicians performed this fiercely difficult work, the most tragic in the Mahler canon, with energy, stamina and accuracy that would have made a professional orchestra proud.
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By New York Times News Service | April 24, 1995
TOKYO -- A top official of the religious sect suspected in last month's subway nerve gas attack was fatally stabbed in the stomach last night as he walked through a phalanx of television cameras outside the sect's offices.The victim, Hideo Murai, chief of the sect's "Science and Technology Agency," collapsed and was taken to a hospital. The doctors who operated on Mr. Murai, 36, had told reporters that he lost large amounts of blood and suffered damage to his liver and kidneys. He died early today, several hours after surgery, officials said.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1997
Gustav Mahler's prophetic "my time will come" was given a resounding ring of truth yesterday afternoon at the Meyerhoff with a white-hot performance of his massive "Resurrection" Symphony. The 80-minute behemoth was almost perfectly realized by conductor Hajime Teri Murai and the 260 performers assembled to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Peabody Orchestra.The "Resurrection" Symphony gave Mahler his first public triumph as a composer. This symphony took six years to create, from the composition of the opening movement, a tone poem titled "Totenfeier," to its five-movement final version with its massive choral finale.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1997
Mozart's "Don Giovanni" has a cast-iron reputation as the "opera of all operas." And while librettist Lorenzo da Ponte's version of the Don Juan legend may be overrated, it certainly inspired the composer to write some of his greatest music.Mozart's music is always a challenge, but on Thursday night in Friedberg Hall, a new production by the Peabody Opera Theater rose admirably to the occasion with a fresh and radiant account of this mighty score.Thursday's cast -- which varied from that on Friday and Sunday -- was generally strong, both vocally and dramatically.
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