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By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
As area towns tackle water issues, municipal officials find themselves increasingly frustrated with rigid state regulations, unanticipated changes in standards for well-yield and treatment-plant capacity and unfamiliar emergency procedures. Town managers also have experienced difficulties trying to reach the appropriate state expert on any given water problem, they said. "Water and wastewater are growing concerns for the Maryland Department of Planning and the Department of the Environment," said Bob Summers, director of the Water Management Administration at MDE. "Every county and town struggle with these issues.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown 's campaign for governor rolled out about 70 endorsements from municipal elected officials around the state Tuesday -- among them seven members of the Baltimore City Council. Brown's event in Ocean City follows by a day an announcement by his chief rival, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, of a series of proposals to combat domestic violence. The lieutenant governor's show of strength came as city and town leaders from around the state gathered at the resort for the summer convention of the Maryland Municipal League.
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
The lobbying arm of the state's cities and towns will reach a lot farther after Wednesday.During the final day of its three-day convention in Ocean City this week, the Maryland Municipal League will unveil its Annapolis Connection, a program to put all local officials incontact with their legislative delegations as the General Assembly fine-tunes growth and tax measures struck down this year."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Talk about your playground bullies. Municipal officials and Smart Growth advocates are crying foul over a move by the General Assembly to divert to pet projects $2 million from a $5 million program aimed at fixing up community parks and playgrounds, mainly in towns and cities. The legislature's budget committees earmarked the $2 million for eight large-scale recreation projects in the state's big suburban counties, some of them not even parks or playgrounds -such as a press box, artificial turf, stadium lights and seating for school ball fields.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- Seven candidates for governor told Maryland municipal officials exactly what they wanted to hear yesterday: that they would stop state government from slapping requirements on local governments without sending the money to pay for them.All of the candidates answering questions at a forum at the Maryland Municipal League summer conference here said they would prohibit such "mandates" without accompanying funds.HTC Two -- Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- went even further, saying they would support an amendment to the state Constitution prohibiting unfunded mandates.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Carroll legislators told municipal officials last night that they wouldn't support a tax increase even if the money was used to beef up local police protection."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | December 30, 1990
The county's first attempt at developing a long-range, comprehensive plan to both preserve Carroll's rural heritage and prepare for growth began to take more definite shape this year.In December, county government and municipal officials convened for the first Town/County Partnership Conference to form the union that is considered necessary to implement policies recommended by seven "strategic planning groups."The committees, appointed by the County Commissioners about two years ago to study problems associated with the county's rapid growth and recommend solutions, completed their work earlier this year.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Arthur Levitt Jr., chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is disappointed that state and city officials want to delay limits on political contributions by securities firms.Their effort to put off restrictions, Mr. Levitt said in a statement, "shows a misunderstanding of the problems and the proposed solutions" involving political contributions and municipal-bond firms."Efforts to thwart these actions are counter to our common goal of preserving the integrity and public confidence so vital to the market upon which our towns, cities and states depend," Mr. Levitt said.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | November 14, 1990
Carroll municipal officials have grumbled quietly for years that county government sometimes pays too little attention to their needs in developing policies.As an example, several mayors cite the landfill fees proposed by the county last year -- without consulting with town officials -- that initially left municipal budgets in limbo and eventually forced higher tax rates.But a Town/County Partnership Conference -- set for Dec. 1 to discuss plans for preserving agriculture and providing infrastructure and affordable housing in Carroll -- could be the dawn of a new era of improved communication, say municipal officials.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | September 18, 1991
Avant-garde director John Waters found downtown Sykesville so symbolic of quaint, small-town America that he chose it as a backdrop for his 1989 film, "Cry Baby," about rival teen-age cliques.But venture just beyond the town's borders and one could experience "culture shock" -- the term Sykesville Town Manager James Schumacher uses to describe the contrast between the downtown businesses, homes, parks and streets built about a century ago and the new subdivisions, such as Lexington Run, on the outskirts.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
As area towns tackle water issues, municipal officials find themselves increasingly frustrated with rigid state regulations, unanticipated changes in standards for well-yield and treatment-plant capacity and unfamiliar emergency procedures. Town managers also have experienced difficulties trying to reach the appropriate state expert on any given water problem, they said. "Water and wastewater are growing concerns for the Maryland Department of Planning and the Department of the Environment," said Bob Summers, director of the Water Management Administration at MDE. "Every county and town struggle with these issues.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2005
OCEAN CITY - Mayor Martin O'Malley threw a cocktail party, and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. hosted a dessert reception. But Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan was out to convince the crowd at the annual Maryland Municipal League convention here that he's the main course. The gathering, which wraps up today, was one of the first chances for the state's mayors, public works directors and other local government officials to see the three likely major contenders in the 2006 governor's race together.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
Three Maryland Municipal League officials tutored Columbia residents last night on the mechanics of turning their community into an incorporated city. From the basics of signature-gathering to the nitty-gritty of Article 23A of the Maryland Annotated Code, the officials listed the steps for bringing municipal government to Columbia, now governed by a homeowners association. But even the experts were stumped on one point. "How do you get past the apathy?" Bill Eckman, past president of the league and mayor of La Plata in Southern Maryland, posed the question to the 15 of Columbia's 87,000 residents who attended the meeting at the Other Barn in Oakland Mills.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Alone in a Westminster radio studio with a tape rolling and a stopwatch ticking, town officials are recording municipal minutes for Sunday morning listeners.For 10 minutes starting at 8:20 a.m. Sundays, their musings on issues and events air on the "Carroll Municipal Show." WTTR-AM rotates the program among the eight municipalities."Town residents can't always get to their local meetings," said Mark Woodworth, reporter and anchor at the county's only radio station."Now, they can turn on the radio Sunday and hear their mayor talking about what is of interest to their community."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Carroll legislators told municipal officials last night that they wouldn't support a tax increase even if the money was used to beef up local police protection."
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
OCEAN CITY -- Seven candidates for governor told Maryland municipal officials exactly what they wanted to hear yesterday: that they would stop state government from slapping requirements on local governments without sending the money to pay for them.All of the candidates answering questions at a forum at the Maryland Municipal League summer conference here said they would prohibit such "mandates" without accompanying funds.HTC Two -- Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey -- went even further, saying they would support an amendment to the state Constitution prohibiting unfunded mandates.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
The state doesn't have the money now to build a Hampstead bypass previously slated for construction in 1992, but the project has not been shelved, Maryland's transportation secretary assured anxious Carroll officials.In their annual pitch to state Department of Transportation representatives Thursday, county and municipal officials urged accelerated planning and construction of several bypasses to relieve congestion on major highways and bolster economic development.The Route 30 bypass around Hampstead, the project closest to fruition, tops the county's list, but not the state's.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Staff writer | July 24, 1991
The talk centered on sunshine in this Eastern Shore resort town Monday -- but it had nothing to do with getting a tan.Instead, municipal officials from across the state were steeped in discussion on recent revisions to the so-called sunshine laws, which dictate when government bodies in Maryland can meet behind closed doors."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Arthur Levitt Jr., chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, is disappointed that state and city officials want to delay limits on political contributions by securities firms.Their effort to put off restrictions, Mr. Levitt said in a statement, "shows a misunderstanding of the problems and the proposed solutions" involving political contributions and municipal-bond firms."Efforts to thwart these actions are counter to our common goal of preserving the integrity and public confidence so vital to the market upon which our towns, cities and states depend," Mr. Levitt said.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | December 12, 1993
KYOTO, Japan -- Preparing for its 1,200th anniversary, this ancient capital of Japan is trying to burnish its mystique as the repository of old customs and past splendor. But it has to contend with a national inclination to reconstruct everything in a modern way.And, for those who care about the old stuff, it may be too late."Nowhere else will you find such cultural stock," says Tomoyuki Tanabe, Kyoto's mayor.Indeed the Japanese, who tend to be precise about such matters, note that Kyoto, Japan's seventh-largest city and ancient capital, has 10 percent of the country's population but 15 percent of its officially certified "Important Cultural Properties" and 20 percent of the ultra-rare, also officially certified, "National Treasures."
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