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Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
Today Mary Patricia Helinski, threatened with losing her job, was planning to go back to work for the first time in several months, even though she's afraid her workplace could kill her.Her doctor, Grace Ziem, agrees. Her employer, Bell Atlantic Corp., doesn't.Pat Helinski's story is one of a growing number of cases that pit ailing employees against doubtful employers in legal and moral struggles over a baffling disorder. Called multiple chemical sensitivity, it leaves sufferers vulnerable to a wide variety of substances found in the workplace.
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NEWS
December 26, 2001
Other ailing veterans of the Gulf War also deserve compensation The Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) decision to compensate 40 Gulf War veterans its researchers have found with Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS), without waiting for peer review or publication of the study involved, is commendable. But this is not the first disease to be statistically linked with service in the Gulf War, as The Sun mistakenly reported ("ALS, gulf war link piques scientists' interest," Dec. 12). Many government researchers, including the VA's Deputy Undersecretary for Health, Dr. Frances M. Murphy, have published papers since 1999 documenting similar and even greater increases among Gulf War veterans in chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple chemical sensitivity and their symptoms.
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NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Inside the nation's first subsidized housing for the chemically sensitive, the molecules are flying.Once hailed by some as a sanctuary for people allergic to the chemicals of modern life, while ridiculed by others as a nonsolution to a nonexistent medical problem, the experiment at the trim, gray-and-white apartment building known as Ecology House has turned into something of a disaster.The 11-unit building, built last year in a San Rafael residential area with a heavy contribution from the federal government, was the idea of a concerned local group.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2000
For most of us in Baltimore, the annual visit to the gravesite of Edgar Allan Poe is a romantic mystery. What other writer so inflamed the public's imagination that a cloaked "Visitor" would arrive at his grave every year for 50 years, bearing cognac and three roses? Will he appear again this year? We will know the answer early Wednesday morning, the 191st anniversary of Poe's birth. But Baltimorean Albert Donnay finds the ritual a little worrisome. The cognac -- well, chances are, he says, Poe was actually intolerant of alcohol, despite the fact that his death often has been attributed to imbibing.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
The county Office of Human Rights has rejected a Catonsville woman's allegations that the managers of a Columbia condominium denied her use of her home by using lawn care and other chemicals to which she is allergic.The decision, in which the county agency ruled there was not enough evidence to pursue a housing discrimination case, was the second defeat Ivy Lurie Bormel has sustained in her efforts to get a discrimination ruling based on her disability, known medically as multiple chemical sensitivity.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
Other ailing veterans of the Gulf War also deserve compensation The Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) decision to compensate 40 Gulf War veterans its researchers have found with Lou Gehrig's disease (ALS), without waiting for peer review or publication of the study involved, is commendable. But this is not the first disease to be statistically linked with service in the Gulf War, as The Sun mistakenly reported ("ALS, gulf war link piques scientists' interest," Dec. 12). Many government researchers, including the VA's Deputy Undersecretary for Health, Dr. Frances M. Murphy, have published papers since 1999 documenting similar and even greater increases among Gulf War veterans in chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple chemical sensitivity and their symptoms.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2000
For most of us in Baltimore, the annual visit to the gravesite of Edgar Allan Poe is a romantic mystery. What other writer so inflamed the public's imagination that a cloaked "Visitor" would arrive at his grave every year for 50 years, bearing cognac and three roses? Will he appear again this year? We will know the answer early Wednesday morning, the 191st anniversary of Poe's birth. But Baltimorean Albert Donnay finds the ritual a little worrisome. The cognac -- well, chances are, he says, Poe was actually intolerant of alcohol, despite the fact that his death often has been attributed to imbibing.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
When David Pugh's mother-in-law used to visit, he got sick. His stomach churned, eyes watered and head pounded seconds after this stylish Italian woman clutched him in her arms. It wasn't her display of affection that sent him racing to the medicine chest; it was her Liz Taylor perfume.After years of sniffing and saying nothing, Mr. Pugh, an allergy sufferer, has become an activist for his respiratory rights -- even if it means confronting relatives about their grooming habits."I feel like a bloodhound sometimes -- picking up scents that aren't offensive to most people," says Mr. Pugh, 37, a graphic designer who lives in Hamilton.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun research librarian Robert Schrott contributed to this article | October 18, 1996
Over the years, ABC News correspondent John Stossel has bolstered his career by setting up sting operations, and then ambushing the targets of his investigations with producers and cameramen.But in Baltimore, the tables have been turned on Stossel.The mustachioed host of ABC's "20/20" and his producers are facing felony charges in Maryland for allegedly breaking state wiretap statutes, according to court records. Criminal complaints filed this month allege that Stossel and his team tape-recorded an interview with a Baltimore doctor without her knowledge.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | August 29, 1991
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Come to public meetings in Marin County, but please leave behind your fragrant Chanel No. 5, your pungent Obsession and your aromatic $300-an-ounce dab of Joy.Sandy Ross, president of Health & Habitat, a foundation devoted to a healthy environment, is taking her crusade for the rights of the chemically sensitive to City Hall.She has asked for a ban on fragrances at parks commission meetings and intends to do so at other government agencies.Perfume odors inhaled by chemically sensitive people can lead to a range of maladies, from dizziness and disorientation to incapacitating headaches and seizures, she said.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun research librarian Robert Schrott contributed to this article | October 18, 1996
Over the years, ABC News correspondent John Stossel has bolstered his career by setting up sting operations, and then ambushing the targets of his investigations with producers and cameramen.But in Baltimore, the tables have been turned on Stossel.The mustachioed host of ABC's "20/20" and his producers are facing felony charges in Maryland for allegedly breaking state wiretap statutes, according to court records. Criminal complaints filed this month allege that Stossel and his team tape-recorded an interview with a Baltimore doctor without her knowledge.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1995
When David Pugh's mother-in-law used to visit, he got sick. His stomach churned, eyes watered and head pounded seconds after this stylish Italian woman clutched him in her arms. It wasn't her display of affection that sent him racing to the medicine chest; it was her Liz Taylor perfume.After years of sniffing and saying nothing, Mr. Pugh, an allergy sufferer, has become an activist for his respiratory rights -- even if it means confronting relatives about their grooming habits."I feel like a bloodhound sometimes -- picking up scents that aren't offensive to most people," says Mr. Pugh, 37, a graphic designer who lives in Hamilton.
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun | April 23, 1995
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Inside the nation's first subsidized housing for the chemically sensitive, the molecules are flying.Once hailed by some as a sanctuary for people allergic to the chemicals of modern life, while ridiculed by others as a nonsolution to a nonexistent medical problem, the experiment at the trim, gray-and-white apartment building known as Ecology House has turned into something of a disaster.The 11-unit building, built last year in a San Rafael residential area with a heavy contribution from the federal government, was the idea of a concerned local group.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 11, 1994
Today Mary Patricia Helinski, threatened with losing her job, was planning to go back to work for the first time in several months, even though she's afraid her workplace could kill her.Her doctor, Grace Ziem, agrees. Her employer, Bell Atlantic Corp., doesn't.Pat Helinski's story is one of a growing number of cases that pit ailing employees against doubtful employers in legal and moral struggles over a baffling disorder. Called multiple chemical sensitivity, it leaves sufferers vulnerable to a wide variety of substances found in the workplace.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
The county Office of Human Rights has rejected a Catonsville woman's allegations that the managers of a Columbia condominium denied her use of her home by using lawn care and other chemicals to which she is allergic.The decision, in which the county agency ruled there was not enough evidence to pursue a housing discrimination case, was the second defeat Ivy Lurie Bormel has sustained in her efforts to get a discrimination ruling based on her disability, known medically as multiple chemical sensitivity.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | September 16, 1992
&TC WASHINGTON -- As Congress begins hearings today on th mysterious illnesses being reported by some veterans of Operation Desert Storm, a group of environmental physicians says it can supply some answers.A committee headed by Dr. Al Johnson of Dallas is developing diagnostic guidelines to help physicians identify whether Desert Storm vets are suffering from "multiple chemical sensitivity," a type of allergic reaction.The nine-member panel, formed two weeks ago by the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, is focusing on three environmental exposures in the Persian Gulf region: oil well fires, leaded gasoline and pesticides.
NEWS
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | November 21, 1993
CHICAGO -- What with the growing national stink over smoke, perfume and other now-questionable odors, it appears that the era of nasal correctness has arrived.About time, says a Chicago-area researcher who has long worked in obscurity to get some respect for the poor cousin of the five senses: smell.Dr. Alan R. Hirsch directs the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Center in Chicago's Water Tower Place shopping mall -- appropriately only a few floors above vast scent-laden cosmetic counters that have produced skirmishes in the aroma wars.
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