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Multiple Births

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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1995
Medical advances that allow once-infertile couples to have babies are producing an unintended side-effect that can bring joy or pain: more triplets, quadruplets and quintuplets than ever before.In the afterglow of last week's delivery of healthy quintuplets at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, obstetricians and fertility specialists admit they are concerned about the medical, financial and social costs that accompany a decade-long rise in multiple births.None of these worries, they say, diminishes the wonder felt by Ruth and David Good of York County, Pa., who said they never planned on a fivesome when they entered GBMC's fertility program but are thrilled with their new family.
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NEWS
February 28, 2009
Fans eager to pay for soccer stadium The Baltimore Sun has weighed in against a proposed soccer stadium in Prince George's County ("Another stadium?" editorial, Feb. 25). I must disagree with this conclusion. Major League Soccer is healthy and growing even in these very tough times. This soccer league is here to stay. And D.C. United is a flagship team for the league. A study funded by the Maryland Stadium Authority clearly finds this project would be a net benefit for the county and state.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 1998
MARANA, Ariz. -- Like so many other parents, they sent out a birth notice: "Mario and Jane Simeone proudly announce the birth of their new arrivals!" It listed the names of their triplets, the birth weights, lengths and birth date: June 21, 1997.There were also color photographs, which conveyed what the words could not: Amber Raquel in the yellow light of a neonatal incubator, the word "caution" visible on its side; Cheyenne Barbara with tubes sprouting from chest, legs, arms and hands; Mario Victor with a ventilator tube taped to his mouth.
NEWS
April 19, 2006
Programs announced for expecting parents Anne Arundel Medical Center will offer the following programs for expecting parents and family members: Clatanoff tour, a free one-hour tour of the Clatanoff Pavilion for mothers-to-be and their partners. Information on family-centered maternity care, visitor guidelines and birth practice. An abbreviated program for children is also offered. "Birth Class," in which expectant mothers and their partners receive information on normal labor and birth, anesthesia, birth technologies, Caesarean birth, and keeping your baby safe.
NEWS
By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 20, 1998
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- The latest advance in the 20-year-old in-vitro fertilization field may also resolve one of its thorniest ethical issues: the transfer of too many fertilized eggs, resulting in potentially dangerous and expensive triplet, quadruplet and quintuplet births.In September, an Orange County, Calif., clinic became one of a handful in the country that began growing fertilized eggs in a special nutritional solution for two or three extra days -- long enough for an eight-celled embryo to grow into one with too many cells to count.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Multiple births, sexually transmitted diseases and other infections are to blame for the 36 percent increase in infant mortality among African-Americans in the Baltimore area last year, according to a state investigation being released this morning.Through different routes, each of these can cause premature delivery, which in turn can lead to death.The lungs of these babies may not work well, their skin is so thin they may contract infections, or the fragile blood vessels in their brains may hemorrhage.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
A 50-YEAR-OLD Virginia great-grandmother has a child through in-vitro fertilization. Septuplets are born in Washington with the help of fertility drugs and technology. These phenomena represent epic advances in reproductive medicine that would have been unimaginable a generation ago. While stem-cell technology and genetic decoding pose ever new ethical quandaries for our society, these two maternities illustrate how long-standing questions surrounding reproductive bioethics remain unanswered.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Lan Nguyen and Carol L. Bowers and Lan Nguyen,Staff writers | February 23, 1992
Ellen and John Staab were blessed four times in December -- Blake Patrick, Brent Gerard, Shea Elizabeth, and Shannon Noelle. Since then, the Bel Air family has been blessed at least four-fold again by the generosity of friends and strangers."
NEWS
October 4, 2000
A Reisterstown woman gave birth to quadruplets yesterday at St. Agnes HealthCare in Southwest Baltimore. Lalaine Cruz, 29, was resting and in good condition yesterday after three girls and a boy were delivered between 1:34 p.m. and 1:37 p.m. by Caesarean section by Drs. Christos Hatjis and Ramada Smith. James Cruz, 43, said his wife used "very little" fertility drugs in trying to become pregnant. Multiple births are common in both families. Cruz said his wife's grandmother gave birth to four sets of twins, while both of his own parents have siblings who are sets of triplets.
NEWS
February 28, 2009
Fans eager to pay for soccer stadium The Baltimore Sun has weighed in against a proposed soccer stadium in Prince George's County ("Another stadium?" editorial, Feb. 25). I must disagree with this conclusion. Major League Soccer is healthy and growing even in these very tough times. This soccer league is here to stay. And D.C. United is a flagship team for the league. A study funded by the Maryland Stadium Authority clearly finds this project would be a net benefit for the county and state.
NEWS
By DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS and DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
In what probably will be reassuring to many couples considering fertility treatments, new research suggests that babies conceived with a little help from science are no more likely to have birth defects or chromosomal abnormalities than babies made the old-fashioned way. But women who become pregnant through in vitro fertilization may experience more complications during their pregnancy, the scientists cautioned. Multiple births are also much more common - and represent the single greatest health risk to babies conceived in that manner.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
A 50-YEAR-OLD Virginia great-grandmother has a child through in-vitro fertilization. Septuplets are born in Washington with the help of fertility drugs and technology. These phenomena represent epic advances in reproductive medicine that would have been unimaginable a generation ago. While stem-cell technology and genetic decoding pose ever new ethical quandaries for our society, these two maternities illustrate how long-standing questions surrounding reproductive bioethics remain unanswered.
NEWS
October 4, 2000
A Reisterstown woman gave birth to quadruplets yesterday at St. Agnes HealthCare in Southwest Baltimore. Lalaine Cruz, 29, was resting and in good condition yesterday after three girls and a boy were delivered between 1:34 p.m. and 1:37 p.m. by Caesarean section by Drs. Christos Hatjis and Ramada Smith. James Cruz, 43, said his wife used "very little" fertility drugs in trying to become pregnant. Multiple births are common in both families. Cruz said his wife's grandmother gave birth to four sets of twins, while both of his own parents have siblings who are sets of triplets.
NEWS
January 2, 1999
Did I miss something in article "Cardiac aid gets handyman fired" (Dec. 27)?As I understand the situation, Ted Robinson, a survivor of a heart attack, saved the life of Rochelle Wilkins and was fired for his efforts. Ms. Wilkins, also a heart attack survivor, whose supply of nitroglycerin was depleted, took one of Mr. Robinson's pills. This, according to medical personnel, possibly saved her life.The article noted that she and Mr. Robinson were acquaintances. They may have even shared knowledge of their similar conditions.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Jonathan Bor and Diana K. Sugg and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Worried by an explosion of multiple births that now includes the world's first set of surviving octuplets, physicians are calling for more careful use of fertility drugs.Doctors at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the country's leading group of fertility specialists, are working on guidelines to improve the monitoring of women on fertility drugs, provide more education for doctors and patients, and possibly regulate physicians to ensure they have the appropriate training.The guidelines would urge doctors to routinely take measures that would limit multiple pregnancies to triplets.
NEWS
By ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | November 20, 1998
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- The latest advance in the 20-year-old in-vitro fertilization field may also resolve one of its thorniest ethical issues: the transfer of too many fertilized eggs, resulting in potentially dangerous and expensive triplet, quadruplet and quintuplet births.In September, an Orange County, Calif., clinic became one of a handful in the country that began growing fertilized eggs in a special nutritional solution for two or three extra days -- long enough for an eight-celled embryo to grow into one with too many cells to count.
NEWS
By DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS and DAVID L. BECK AND JULIE SEVRENS LYONS,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
In what probably will be reassuring to many couples considering fertility treatments, new research suggests that babies conceived with a little help from science are no more likely to have birth defects or chromosomal abnormalities than babies made the old-fashioned way. But women who become pregnant through in vitro fertilization may experience more complications during their pregnancy, the scientists cautioned. Multiple births are also much more common - and represent the single greatest health risk to babies conceived in that manner.
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