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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 20, 2001
The table centerpieces in the Marriott Waterfront ballroom were composed around NFL footballs. Baltimore Ravens head coach Brian Billick and NASCAR driver Kelly Sutton were the evening's honorees. It all signaled another winning "2001 Dinner of Champions" for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Maryland Chapter. Event chair JR Paterakis got into the spirit, as he coached (or was it coaxed?) some of the 600 guests into the ballroom for the award presentations and dinner. Among those following the game plan: David Modell, event co-chair; Frank Glorioso and Steve de Castro, event committee members; Steve Zentz, MS Society, Maryland Chapter board chair; Mark Dumler, John D. Ryder, James Little, Dr. Ken Johnson, Kevin R. Oster, Chris Scholtes and Tim Zulick, board members; Rick Smith, chapter president; Lynn Brick, Brick Bodies president; Bill Hellmann, RK&K Engineers partner; Grant Grasmick, Grasmick Lumber Co. president; Dr. Joyce Burd, York, Pa., rheumatologist; Dr. Peter Calabresi, University of Maryland Medical Center MS specialist; Krissy Edell, Comcast SportsNet senior account executive; Bruce Dunham, Morgan Stanley senior vice president; Alex Reynolds, H&S Bakery account manager; Dave Kelley, Aggressive Internet president; Brooke Ewing, Ralston Purina account executive; Tim Brown, Shoppers Food buyer; and Jim Austin, Buck Distributing Co. special projects manager.
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FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Bicycling isn't usually fodder for Jeremy Conn, co-host of the popular Scott Garceau sports show on 105.7 The Fan. But the Bike MS: Chesapeake Challenge had a particular meaning for the Baltimore County native. His wife, recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, participated in it. "You don't realize how many people are affected by it until you start talking about it," says Conn, whose job is to discuss the Ravens, Orioles and big sports stories of the day. "I get texts, emails and Facebook messages from others dealing with this too. … I'm always surprised by the power of radio.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | March 19, 1991
Current volunteers' news and needs:Multiple Sclerosis Society wants volunteers for its Super Cities Walk in Towson. Volunteers should meet from 2 to 4 p.m. March 23 in the conference center at Sheppard Pratt for orientation and training. Contact the society at 821-8626.United Way of Central Maryland's 1990 campaign took in a record $31,950,170, a 3.4 percent increase over 1989. The UN referred 2,500 volunteers to non-profit organizations as well as forming a Corporate Volunteer Council, a coalition of businesses which share employee volunteers for community service projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sometimes, late at night, Glennae Williams is startled awake by a crash. "Are you ok, Ma?" she calls to her mother. Her mother, DaVeeda White, has fallen again. She gets up to use the bathroom and her legs collapse, just as they have been collapsing since Glennae was a little girl. "I'm on the floor," White calls back. She knows her daughter will come. These are not the kinds of nights one associates with the last exhausted, exuberant, anxious weeks of college. Williams stays up late cramming for finals and fretting about grades, then rushes off to work in the morning.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
Scientists said yesterday that two experimental drugs reduce the flare-ups that blur vision, upset balance and impede the movement of people afflicted with multiple sclerosis -- a common neurological disease that only recently was considered untreatable.A national trial involving one of the drugs, copolymer-1, was directed by the University of Maryland.Producers of the two drugs plan to ask the Food and Drug Administration next year for commercial approval. Last year, the FDA approved sales of the first drug, Betaseron, ever to show progress against the course of the disease.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | May 3, 1994
The Bowie/Crofton Multiple Sclerosis Support Group will meet at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Adult Day Care Center of Bowie, 3112 Belair Drive. A speaker from the White House staff will discuss the Clinton health plan. The group meets the first Thursday of each month.For information, you may call 721-1537 or 793-3896.*St. Stephen's Church, 1110 St. Stephens Church Road, will hold its annual spring dinner from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday. The menu will include baked ham, turkey salad, potatoes, string beans, corn pudding, a cranberry mold, rolls, peach shortcake with whipped cream and beverages.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2000
WHEN DONNA Goonan attended the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Maryland chapter volunteer awards ceremony in October, the last thing she expected was to hear her name announced as MS Family of the Year. "I was just very surprised," Goonan said, admitting she didn't pay much attention to the listing of the winner's accomplishments because she figured someone else had won. "I just assumed that all families did that." But, according to society employees in Hunt Valley, the Goonan family's dedication to the organization, and each other, is far from ordinary.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | October 7, 1990
The link between Julie van Hemert and Adam Malinda began as one kind of nourishment and has grown into another.Van Hemert, a Meals on Wheels volunteer for nearly a decade, has delivered dinner every Tuesday for four years to Malinda, a multiple sclerosis sufferer who spends most of his waking hours in a wheelchair.But over the last eight months, van Hemert has been feeding Malinda in another way: She has served as his mentor in sculpture, bringing him books and magazines about the art, sharing her expertise and encouraging him in the craft.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | October 17, 1990
Feel lucky? Want to donate to a worthy cause? Wish you could go to Atlantic City but don't have the time? The Golden Flame Restaurant on Route 175 in Odenton is hosting a Mini Bull Roast and Atlantic City Day from 1 to 8 p.m.Oct. 21. Tickets are $12 per person and include a buffet with ham, sausage and beef, all prepared on an open pit, plus potato salad, cole slaw and all the trimmings.All types of games of chance and money wheels will be on hand for you to try your luck, with all of the proceeds donated to the Maryland Chapter of the Multiple Sclerosis Society.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
Mel Buckowitz has been stung by bees about 400 times in the past two months.Mr. Buckowitz is not the victim of an incredible streak of bad luck, but the willing recipient of stings for medicinal purposes.Except for a seven-month period, he has been stung 10 to 15 times daily since December 1991.Mr. Buckowitz, 58, of Randallstown, subjects himself to this regimen in an attempt to treat the multiple sclerosis that has weakened his body for the past 11 years.And he says it works.Since he began to get stung, he says, his condition has improved dramatically.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Franklin Walter Vanik, who became an advocate for those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, died Friday at his parents' Rosedale home after suffering a head injury in an earlier fall. He was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale, he was the son of Franklin Louis Vanik, a retired Crown Cork and Seal mechanical engineer, and Gertrude M. Vanik, an administrative assistant. He attended Red House Run Elementary School and Holabird Junior High School, where his teachers recognized his academic ability and recommended him for a newly created gifted and talented program.
ENTERTAINMENT
Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The show opens with Aloe Blacc performing "Wake Me Up. " This is one of those songs that I've heard a million times but couldn't have told you the title or the singer. Now that we've gotten rid of a few couples, we should go back to the individual walk-out, long-form introductions, but they're just coming in from the side of the stage instead of down the stairs. They're also entering to the house band's rendition of "Wake Me Up" instead of my beloved cheesy "Dancing with the Stars" theme music.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | September 29, 2013
Gene "Cousin Luke" Petit passed away Sunday morning, according to a report from Mike Johnson of PWInsider . The cause of death is currently unknown. Petit had been suffering from multiple sclerosis in recent years, which caused him to lose a considerable amount of weight. Petit is best known as portraying "Cousin Luke" in WWE in 1985 and 1986 as part of Hillbilly Jim's family. Hillbilly Jim is now the only member still alive -- Uncle Elmer (Stan Frazier) died in 1992 from kidney failure and Cousin Junior (Larry Kean)
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Anna Whetstone, 23, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was 17. She was a high school junior in Hershey, Pa., playing on her school's field hockey team when she got hit in the head with a ball. "I was feeling fine at the time," she said, but over the next few days she had trouble with balance and "wasn't feeling well overall. " Computed tomography scans and an MRI discovered the telltale lesions that are signs of the degenerative disease. After the diagnosis, Whetstone switched from playing to coaching field hockey, but she continued dancing and she earned a neuroscience degree, with honors, at Moravian College in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 24, 2013
More than 500 participants came together last Sunday, April 21, for Walk MS Aberdeen to raise funds and awareness for all those affected by multiple sclerosis. The walk was held at the Ripken Stadium and is expected to raise $60,000, according to the National MS Society, Maryland Chapter.  "Walk MS is all about communities joining together to do something about multiple sclerosis NOW," said Mark Roeder, president of the National MS Society, Maryland Chapter. "MS is the number one disabling disease among young adults.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Judith S. Campbell, a retired commodity futures broker, died of multiple sclerosis Monday at her Parkton home. She was 61. Judith Sheffield was born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale. After graduating from Overlea High School in 1969, she earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from what is now Towson University. While living in Denver, Mrs. Campbell became a licensed commodity futures broker. In the 1970s, she joined Campbell & Co. in Baltimore, which had been co-founded by her husband, Kevin B. Campbell, in 1972.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2000
Martin Goren, a former banker and owner of the Homewood Deli who was a tireless advocate for people with multiple sclerosis, died Wednesday of the disease at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 55 and lived in the Tuscany-Canterbury section of North Baltimore. While in his 30s, Mr. Goren began noticing blind spots, which later were diagnosed as the first symptoms of MS. Within 10 years, his body had been taken over by the disease. "He was deprived of the use of his entire body. He could not move even a finger and was confined during the last decade of his life to a bed," said Louis Berney, his brother-in-law, who is director of media relations for the University of Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Bicycling isn't usually fodder for Jeremy Conn, co-host of the popular Scott Garceau sports show on 105.7 The Fan. But the Bike MS: Chesapeake Challenge had a particular meaning for the Baltimore County native. His wife, recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, participated in it. "You don't realize how many people are affected by it until you start talking about it," says Conn, whose job is to discuss the Ravens, Orioles and big sports stories of the day. "I get texts, emails and Facebook messages from others dealing with this too. … I'm always surprised by the power of radio.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
Carol R. Hill, a former bartender who was working as an artist, died Oct. 3 of undetermined causes at her home in Triangle, Va. The former 20-year Fells Point resident was 51. Ms. Hill had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis about five years ago, her sister said. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy and have been told that it may take up until 12 weeks," said her sister, Sharon Bohon of Skippack, Pa. The former Carol Read was born in Shelbyville, Ind., and was raised in Center Valley, Pa., where she graduated in 1978 from Southern Lehigh High School.
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