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BUSINESS
August 8, 1997
Shares of Ciena Corp. dropped more than 8 percent yesterday as more than half of the telecommunications equipment company's shares became available for public trading.More than 13 million shares changed hands, making it one of the most heavily traded shares on the Nasdaq market.About 55 million of the Linthicum-based company's more than 104 million outstanding shares were freed from a so-called lock-up agreement yesterday and became available for public trading.The company went public in February and was an immediate favorite among investors.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
Avatar," the most high-profile, fiercely debated and expensive 3-D film in history, is poised to become something more than a conversation piece or a mega-blockbuster. If its writer-director, James Cameron, manages to flood the pop-cultural mainstream as he did with his last film, "Titanic," it could transform the way people view entertainment not just on movie screens but on TVs and personal computers. David Modell, former president and CEO of the Baltimore Ravens and now chairman of the board of the technology company 3ality Digital, thinks the game has already changed.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
Ciena Corp., a Linthicum telecommunications equipment company, has taken another step in building its international presence by signing an exclusive one-year contract to provide its products to Hermes Europe Railtel BV of Belgium.The deal was to be announced this morning. Financial details of the transaction were not immediately available.Ciena makes dense wavelength division multiplexing -- or DWDM -- equipment, which expands the capacity of networks by converting one communications channel into several.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 9, 2008
The IMAX experience, long associated with huge movie screens in specially constructed theaters usually attached to museums, is coming to a multiplex near you. Theaters in White Marsh and Columbia already are offering films in IMAX, part of an agreement between the Canadian-based film company responsible for the technology and the AMC theater chain to install digital-projection IMAX on 100 screens in 33 U.S. markets through 2010. So far, 25 screens have been installed. Columbia's, in July, was among the first.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1998
In a move that could help set the stage for faster Internet transmissions, Ciena Corp. and Cisco Systems Inc. yesterday agreed to link their network equipment.The accord is potentially significant because of the two companies' prominence in the rapidly evolving field of digital networks.Ciena, based in Linthicum, is one of the leading makers of dense wavelength division multiplexing -- or DWDM -- equipment. DWDM turns one communications channel into several, increasing the capacity of a network.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
As Ciena Corp. stock resumed its upward climb yesterday with a 27 percent rise, the Linthicum company for the first time confirmed that it has found a new buyer for its telecommunications equipment.Ciena declined to identify its new customer or the size of the sales contract.Company spokesman Denny Bilter said the identity of the customer would be made public before Dec. 10, the day Ciena is scheduled to release its fiscal fourth-quarter earnings report.Murmurings of a possible new contract have helped turn Ciena's once-moribund stock into one of Wall Street's strongest gainers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Ciena Corp.'s stock continued to claw its way back from the abyss yesterday, gaining 26 percent amid a rebound in technology stocks and persistent rumors that the company might be a takeover target.The Linthicum-based telecommunications equipment company's stock rose $3.1875 to close at $15.4375, its highest closing price since Sept. 22. Ciena was the most heavily traded stock in U.S. markets yesterday, with 31.05 million shares changing hands.There is speculation that Tellabs Inc., a Lisle, Ill.-based maker of telecommunications equipment, might renew its attempt to purchase Ciena.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
AT&T Corp. said yesterday that it will put equipment from Ciena Corp. through intensive field tests with an eye toward becoming a Ciena customer as early as next year, a move that could bring hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of business to the Linthicum-based company that is already one of the fastest-growing start-ups ever.The announcement, made at an industry trade show in New Orleans, had been rumored ever since Ciena went public in February and commanded a market value of $3.4 billion at the end of its first day of trading.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTSWestinghouse Electric Corp. in Baltimore won a $10,078,627 contract from the Navy to produce and develop test progress sets and operational test program sets for the airborne self-protection jammer weapon replaceable assemblies to be used with the consolidated automated support system.AAI Corp. in Hunt Valley won an $8,612,257 contract from the Air Force to provide a simulator for Electronic Combat Training that will replace the T-4 and T-5 simulators and provide flight training in conjunction with Air Training Command's Specialized Undergraduate Navigator Training at Randolph AFB, Texas.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
Ciena Corp. shares plummeted to an all-time low yesterday after one of its customers awarded a $100 million telecommunications equipment contract to one of the Linthicum-based company's rivals, raising further questions about whether Tellabs Inc.'s purchase of Ciena will go forward.Ciena stock fell $8.5313 to $19.75, the lowest closing price since Ciena began trading on Feb. 7, 1997, at $23 per share. The stock lost 30 percent of its value yesterday, and has suffered a stunning 68 percent decline since the Tellabs-Ciena deal was announced June 3.Yesterday's decline came on the news that Digital Teleport Inc. had chosen Pirelli SpA as the primary supplier of dense wavelength division multiplexing -- or DWDM -- equipment, which allows phone lines to carry more calls and Internet messages.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2006
Baltimore will get its first new movie complex in more than 20 years next spring - a bet on downtown's growing lure as a place to live and play as well as work. A seven-screen cinema run by Landmark Theatres, a chain devoted to art and independent films, will open next spring as part of the long-planned entertainment centerpiece in Harbor East, the $1 billion waterfront community east of the Inner Harbor. The announcement was made yesterday by the developers, H&S Properties Development Corp.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - Remember when movies aimed to entertain? You could take the whole family and escape the quotidian for the silver screen, watching bigger-than-life heroes engage in daring and admirable deeds. Or you could share a few laughs without worrying about offensive double-entendres or scatological references. No more. Now, if Hollywood isn't drenching its audience in blood or titillating it with naked bodies, it is propagandizing us with left-wing paranoia or pushing a radical social agenda.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Malcolm Johnson and Malcolm Johnson,Special to the Sun | June 22, 2003
Of the more than 250 movies that have reaped domestic earnings of more than $100 million, only a dozen dramatize the victories and travails of comic-book superheroes. But all that is about to change, as a new wave of men and women in crazy costumes surges into action in big-budget films. It will be a battle of the titans, as the older generation of men in tights, and a scattering of super women, suit up to compete against the younger fighters against evil. The struggle will pit DC Comics, owner of the all-powerful Superman and Batman franchises, against Marvel Comics, which has suddenly thrust itself into the top ranks of movie moneymakers, as compiled by MovieTimes at UGO.com.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 8, 2002
Robert Altman's Gosford Park, which plants a spiral staircase of wit inside an upstairs-downstairs murder mystery, has been more long-lived and profitable at the Senator than most of the square, big-studio blockbusters the theater has showcased in recent years. Altman's picture now is set to play the Senator until the March 22 premiere of the refurbished print of E.T. The Senator's Tom Kiefaber says he's pleased, not surprised, adding: "Films like Howards End, Remains of the Day, The English Patient and Emma all had enviable legs at the Senator."
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
Twenty-eight hours before last night's grand opening of the expanded Charles Theater, "Wet Paint" signs hung on the walls, wires dangled, drills screamed and the popcorn machine had not been installed.By the time director John Waters and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke cut a ribbon of film at 8: 15 p.m. to celebrate the first showings on the four new screens, the 60-year-old theater had been transformed into a work of art."It is great to be here tonight to see the resurrection of a great Baltimore landmark," Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend told a crowd of more than 700. "Hopefully, this will lead a revitalization of the whole area."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mark Ribbing contributed to this article | December 27, 1998
Christmas arrived seven days earlier than expected for Howard County.A week after word leaked that Corvis Corp. intends to expand and create about 1,400 jobs in Howard County by 2001, county officials and business leaders are scrambling to assess the impact of the company's news.The anticipated increase from 96 to 1,500 employees would make the Columbia-based telecommunications equipment company the second-largest private employer in the county. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Fulton employs about 2,800 workers.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mark Ribbing contributed to this article | December 27, 1998
Christmas arrived seven days earlier than expected for Howard County.A week after word leaked that Corvis Corp. intends to expand and create about 1,400 jobs in Howard County by 2001, county officials and business leaders are scrambling to assess the impact of the company's news.The anticipated increase from 96 to 1,500 employees would make the Columbia-based telecommunications equipment company the second-largest private employer in the county. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Fulton employs about 2,800 workers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
As Ciena Corp. stock resumed its upward climb yesterday with a 27 percent rise, the Linthicum company for the first time confirmed that it has found a new buyer for its telecommunications equipment.Ciena declined to identify its new customer or the size of the sales contract.Company spokesman Denny Bilter said the identity of the customer would be made public before Dec. 10, the day Ciena is scheduled to release its fiscal fourth-quarter earnings report.Murmurings of a possible new contract have helped turn Ciena's once-moribund stock into one of Wall Street's strongest gainers.
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