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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
A dozen or more cases of mumps have been reported among Loyola University Maryland students over the past month, prompting officials to alert the campus community to signs of the rare virus that has spread rapidly across college campuses in recent outbreaks. That's as many cases as have occurred in a typical year statewide since 2005, when the state health department started tracking outbreaks. Confirmed and suspected infections were found in undergraduate students in multiple class years and living both on and off Loyola's North Baltimore campus.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
A dozen or more cases of mumps have been reported among Loyola University Maryland students over the past month, prompting officials to alert the campus community to signs of the rare virus that has spread rapidly across college campuses in recent outbreaks. That's as many cases as have occurred in a typical year statewide since 2005, when the state health department started tracking outbreaks. Confirmed and suspected infections were found in undergraduate students in multiple class years and living both on and off Loyola's North Baltimore campus.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2007
BOSTON -- State health officials across New England are on alert after dozens of cases of mumps have been confirmed or suspected in Maine. Fifteen cases have been confirmed in Maine since September, and 57 more are suspected, said Geoff Beckett, the assistant state epidemiologist. While no cases have been confirmed in other New England states since September, officials fear the disease could spread quickly, particularly because of the region's abundance of college students, who are thought to be at particular risk.
SPORTS
February 24, 2011
April 20, 1968: The Orioles beat the California Angels, 10-1, but Frank Robinson left the game with a sore neck. The whole team received shots because the Angels’ team doctor thought Robinson had the mumps.
NEWS
By JIA-RUI CHONG and JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2006
Federal health authorities said yesterday that they are rushing 25,000 doses of mumps vaccine to the Midwest in an effort to control the largest mumps outbreak in 20 years. Since the first cases were detected in Iowa in December, mumps has infected 1,165 people in at least eight Midwestern states, said Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We're not going to be surprised to see more cases in more states," she said at a new conference in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1995
About 8,600 Baltimore schoolchildren who were given until late September to get immunized have not done so and will receive letters Tuesday barring them from classes, a school spokeswoman said yesterday.About 13,000 students received warning letters Sept. 6 that they had until Sept. 26 to provide proof their shots were up to date, as required by state law. Of those, about 8,600 are still listed as not complying, according to a computer tally yesterday, said school spokeswoman Robyn Washington.
SPORTS
February 24, 2011
April 20, 1968: The Orioles beat the California Angels, 10-1, but Frank Robinson left the game with a sore neck. The whole team received shots because the Angels’ team doctor thought Robinson had the mumps.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
Maurice Hilleman, 85, who helped develop vaccines for mumps, measles, chicken pox and other childhood scourges, died of cancer yesterday at a Philadelphia hospital. Dr. Hilleman worked for Merck & Co. Inc. for nearly 30 years before retiring in 1984 as senior vice president of Merck Research Labs. Over his career, the Montana native led or began the development of vaccines against diseases that once killed or hospitalized millions, including measles, German measles, meningitis, pneumonia and hepatitis.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | January 10, 1991
Spurred by a rash of measles and mumps outbreaks in recent years, county health officials plan to offer free booster vaccinations to all seventh-graders this spring.The Anne Arundel Health Department received 4,746 doses of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine through a federal contract aimed at stemming a nationwide upsurge in measles cases.Last April, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported a two-thirds increase in measles cases across the country. Maryland witnessed a parallel upswing, with 212 measles cases reported in 1990, compared to 113 cases in 1989.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | May 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Here's a real shot in the arm for Maryland schoolchildren: Gov. William Donald Schaefer and state health officials yesterday directed every child in Maryland entering kindergarten or the sixth grade this fall to have two doses of measles' vaccine. Currently, youngsters only need one measles vaccination.The increased dosage was ordered after an outbreak of 500 measles cases in Maryland during the past three years -- a jump from the normal three-year rate of 50 to 60 cases.Health department officials say they have concluded that a single immunization sometimes wears off as children get older, or simply fails to give enough protection for 5 percent to 10 percent of those vaccinated.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 25, 2007
BOSTON -- State health officials across New England are on alert after dozens of cases of mumps have been confirmed or suspected in Maine. Fifteen cases have been confirmed in Maine since September, and 57 more are suspected, said Geoff Beckett, the assistant state epidemiologist. While no cases have been confirmed in other New England states since September, officials fear the disease could spread quickly, particularly because of the region's abundance of college students, who are thought to be at particular risk.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
Ornithology Bird may know who thieves are When Western scrub-jays put food aside for the future, they typically watch over their shoulders (or wings) to see whether other scrub-jays are watching them. That's because scrub-jays like to raid one another's food supplies. Now, research by scientists at the University of Cambridge in England shows that scrub-jays may actually remember which birds were watching when they stored the food. And they use that knowledge the next time to decide whether to stash the goodies in a different place to avoid having it stolen.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 21, 2006
An unusual outbreak of mumps that began last month among college students in Iowa is prompting renewed calls for young people to make sure they've had the recommended two doses of the mumps vaccine. "The college kids in Iowa were in pre-school in the time when the second dose wasn't required there," said Dr. Julia A. McMillan, professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "So there's a relatively large number ... who didn't get their second dose, 20 percent of whom would be susceptible to mumps."
NEWS
By JIA-RUI CHONG and JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2006
Federal health authorities said yesterday that they are rushing 25,000 doses of mumps vaccine to the Midwest in an effort to control the largest mumps outbreak in 20 years. Since the first cases were detected in Iowa in December, mumps has infected 1,165 people in at least eight Midwestern states, said Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We're not going to be surprised to see more cases in more states," she said at a new conference in Atlanta.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
Maurice Hilleman, 85, who helped develop vaccines for mumps, measles, chicken pox and other childhood scourges, died of cancer yesterday at a Philadelphia hospital. Dr. Hilleman worked for Merck & Co. Inc. for nearly 30 years before retiring in 1984 as senior vice president of Merck Research Labs. Over his career, the Montana native led or began the development of vaccines against diseases that once killed or hospitalized millions, including measles, German measles, meningitis, pneumonia and hepatitis.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 11, 1996
I AM THE QUEEN," she said. "Everything you need to know starts with that fact."Standing over her kitchen sink, her anger and agitation churning the soapy water, she was washing dishes and recounting to me the moment when her relationship with her children had changed.Not right away, perhaps. It occurred to me that they might have recognized the scene she was describing as the periodic price of doing business with Mom and kept their heads down until it was over.But for this woman, it was life-changing.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
City school and health officials have set Friday as the deadline for an estimated 1,500 children who have missed a month of school to return with proof they have obtained immunizations -- or their parents will risk fines and possibly jail.Yesterday, State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy agreed to prosecute the parents or guardians using the state compulsory school attendance law. Conviction carries a possible maximum jail term of 10 days or fines of $50 a day for every day missed.Some of the students have missed classes since Sept.
NEWS
May 19, 2006
Ornithology Bird may know who thieves are When Western scrub-jays put food aside for the future, they typically watch over their shoulders (or wings) to see whether other scrub-jays are watching them. That's because scrub-jays like to raid one another's food supplies. Now, research by scientists at the University of Cambridge in England shows that scrub-jays may actually remember which birds were watching when they stored the food. And they use that knowledge the next time to decide whether to stash the goodies in a different place to avoid having it stolen.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
City school and health officials have set Friday as the deadline for an estimated 1,500 children who have missed a month of school to return with proof they have obtained immunizations -- or their parents will risk fines and possibly jail.Yesterday, State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy agreed to prosecute the parents or guardians using the state compulsory school attendance law. Conviction carries a possible maximum jail term of 10 days or fines of $50 a day for every day missed.Some of the students have missed classes since Sept.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1995
About 8,600 Baltimore schoolchildren who were given until late September to get immunized have not done so and will receive letters Tuesday barring them from classes, a school spokeswoman said yesterday.About 13,000 students received warning letters Sept. 6 that they had until Sept. 26 to provide proof their shots were up to date, as required by state law. Of those, about 8,600 are still listed as not complying, according to a computer tally yesterday, said school spokeswoman Robyn Washington.
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