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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Ronn Wade gingerly picked up the package wrapped in a simple white sheet and placed it on an examining table before slowly unwrapping the layers. And there it was. The mummified remains of a small child that had disappeared from University of Maryland School of Medicine years ago. With one look Wade knew it was part of the famed Burns Collection, an obscure set of medical mummies once used for dissection and the training of medical students and...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The dead are coming to Baltimore. Not, unfortunately, the Grateful kind, or the living kind that seem to be all the rage these days. Instead, the dead arriving in Baltimore are genuinely dead - 45 human and animal mummies that will be taking up residence at the Maryland Science Center through Jan. 20. "Mummies of the World" is an unprecedented traveling exhibition of mummies and mummy-related artifacts that has been setting up at museums and...
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1994
Maryland's health secretary yesterday called for the firing of the official who is using state facilities to mummify a Maryland man.But in calling for the termination of Ron Wade, executive director of the Maryland Anatomy Board, Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini did not take issue with the mummy project itself but with what he considered Mr. Wade's "poor taste" and "insensitivity" in describing the experiment to The Sun."The comments and the cavalier handling of this thing was totally unprofessional and showed a lack of judgment and poor taste," Mr. Sabatini said late yesterday.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
James L. Akers Jr., a retired financial analyst and businessman who collected and restored vintage arcade machines, died Wednesday of kidney cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 73. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, James Lee Akers Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Stoneleigh. Herbert W. Dorsey grew up a few doors away, and they remained lifelong friends. "It was a neighborhood of boys, and we naturally gravitated to his home because Jim had a pool table," said Mr. Dorsey, a retired Public Health Service officer who lives in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
The 200-year-old mummified remains of a small child are making their way back to the University of Maryland School of Medicine after an absence in which they were posted for sale on eBay and languished for almost five years in a Michigan police evidence room. The effort to identify the mummy's home and return it was aided by a Port Huron, Mich., police lieutenant, a couple of astute Michigan anthropologists and the curator of a mummy collection originally assembled by a convicted 19th-century Scottish grave robber.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Vikan and By Gary Vikan,Special to the Sun | June 3, 2001
"The Mummy Congress: Science, Obsession, and the Everlasting Dead," by Heather Pringle. Theia. 368 pages. $23.95. This gruesomely compelling book, written by a science journalist and frequent contributor to Discover magazine, is devoted to an eccentric group of about 200 scientists who convene every three years in some exotic spot naturally conducive to mummification -- most recently, in the little Chilean town of Aria, bordering the driest place on...
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
Archaeologists in Peru have discovered a 15-century-old mummy of a tattooed Moche woman entombed with a dazzling collection of weapons and jewelry. The woman, clearly a member of royalty, was buried with a sacrificed teenage slave at her feet and surrounded by multiple signs of femininity, including precious jewelry, golden needles and bejeweled spindles and spindle whorls for spinning cotton. But her burial bundle also contained gilded copper-clad war clubs and finely crafted spear throwers -- objects never before seen in a Moche woman's tomb.
FEATURES
October 25, 1997
Just in time for Halloween, "Under Wraps" (7 p.m.-8: 35 p.m., Disney) presents three 12-year- olds who discover a 3,000- year-old mummy and accidentally set him free. But he can't survive in the modern world, so they have to find a way to help him. The new made-for-cable family movie stars Bill Fagerbakke, Adam Wylie, Mario Yedidia and Clara Bryant.Pub Date: 10/25/97
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1994
It's a wrap.Researchers working at the University of Maryland School of Medicine completed an Egyptian-style mummification yesterday of a Baltimore area man when they swaddled his body head to toe in 100 yards of linen. It appears to be the first time in at least 1,800 years that a human being has been mummified using ancient Egyptian techniques."We are seeing a pretty good replica of what the ancient embalmer would have seen 2,000 years ago," said Bob Brier, a professor of ancient philosophy at C. W. Post University in New Yorkwhose unlikely, 15-year dream of performing an Egyptian mummification has been realized.
FEATURES
November 13, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Universal Pictures is opening its horror vaults to resurrect some venerable movie monsters.Currently in development there: "Clive Barker's 'The Mummy,' " from the horror novelist who wrote and directed "Hellraiser." And director John Carpenter, who remade RKO's "The Thing" for Universal in 1982, has gone fishing for "The Creature From the Black Lagoon."Universal "used to make a lot of monster movies, and they'd love to do them again if they can find people to do them," Carpenter says.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Ronn Wade gingerly picked up the package wrapped in a simple white sheet and placed it on an examining table before slowly unwrapping the layers. And there it was. The mummified remains of a small child that had disappeared from University of Maryland School of Medicine years ago. With one look Wade knew it was part of the famed Burns Collection, an obscure set of medical mummies once used for dissection and the training of medical students and...
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
The 200-year-old mummified remains of a small child are making their way back to the University of Maryland School of Medicine after an absence in which they were posted for sale on eBay and languished for almost five years in a Michigan police evidence room. The effort to identify the mummy's home and return it was aided by a Port Huron, Mich., police lieutenant, a couple of astute Michigan anthropologists and the curator of a mummy collection originally assembled by a convicted 19th-century Scottish grave robber.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liz Atwood | October 12, 2008
Trick or Treat on Monster Street By Danny Schnitzlein and illustrator Matt Faulkner Peachtree / 32 pages / ages 4-8 / $16.95 A boy who fears monsters and things that goes bump in the night dreads the approach of Halloween. While his older brothers dress in terrifying costumes, he wears a bunny suit when he goes out trick or treating. He thinks his worst fears are about to come true when he becomes lost in the woods. Creepy sounds, eerie trees, lightning and thunder send the boy running to the nearest house.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 1, 2008
Three yetis, a yak and a couple of yuks. That's all you get in the way of original entertainment in The Mummy: The Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, an extravagant and frenetic third entry in the franchise about adventurer Rick O'Connell (Brendan Fraser) and his continuing fights with the embalmed yet undead. It's like an Indiana Jones movie without rhythm, wit or personality, just a desperate, headlong pace. It does have a sense of the ridiculous (one character declares "You guys are like mummy magnets!"
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
For years it has been a quiet mystery in a glass case at the Walters Art Museum, where it rested a few feet from a 4,000-year-old coffin in what is known as the Afterlife Room. But yesterday the 5-foot, 2,900-year-old mummy traveled by truck to University of Maryland Medical Center for its first-ever CT scan to see whether scientists can learn more about it - including whether "it" is a he or a she. For the mummy and its retinue, the biggest challenge was the same one facing everyone negotiating Baltimore's midday traffic: getting there in one piece.
NEWS
March 4, 2007
When American Dime Museum owner-curator Dick Horne auctioned off his mass of oddities Monday, he raised $107,000 but kissed goodbye such wonders as a 9-foot Peruvian mummy ($3,000) and a monkey automaton ($2,100). Now that fate has banged down its gavel on the Dime, we wondered: What is Baltimore's quirkiest collection now? Do you own 3,241 pairs of bowling shoes? Is your cousin's basement overrun with Elvis hairpieces? Does your friend have an entire room devoted to gourds that resemble politicians?
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2002
"There's something very mysterious about a mummy head in a box," says Dick Horne, co-owner of the American Dime Museum. Who would argue the point? Especially once you know that Horne in his day has known a mummy or two from the inside out. He makes them from a bit of this and that, secret materials and methods he declines to discuss. Even a mummy maven like Horne, however, has been stumped as to the true nature of the giant Peruvian Amazon she-mummy lying in a glass case just inside his museum's front door.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | June 19, 1994
A University of Maryland medical school official said yesterday that he was "shocked" at the state health secretary's suggestion that he should be fired for his remarks about his project to mummify a Maryland man.Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini did not take issue with the mummy project itself. But, on Friday he said that Ronald S. Wade, director of the anatomical service division at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, should be fired for what Mr. Sabatini called Mr. Wade's "poor taste" and "insensitivity" in describing the experiment to The Sun."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Ronn Wade wants his mummy back. It's a quest that started in October, when Michigan authorities confiscated the mummified cadaver of a child illegally placed for sale on eBay. The incident briefly made headlines around the world. And Wade, director of the anatomical services division at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is convinced the body is part of an obscure but historic set of medical mummies known as the Burns collection.
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