Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMuqtada Al Sadr
IN THE NEWS

Muqtada Al Sadr

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Hard-line Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr threatened "open war" as Iraqi and U.S. forces battled his Mahdi Army militia in two key strongholds yesterday, raising the specter that a truce credited with reducing violence could end soon. The warning was the closest the cleric has come to canceling the truce he called in August, and it coincided with an Iranian denunciation of U.S. airstrikes in support of the Shiite-led government's military offensive. The United States accuses Iran of providing training, arms and other aid to Shiite extremists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Raheem Salman and Tina Susman and Raheem Salman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | November 28, 2008
BAGHDAD - Iraq's parliament approved a three-year timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops yesterday, a pact that supporters call a path to sovereignty and opponents say could be used to keep Americans on Iraqi soil indefinitely. The pact is the first step taken by Iraqi legislators toward ending the U.S. presence in their country since the American-led invasion in March 2003. It is expected to be ratified by Iraq's three-member presidency council. The vote, held above the din of detractors shouting, "No!"
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr ordered his Mahdi Army militia yesterday to extend its cease-fire for six months, boosting hopes that a recent trend toward sharply lower Iraqi civilian and American military deaths in Baghdad would continue. His announcement, read by Sadrist clerics at mosques throughout southern and central Iraq, came precisely two years after the bombing of a revered Shiite shrine in Samarra that unleashed a wave of sectarian violence across Iraq. After the bombing, al-Sadr's huge militia rampaged through Sunni neighborhoods of Baghdad, killing hundreds of Sunnis every week and seizing control of three-quarters of the city.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Hard-line Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr threatened "open war" as Iraqi and U.S. forces battled his Mahdi Army militia in two key strongholds yesterday, raising the specter that a truce credited with reducing violence could end soon. The warning was the closest the cleric has come to canceling the truce he called in August, and it coincided with an Iranian denunciation of U.S. airstrikes in support of the Shiite-led government's military offensive. The United States accuses Iran of providing training, arms and other aid to Shiite extremists.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2008
BAGHDAD -- A senior aide to the radical anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr was shot to death yesterday as he returned home from Friday prayers in Najaf. Police declared a curfew in the Shiite holy city and put reinforcements on the streets, fearing a backlash by al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia provoked by the killing of Sayyed Riyadh al-Nouri. Security officials in Najaf said he was in al-Adala neighborhood, a half-mile east of Najaf, when the gunmen pulled over and opened fire, killing him instantly.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr refused yesterday to meet with a delegation of Iraqi politicians dispatched to Najaf to try to end the bloody confrontation between his militia and U.S. forces. Al-Sadr's aides said it was too dangerous for al-Sadr to leave his secret hideout and meet the delegation, which flew to Najaf aboard two U.S. military helicopters, dodged gunfire and mortars to reach the Imam Ali mosque, then spent three hours waiting for al-Sadr to appear. The arrival of the eight-member delegation coincided with a sharp escalation of violence around the shrine, and al-Sadr spokesman Qais al-Khazali blamed U.S. forces for scuttling the meeting "because they didn't stop fighting."
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Borzou Daragahi and Louise Roug and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki promised yesterday to crack down on Shiite Muslim militias and Sunni Arab rebels, warning that no one - not even his political ally, Muqtada al-Sadr - will be above the law. "We will not allow any politicians to interfere with this Baghdad security plan whether they are Sunnis or Shiites, Arabs or Kurds, militias or parties, insurgents or terrorists," al-Maliki said, in a rare and forceful interview....
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Caesar Ahmed and Ashraf Khalil and Caesar Ahmed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Members of Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi militia began turning over weapons to Iraqi authorities here yesterday as the first step in a fledgling peace agreement designed to end weeks of deadly clashes in the capital. Loyalists of the Shiite Muslim cleric gathered at three police stations in the capital's Sadr City neighborhood to turn over weaponry. The program, scheduled to run through Friday, offers payments ranging from $11 for a mortar round to $1,000 for a heavy machine gun. Authorities did not immediately release complete figures on the day's intake.
NEWS
By Doug Smith and Zeena Kareem and Doug Smith and Zeena Kareem,Los Angeles Times | October 9, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- American and Iraqi forces fended off an assault early yesterday in the southern city of Diwaniyah, where the Iraqi army fought a major battle with Shiite Muslim militias in August, the U.S. military said. An Army statement said that 30 militants were killed, and a spokeswoman for the U.S.-led coalition said last night that helicopter crews supporting the ground units had counted the dead. But Iraqi witnesses to the early morning firefight said three to seven people were injured and no one was killed.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Angry followers of Muqtada al-Sadr - the militant Shiite Muslim cleric whom U.S. officials have vowed to capture or kill - gathered in the southern city of Basra yesterday and blamed occupying British forces for a series of gruesome bombings Wednesday that killed dozens of residents, including 20 children on their way to school. Authorities say the explosions outside four Iraqi police installations were the result of five suicide car bombs. The coordinated blasts were being investigated to determine who was responsible, officials said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2008
BAGHDAD -- A senior aide to the radical anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr was shot to death yesterday as he returned home from Friday prayers in Najaf. Police declared a curfew in the Shiite holy city and put reinforcements on the streets, fearing a backlash by al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia provoked by the killing of Sayyed Riyadh al-Nouri. Security officials in Najaf said he was in al-Adala neighborhood, a half-mile east of Najaf, when the gunmen pulled over and opened fire, killing him instantly.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr ordered his Mahdi Army militia yesterday to extend its cease-fire for six months, boosting hopes that a recent trend toward sharply lower Iraqi civilian and American military deaths in Baghdad would continue. His announcement, read by Sadrist clerics at mosques throughout southern and central Iraq, came precisely two years after the bombing of a revered Shiite shrine in Samarra that unleashed a wave of sectarian violence across Iraq. After the bombing, al-Sadr's huge militia rampaged through Sunni neighborhoods of Baghdad, killing hundreds of Sunnis every week and seizing control of three-quarters of the city.
NEWS
By Louise Roug and Borzou Daragahi and Louise Roug and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 18, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki promised yesterday to crack down on Shiite Muslim militias and Sunni Arab rebels, warning that no one - not even his political ally, Muqtada al-Sadr - will be above the law. "We will not allow any politicians to interfere with this Baghdad security plan whether they are Sunnis or Shiites, Arabs or Kurds, militias or parties, insurgents or terrorists," al-Maliki said, in a rare and forceful interview....
NEWS
By Doug Smith and Zeena Kareem and Doug Smith and Zeena Kareem,Los Angeles Times | October 9, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- American and Iraqi forces fended off an assault early yesterday in the southern city of Diwaniyah, where the Iraqi army fought a major battle with Shiite Muslim militias in August, the U.S. military said. An Army statement said that 30 militants were killed, and a spokeswoman for the U.S.-led coalition said last night that helicopter crews supporting the ground units had counted the dead. But Iraqi witnesses to the early morning firefight said three to seven people were injured and no one was killed.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | September 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a sobering new assessment of Iraq, senior Pentagon officials sketched out a bloody landscape yesterday of sectarian violence spreading beyond Baghdad and execution-style assassinations and terrorist bombings by increasingly entrenched private militias and death squads. "This is probably the most complex combat environment we have seen since the war began," said Rear Adm. William Sullivan, the top strategic planner for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The severity and breadth of the Defense Department report, which is required four times a year by Congress, appeared to undercut recent statements by President Bush and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld that conditions in Iraq are difficult but that steady progress is being made and that, as Rumsfeld put it Tuesday, "The question isn't whether we can win. It's whether we have the will to persevere to win."
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Caesar Ahmed and Ashraf Khalil and Caesar Ahmed,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Members of Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi militia began turning over weapons to Iraqi authorities here yesterday as the first step in a fledgling peace agreement designed to end weeks of deadly clashes in the capital. Loyalists of the Shiite Muslim cleric gathered at three police stations in the capital's Sadr City neighborhood to turn over weaponry. The program, scheduled to run through Friday, offers payments ranging from $11 for a mortar round to $1,000 for a heavy machine gun. Authorities did not immediately release complete figures on the day's intake.
NEWS
By Raheem Salman and Tina Susman and Raheem Salman and Tina Susman,Los Angeles Times | November 28, 2008
BAGHDAD - Iraq's parliament approved a three-year timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops yesterday, a pact that supporters call a path to sovereignty and opponents say could be used to keep Americans on Iraqi soil indefinitely. The pact is the first step taken by Iraqi legislators toward ending the U.S. presence in their country since the American-led invasion in March 2003. It is expected to be ratified by Iraq's three-member presidency council. The vote, held above the din of detractors shouting, "No!"
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 27, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and the U.S.-backed Iraqi government reached a deal forged by Iraq's most powerful Shiite cleric late yesterday that would end the bloody standoff in Najaf by requiring that rebel forces disarm in exchange for a peaceful exit from the city. The deal brokered by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani - just hours after his momentous return to his embattled home city - offers fragile hope to resolve a crisis that has gripped Iraq since Aug. 5, reduced much of central Najaf to ruins and challenged the authority of the nation's fledgling government.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 27, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and the U.S.-backed Iraqi government reached a deal forged by Iraq's most powerful Shiite cleric late yesterday that would end the bloody standoff in Najaf by requiring that rebel forces disarm in exchange for a peaceful exit from the city. The deal brokered by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Husseini al-Sistani - just hours after his momentous return to his embattled home city - offers fragile hope to resolve a crisis that has gripped Iraq since Aug. 5, reduced much of central Najaf to ruins and challenged the authority of the nation's fledgling government.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Rebel cleric Muqtada al-Sadr refused yesterday to meet with a delegation of Iraqi politicians dispatched to Najaf to try to end the bloody confrontation between his militia and U.S. forces. Al-Sadr's aides said it was too dangerous for al-Sadr to leave his secret hideout and meet the delegation, which flew to Najaf aboard two U.S. military helicopters, dodged gunfire and mortars to reach the Imam Ali mosque, then spent three hours waiting for al-Sadr to appear. The arrival of the eight-member delegation coincided with a sharp escalation of violence around the shrine, and al-Sadr spokesman Qais al-Khazali blamed U.S. forces for scuttling the meeting "because they didn't stop fighting."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.