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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2002
Sharp-eyed passers-by along Calvert Street may have noticed that it's not the "unsey Building" undergoing renovation by Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, but the landmark Munsey Building. Designed by the famed New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White, the building has graced the southeastern quadrant of Monument Square since 1909. One hopes the missing "M," which may have been stolen or damaged and removed during construction work, will be replaced. An article in The Sun last week about the conversion of the 18-story neo-classical Munsey Building at Calvert and Fayette streets into apartments said the building was named for a "New York businessman."
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NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2006
A small-town girl goes to New York in the 1920s and finds adventure, friendship and finally love. That basically is the story of Thoroughly Modern Millie, both the 1967 movie and the stage adaptation now running at Toby's Dinner Theatre. On the night we attended, a spunky performance by Lauren Spencer-Harris was interrupted by illness during Act I. Her understudy, Ashley Adkins, took over almost seamlessly. It was her first performance in the role and she did a commendable job. Millie Dillmount has a plan -- go to work for a company run by a handsome single man and marry him. Her boss, Trevor Graydon, is a cheerful, outgoing go-getter -- just the type she is looking for. Ken Ewing brings vigor, charm and a fine baritone voice to the role.
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FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 28, 2001
THE OTHER evening, the downtown kinked in traffic knots, I found myself stalled on Guilford Avenue. I was ready to bail out and walk when I spotted a chunk of old Baltimore blessedly on a course to a new life. The venerable old Munsey Building, at the southeast corner of Calvert and Fayette streets, had its white brick east side ripped open. Workers were beginning the process of reconfiguring a 90-year-old skyscraper into apartments, thereby assuring that an esteemed Baltimore landmark will not wind up a parking lot the way its neighbor, the Tower Building, did. In the era of President William Howard Taft, the Munsey housed the old Baltimore News, the leading afternoon paper here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
The old Munsey building on Calvert Street, once the home of the Equitable Trust Company, recently celebrated the grand opening of its new life as an 18-story high-end apartment building. On the ground floor are three restaurants: Suzie's Soba to the right, and Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee, which share a space, to the left. Suzie's Soba, which has another restaurant by the same name in Hampden, is the class act of the bunch, serving lively Korean fare in a stylish setting. Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee are far more prosaic, providing sandwiches, baked goods and hot beverages to the downtown breakfast and lunch crowd.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
The developer wheels up in his Rollerblades, collar open and leather bag slung over his shoulder. Kicking off his footwear, he pads up into a darkened staircase in the vacant 18-story office building in downtown Baltimore, stumbling and hopping when his stocking feet meet a chunk of debris. There is a method to Ted Rouse's madness. The part-owner of Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse is trying to show that the nearly century-old Munsey building at 5 N. Calvert St. would be a fun and funky place for high-tech workers to live.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2002
You would wake up surrounded by bustling bank buildings, courthouses, office towers and City Hall. And go to bed in an area that, at day's end, turns into an eerie ghost town of shuttered doors. But if you worked downtown, you'd have no commute - and a home address that's being promoted as "urban funky." Late next month, the first tenants could move into the 18-story Munsey Building at Calvert and Fayette streets, launching a new experiment in Baltimore urban living. It doesn't get any more downtown than this.
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2003
In the current Arena Stage production of Lerner and Lowe's Camelot in Washington, a certain knight in shining armor hails not from the bright lights of Broadway, but from Howard County. Lawrence Brimmer (his professional Actors Equity name) has been better known to local audiences at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia, until recently, as Larry Munsey. This charming, soft-spoken man of multiple talents has an impressive list of credits. As a leading actor, he has played title roles in The Jazz Singer and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat at Toby's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
The old Munsey building on Calvert Street, once the home of the Equitable Trust Company, recently celebrated the grand opening of its new life as an 18-story high-end apartment building. On the ground floor are three restaurants: Suzie's Soba to the right, and Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee, which share a space, to the left. Suzie's Soba, which has another restaurant by the same name in Hampden, is the class act of the bunch, serving lively Korean fare in a stylish setting. Roly Poly and Coffee Coffee are far more prosaic, providing sandwiches, baked goods and hot beverages to the downtown breakfast and lunch crowd.
SPORTS
March 11, 1997
Unbeaten four-time state champ Steve Kessler of Owings Mills will lead the 1A-2A squad against a 3A-4A squad and a private school team in tonight's Senior All-Star Wrestling Classic at Johns Hopkins at 7.Also competing for the 1A-2A squad, coached by Owings Mills' Guy Pritzker, is Wheaton's three-time state champ Scott Munsey (140) and two-time state champs Greg Forbes (heavyweight, Milford Mill), Jeremy Lignelli (160, Glenelg) and Sparrows Point's Tommy Free (125) and Mike Young (130). Mount St. Joseph coach Paul Triplett heads the private schools team, with National Prep champs Sal Aquia (160, Curley)
NEWS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | January 22, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget proposal includes $20 million for the state's Department of General Services to continue buying office space, an initiative designed to consolidate state offices and save money on long-term rent."
NEWS
By R.N. Marshall and R.N. Marshall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2003
In the current Arena Stage production of Lerner and Lowe's Camelot in Washington, a certain knight in shining armor hails not from the bright lights of Broadway, but from Howard County. Lawrence Brimmer (his professional Actors Equity name) has been better known to local audiences at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia, until recently, as Larry Munsey. This charming, soft-spoken man of multiple talents has an impressive list of credits. As a leading actor, he has played title roles in The Jazz Singer and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat at Toby's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2003
For area restaurant listings and more reviews or to search for recipes, go to www.SunSpot.net/eatsFunky, charming, delicious Suzie's Soba, a Hampden culinary destination for the past five years, has opened a second location in the historic Munsey Building on Calvert Street. The building, now being converted to high-end apartments, housed the Equitable Trust Co. for more than 80 years. Suzie's kitchen is where the tellers used to be, and the spacious dining area still purrs with the tony ambience of a high-end bank, now Suzie-fied with funky touches like origami fish that seem to float among the bubble-themed artwork, and light fixtures decorated with glass beads and silk flowers.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2002
Sharp-eyed passers-by along Calvert Street may have noticed that it's not the "unsey Building" undergoing renovation by Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, but the landmark Munsey Building. Designed by the famed New York architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White, the building has graced the southeastern quadrant of Monument Square since 1909. One hopes the missing "M," which may have been stolen or damaged and removed during construction work, will be replaced. An article in The Sun last week about the conversion of the 18-story neo-classical Munsey Building at Calvert and Fayette streets into apartments said the building was named for a "New York businessman."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2002
You would wake up surrounded by bustling bank buildings, courthouses, office towers and City Hall. And go to bed in an area that, at day's end, turns into an eerie ghost town of shuttered doors. But if you worked downtown, you'd have no commute - and a home address that's being promoted as "urban funky." Late next month, the first tenants could move into the 18-story Munsey Building at Calvert and Fayette streets, launching a new experiment in Baltimore urban living. It doesn't get any more downtown than this.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 28, 2001
THE OTHER evening, the downtown kinked in traffic knots, I found myself stalled on Guilford Avenue. I was ready to bail out and walk when I spotted a chunk of old Baltimore blessedly on a course to a new life. The venerable old Munsey Building, at the southeast corner of Calvert and Fayette streets, had its white brick east side ripped open. Workers were beginning the process of reconfiguring a 90-year-old skyscraper into apartments, thereby assuring that an esteemed Baltimore landmark will not wind up a parking lot the way its neighbor, the Tower Building, did. In the era of President William Howard Taft, the Munsey housed the old Baltimore News, the leading afternoon paper here.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2000
The developer wheels up in his Rollerblades, collar open and leather bag slung over his shoulder. Kicking off his footwear, he pads up into a darkened staircase in the vacant 18-story office building in downtown Baltimore, stumbling and hopping when his stocking feet meet a chunk of debris. There is a method to Ted Rouse's madness. The part-owner of Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse is trying to show that the nearly century-old Munsey building at 5 N. Calvert St. would be a fun and funky place for high-tech workers to live.
BUSINESS
By TIMOTHY J. MULLANEY and TIMOTHY J. MULLANEY,Staff Writer | September 29, 1993
Munsey Building going back to lenderOne of downtown's most problem-plagued Class B office buildings is slated to be returned to its lender this week, but the local partner in the Munsey Building at 7 N. Calvert St. says those problems are endemic among older structures."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
INDIAN HEAD -- Last night's Class 1A-2A South Region duals title match at Lackey, ranked No. 4 in the state, was the Charles County school's fourth meeting with Hammond, ranked No. 5 in the state.But the visiting Bears (15-1), ranked No. 3 in The Sun, hadn't seen Lackey like this: From 140 down, every wrestler dropped a weight class.Lackey (15-1) kept the bouts close in those low weight classes, then took advantage up top in a 39-17 victory that prevented the Columbia school (15-2) from defending its duals title and sent the Chargers to Saturday's dual-meet championships at North Carroll.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
A Rockville developer plans to purchase the vacant Munsey Building downtown and convert the 18-story building into 126 apartments and lofts beginning early next year. Developer Richard Brinker Sr.'s plan also includes as many as 120 parking spaces in the basement and retail and commercial uses on the first three floors of the 85-year-old building at 7 N. Calvert St. The $20 million conversion would take about a year, Brinker said. "Market studies that we've conducted show that [residential]
SPORTS
March 11, 1997
Unbeaten four-time state champ Steve Kessler of Owings Mills will lead the 1A-2A squad against a 3A-4A squad and a private school team in tonight's Senior All-Star Wrestling Classic at Johns Hopkins at 7.Also competing for the 1A-2A squad, coached by Owings Mills' Guy Pritzker, is Wheaton's three-time state champ Scott Munsey (140) and two-time state champs Greg Forbes (heavyweight, Milford Mill), Jeremy Lignelli (160, Glenelg) and Sparrows Point's Tommy Free (125) and Mike Young (130). Mount St. Joseph coach Paul Triplett heads the private schools team, with National Prep champs Sal Aquia (160, Curley)
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