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NEWS
June 7, 2013
In the wake of the recent death of a British soldier at the hands of extremists, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s commentary misappropriates the term "multiculturalism" and consequently muddles the discussion ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). Mr. Ehrlich argues that multiculturalism, which he sees as promoted by progressives, and which entails the maintenance of separate cultural enclaves that do not partake in American values, has no place in the United States, since it disrupts the image of the melting-pot that remains a powerful metaphor in our quasi-mythological self-conception.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
With "Save the Last Dance" and the shot-in-Baltimore "Step Up," Duane Adler established himself as one of the go-to screenwriters for 21st-century dance movies. But apparently that wasn't enough. "Make Your Move," a multicultural dance drama with tons of "Romeo and Juliet" undertones that opens in theaters today, marks Adler's debut as both screenwriter and director. Not that he didn't like what other directors had done with his earlier projects, he stresses. But this one was too much his baby to hand it over to anyone else.
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NEWS
July 27, 2011
Regarding the horror in Norway, I have no intention of "looking inward," as letter writer Steve Devon suggests ("Norway tragedy should make us look inward," July 26 ). The devastating murder and destruction in that country had nothing to do with a failure to recognize the "value in multiculturalism. " I personally don't see much value in "multiculturalism" myself, but it would never occur to me to bomb buildings or open fire on helpless victims. As for living in a country "founded on the principle of equality" and Constitutional redress, Mr. Devon has a poor grasp of American history.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In an effort to reach out to some of its "multicultural" riders -- namely those who identify as LGBT, black or Hispanic -- Amtrak has launched three new "microsites" where bloggers will be chronicling travel issues specifically relevant to those communities. The three sites launched earlier this month. For the bilingual Hispanic community, there is the translatable DescubreNorteAmerica.com ; for the black community, there is MyBlackJourney.com ; and for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, there is AmtrakRideWithPride.com . "While Amtrak's main website, Amtrak.com, is a travel-planning resource for all travelers, the microsites are culturally focused travel sites that host the unique, original multicultural voices of a rotating set of featured bloggers," Amtrak said in a statement.
EXPLORE
December 5, 2011
I concur with the general sentiment of Will Placek's letter, "Creeping Sharia is bound to choke off our freedoms. " Perhaps Sharia will not choke off all our freedoms, but most definitely our granddaughter's freedoms will be decreased. The more Sharia law, with its religiously prescribed second-class status and accompanying separateness, influences our society, the more future generations of women will gradually lose their hard-won feminist freedoms. This brings me to my question: When it comes to two pieties, worshipped in our modern society - feminism and multiculturalism - which one holds the trump card?
NEWS
September 13, 1993
It's unfortunate that Baltimore's latest experiment in multicultural education is being launched just as a similar program in neighboring Washington, D.C., has come under fire for lacking intellectual integrity. School board members there were outraged recently to discover that the consultant hired to develop the city's "Afrocentric" program had misled officials about her credentials and methods.Baltimore has managed to avoid such controversy for the most part. Its multicultural program was designed as an integral part of a much larger overhaul of the school curriculum, and the increased attention given to the contributions of minorities grew out of recommendations developed by a carefully selected task force of scholars, school administrators and community leaders.
NEWS
May 22, 1992
The Baltimore City schools are considering how to put in place a new curriculum that stresses the contributions made by people of color, an area traditional schooling has ignored. The move toward "multicultural" or "Afrocentric" schooling can be a positive development if it helps motivate students who are alienated from the educational system. But it is no panacea.The present school curriculum is outdated in more ways than just how it deals with minorities. The last comprehensive overhaul occurred more than 20 years ago. The world has changed quite a bit since then; there have been scientific discoveries, political upheavals, cultural transformations.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
TOMORROW'S grand opening of the Patterson as a $4.5 million arts center underscores that Highlandtown's future lies in an even more active pursuit of multiculturalism. That's the key to regenerating the area's rowhouse streets and aging population. The Creative Alliance, the one-time movie theater's steward, is good at promoting such diversity. In eight years of a vagabond existence that started in Fells Point, the arts organization has steadily offered an exciting mix of offbeat programming and in the process developed quite a following.
NEWS
By Herbert London | February 22, 2007
In 1966, Australia's trade with Japan exceeded its trade with the United States and with Britain. At that moment, it became increasing difficult for Australia to maintain the exclusionary "White Australia" policy. That, of course, didn't stop Australian officials from trying. In fact, the Japanese at first were considered "Caucasian" under immigration provisions. But that stance was obviously unsustainable. Gradually and incrementally, the policy was revised to treat Asians as equals with Europeans.
NEWS
By Robert Holland | October 30, 2007
When he was governor of Maryland in 2004, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. stirred a hornet's nest when he denounced multiculturalism as "bunk" on a talk-radio show. Because many Americans believe multiculturalism merely means teaching children in a wholesome way about diverse cultures, Mr. Ehrlich drew heat. Now, the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME), the main advocacy organization for multiculturalism, is coming to Baltimore to hold its 17th annual national convention tomorrow through Sunday.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The recent article on multiculturalism by Bob Ehrlich ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2) and the response by Wally Pinkard ("America is more than baseball and apple pie," June 7) have opened up a credible discussion on the root causes of political philosophy. I applaud The Sun for offering this polemic for readers to digest and learn from. The advantages of immigration and multiculturalism to the world and the U.S. are so obvious that they do not need discussion. The root cause of the multiculturalism debate is religious secularism and intolerance.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
I am impressed by letter writer Doug Bafford's well-presented, sympathetic point of view on the subject of multiculturalism in the United States ("Multiculturalism is not the enemy of democracy," June 7). However, the fact is that the problems with multiculturalism are hardening in the U.S. - especially when those problems have been accepted wholesale by the more liberal among us. The maintenance of separate cultural enclaves has become a threat to our country in a way that it never was before.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
In the wake of the recent death of a British soldier at the hands of extremists, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s commentary misappropriates the term "multiculturalism" and consequently muddles the discussion ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2). Mr. Ehrlich argues that multiculturalism, which he sees as promoted by progressives, and which entails the maintenance of separate cultural enclaves that do not partake in American values, has no place in the United States, since it disrupts the image of the melting-pot that remains a powerful metaphor in our quasi-mythological self-conception.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2013
Taiye Selasi's debut novel has been in publication for less than a week. But even before a single copy was sold, the glamorous 33-year-old was being hailed as the newest star of the literary world. Selasi's publisher, The Penguin Group, is promoting "Ghana Must Go" big-time. Penguin describes the family saga as "one of the most eagerly anticipated debut novels of the year. " Because of her book's multicultural tapestry, Selasi has been compared to such literary It Girls as Zadie Smith and Jhumpa Lahiri.
NEWS
December 10, 2012
Washington ZooLights Spend the holidays with some furry creatures and scaly critters at ZooLights, which features animal sculptures composed of environmentally friendly lights. Animal houses will stay open during this seasonal event, and gingerbread habitats will also be on display. The creations will be on display at the National Zoo from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Dec. 14-23, 26-30 and New Year's Day. The zoo will be closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year's Eve. For more information, call 202-633-2614 or go to nationalzoo.si.edu.
EXPLORE
December 5, 2011
I concur with the general sentiment of Will Placek's letter, "Creeping Sharia is bound to choke off our freedoms. " Perhaps Sharia will not choke off all our freedoms, but most definitely our granddaughter's freedoms will be decreased. The more Sharia law, with its religiously prescribed second-class status and accompanying separateness, influences our society, the more future generations of women will gradually lose their hard-won feminist freedoms. This brings me to my question: When it comes to two pieties, worshipped in our modern society - feminism and multiculturalism - which one holds the trump card?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 5, 1997
The extraordinary event happened in a classroom at one of those much maligned Baltimore City public schools. In the first semester of the 1996-1997 school year, Lamar Shields' Spanish class wrote a children's book with a multicultural theme.On Monday, most of that class came on their own time - some even gave up lunch - to discuss the book, "The First Day of School." The 26 Baltimore City College students wrote the story themselves. Rodney Kitchen and Sean Dorsey handled the color illustrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
On a corner in Little Italy sits Pacific Coast Dining Company, a restaurant trying to bring multicultural cuisine to the heart of red sauce country. And aside from a few inventory issues on a recent trip there, it succeeds. From its name, you might think Pacific Coast Dining Company sells cooking supplies. It's actually a romantic, modern-looking restaurant, with blue walls and azure accents in the bar and dining areas. We were seated next to a windowed wall with a people-watching view of Eastern Avenue.
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