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NEWS
February 4, 1997
An article Jan. 27 incorrectly described pay raises given to Indiana state employees represented by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. In fact, the raises for 1994 and 1995 were 3 percent and 4 percent respectively. The period during which state employees' pay was frozen was June 1991 through December 1993.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/04/97
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
With the city retirement system short hundreds of millions of dollars in unfunded liabilities, officials say they are likely to begin requiring municipal employees to contribute to their pensions. "Pretty much everyone is in agreement that it's fair," said Carl Stokes, chairman of the City Council's finance committee. "Those who are benefiting from the pensions should be contributing to them. " The finance committee is scheduled to hear testimony Thursday on a proposal by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to require thousands of civilian employees to begin making contributions.
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NEWS
By Staff Report | November 2, 1993
White-collar municipal employees could unionize and fight an order barring them from accruing compensatory time under an ordinance introduced in the Baltimore City Council last night.Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge, a 2nd District Democrat, introduced the bill on behalf of some 800 municipal employees who are currently barred from organizing.Many are upset with a new policy that limits the amount of severance pay bureaucrats receive when they leave city employment. The order, which goes into effect in January, is aimed at 415 employees who are paid more than $50,000 a year.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
  Baltimore City posted new pay data for city workers on its Open Baltimore website Wednesday, and the numbers once again illustrate how overtime can help lift incomes far above annual salary levels. The figures show that 328 municipal employees - 172 at the Police Department - received gross pay at least 50 percent above their salary. The data covers fiscal 2012, which ended June 30. Police Lt. Stephen C. Nalewajko Jr. made more money than MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, earning $166,200 compared to the mayor's gross pay of $161,800.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 7, 2002
SALISBURY - Service employees at Salisbury University voted yesterday to be represented by the Maryland Classified Employees Association in a runoff election between MCEA and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The 250-person Salisbury chapter is the largest group to vote for MCEA representation under a state law allowing collective bargaining at public campuses.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
An attempt to expand the power of municipal employees to challenge lengthy disciplinary suspensions is meeting stiff resistance from Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration, setting up a possible showdown in the City Council. City Union of Baltimore, which represents about 3,000 of some 15,000 municipal employees, is pushing a change to city law that would let those who are suspended for 30 days or more file a formal grievance and seek independent arbitration. "What's the opposition to having a neutral, unbiased party review a case?"
NEWS
July 20, 1995
In a front-page article in its June 28 editions, The Sun reported on a study in which the WEFA Group, an economics consultancy, said that Maryland stands to lose about 100,000 jobs over the next 10 years under federal budget-cutting plans now moving through Congress. The Sun has since learned that the study was conducted under contract with a public employees union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The union's sponsorship of the study should have been made clear in the article.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Kevin L. McQuaid contributed to this article | December 16, 1994
A large Landover-based credit union that serves other credit unions has restricted withdrawals by its nearly 500 customers because of problems with its portfolio of derivatives.The Capital Corporate Federal Credit Union, which had nearly two-thirds of its $1.5 billion in assets in the risky securities, took the action last week after it was unable to sell the derivatives quickly enough to raise money to meet demand for loans.Capital, many of whose customers are Maryland-based credit unions, said it is negotiating a merger with a larger California credit union to ease the problems that led to last week's declaration of a 60-day withdrawal freeze.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
If city workers and union officials think busting up a party in which municipal employees were drinking and gambling on the job is overzealous, then Baltimore could use a lot more zeal. The fact that the city inspector general's 2011 raid on a Department of Transportation facility has resulted in only one criminal conviction should not be taken as an indication that this was much ado about nothing or that the workers involved were somehow unfairly persecuted. City residents pay a lot of taxes to fund those workers' salaries, and they deserve to know that this kind of behavior will not be tolerated.
NEWS
July 8, 2001
BALTIMORE CITY rewards non-work instead of work. Some $30.6 million a year could be saved if the city's generous employee health insurance program was adjusted to private-sector levels, absenteeism was reduced to the national standard and the lavish accident-leave policy was renegotiated. These are among key findings of an important $40,000 study that urges Mayor Martin O'Malley to completely overhaul the city's employment practices. The 141 pages of analysis and recommendations by the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents' Roundtable are political dynamite because they would require concessions and cooperation from 15,800 municipal employees and their unions.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
If city workers and union officials think busting up a party in which municipal employees were drinking and gambling on the job is overzealous, then Baltimore could use a lot more zeal. The fact that the city inspector general's 2011 raid on a Department of Transportation facility has resulted in only one criminal conviction should not be taken as an indication that this was much ado about nothing or that the workers involved were somehow unfairly persecuted. City residents pay a lot of taxes to fund those workers' salaries, and they deserve to know that this kind of behavior will not be tolerated.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
Three Baltimore County unions have agreed to give up cost-of-living increases in exchange for job security through 2014, yet another sign that local officials are bracing for continued tough economic times. The county is approaching the end of a two-year agreement that required municipal and public safety employees to pay a larger share of health care costs. Unions representing 1,925 sheriff's department workers, firefighters and some municipal employees — roughly a quarter of the county's workforce — would be affected by the contract extension, which was announced Tuesday by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz.
NEWS
May 20, 2007
Howard M. Wheeler, a retired Baltimore municipal employee and service station owner, died of renal failure Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 93. Born and raised in West Baltimore near the trolley line where his father worked as a conductor, Mr. Wheeler left school early and held a variety of jobs. During World War II, he worked at the Bethlehem Steel shipyards and helped build Liberty ships, which played a pivotal role in America's war effort.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
An attempt to expand the power of municipal employees to challenge lengthy disciplinary suspensions is meeting stiff resistance from Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration, setting up a possible showdown in the City Council. City Union of Baltimore, which represents about 3,000 of some 15,000 municipal employees, is pushing a change to city law that would let those who are suspended for 30 days or more file a formal grievance and seek independent arbitration. "What's the opposition to having a neutral, unbiased party review a case?"
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
BJ Dixon joined the town of Mount Airy in April 1979 as a planning and zoning clerk, but quickly began doing almost anything that needed doing, according to those who know her. Now, more than 26 years later, she's officially Mount Airy's town clerk and head of its permit department, coordinating the town planning commission and board of zoning appeals. But she also involves herself in a lot of other areas for the town. As a result, Dixon has been named municipal employee of the year by the Maryland Municipal League Inc. A plaque will be presented to her during the league's convention in Ocean City, scheduled for June 26-29, said Karen A. Liskey, assistant executive director of the league and its convention manager.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
Sol Nathan, a lifelong resident of Baltimore and retired municipal employee, died Wednesday at the Milford Manor Nursing home of Parkinson's disease, from which he had suffered for many years. He was 84. Born in Baltimore and raised on Violet Avenue, Mr. Nathan was a 1936 graduate of City College and, three years later, the University of Baltimore Law School. He was a buyer for city government from 1969 until his retirement in 1984. He was a stickler for ensuring that the city received full value for its payment for services from vendors, his family said.
NEWS
February 28, 1991
For decades nothing seemed safer than a government job. No longer. Governments, just like private businesses, must respond to economic difficulties by cutting costs and personnel.A case in point is Baltimore City, where municipal unions have until today to agree to defer their negotiated salary raises. If unions do not agree, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, facing a $54.1 million shortfall, may have to lay off as many as 2,400 of the city government's 28,100 employees."These are tough times for anyone to be in the position of searching for work," the mayor warned in personal letters to municipal employees.
NEWS
April 7, 1995
Maintenance workers in Anne Arundel County schools won't get a pay raise but will keep their top-of-the-line health insurance program under a contract proposal ratified by the school board this week.Local 1693 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) became the first of three school employee unions to settle with the board on a contract. The board ratified the contract at its meeting Wednesday; a formal union vote will be conducted at the union's next meeting.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 7, 2002
SALISBURY - Service employees at Salisbury University voted yesterday to be represented by the Maryland Classified Employees Association in a runoff election between MCEA and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The 250-person Salisbury chapter is the largest group to vote for MCEA representation under a state law allowing collective bargaining at public campuses.
NEWS
July 8, 2001
BALTIMORE CITY rewards non-work instead of work. Some $30.6 million a year could be saved if the city's generous employee health insurance program was adjusted to private-sector levels, absenteeism was reduced to the national standard and the lavish accident-leave policy was renegotiated. These are among key findings of an important $40,000 study that urges Mayor Martin O'Malley to completely overhaul the city's employment practices. The 141 pages of analysis and recommendations by the Greater Baltimore Committee and the Presidents' Roundtable are political dynamite because they would require concessions and cooperation from 15,800 municipal employees and their unions.
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