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Multicultural Education

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By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
The county school system is expected to reveal a plan at the Board of Education meeting tomorrow night for incorporating multicultural education in all subject areas.Each county must submit such a plan to the state education department by Sept. 1, said Margaret Trader, assistant superintendent for instructional and staff development. "Multicultural education asks us to look at the larger world," Ms. Trader said. "It's more than just ethnicity and race."Agnes Purnell, who was asked to leave her position as principal of Havre de Grace Middle School this year to develop Harford's multicultural education plan, will present it to the board.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
The pairs faced each other, with clipboards and pens in hand, ready for the first round. They would have minutes to quiz each other and jot down notes, before moving on to the next person. Who are you? What organization do you represent? Whom do you serve? Ready. Set. Go. Representatives from a mix of agencies, organizations and programs were on a mission to get to know each other. The hodgepodge of individuals who usually spend their days helping Carroll County residents in such areas as literacy, violence prevention, employment or education were getting some help of their own last week, and discovering the resources that might assist them in their jobs, and thus in better serving the community.
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | December 25, 1994
The Harford County Board of Education is developing a new five-year plan to integrate multicultural education into county classrooms.The board received a briefing Monday night from the Harford County Multicultural Task Force outlining an initial draft.The 30-member task force, appointed in August, will conduct surveys next spring to develop ideas on how to implement the plan, said Christina Reynolds, task force chairman. The plan is to be completed by September."This is not a new issue and we're really not changing a whole lot," said Mrs. Reynolds, county schools supervisor of human relations and staff development.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Some say she started a movement of multicultural education in Carroll County, but for Aurora M. Pagulayan her work has been more of a mission. A native of the Philippines, Pagulayan came to the United States in 1967 to earn her master's degree in education at Bucknell University. The next year, she began teaching fourth grade in Carroll at Charles Carroll Elementary in Union Mills. "You can imagine the cultural shock for an educator coming from a place where teachers are revered to a very permissive society where students talk to adults with more freedom and ease," said Pagulayan, 61, who taught for two years at a school in the Philippines before coming to the United States.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1994
Public schools cannot pay lip service to multicultural education these days, an authority on the subject told a group of Maryland educators yesterday.Dr. Geneva Gay, professor of education at the University of Washington, who has extensive experience teaching and writing about cultural diversity in schools, said that improving the teaching of varied cultures is a necessity in America these days, not a choice. No one can escape ethnic diversity, she said during the first in what is expected to become an annual meeting of state educators on multiculturalism.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1995
Multicultural education, the efficient management of school buildings and the direction of the school system's technology programs top the agenda tomorrow, when the Harford County Board of Education holds its only full meeting of the month.The board, which meets at 7 p.m. in the ground-floor lecture hall at Southampton Middle School, is expected to vote on whether to implement a state-mandated plan for incorporating the contributions of various cultural groups into the curriculum and teacher training.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
Harford County's school board is considering a multicultural education plan that includes more than just racial and ethnic groups.A disabled student, for example, could see other disabled people in a social studies textbook. An African-American student would learn about the contributions African-Americans have made to scientific fields. And teachers would learn how to teach children from various backgrounds, despite their different learning styles.These measures and others should help close the gaps in the academic performance of different groups of students.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
Dena L. Randolph, a director of multicultural education and co-director of the Minnesota Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity project, died unexpectedly June 6 after returning to her Minneapolis home from a business trip. The former Baltimorean was 36.In 1992, she had moved from New York City to Minneapolis, where she taught sixth-grade and eighth-grade history and English at the Breck School.She also directed the private school's efforts to diversify its curriculum as well as to begin the state's first SEED program, which replicated a national project.
NEWS
By Cynthia Kammann and Cynthia Kammann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 1998
ONCE A month, the Citizen Advisory Committee to the Anne Arundel County Board of Education holds a countywide meeting at the county school board building on Riva Road. Multicultural education, the county executive's committee on school construction and repair and the development of a survey to measure parent satisfaction with county schools were discussed at the last meeting. Here are some of the highlights:Multicultural educationThe Maryland State Department of Education has described curriculum, instruction, climate and staff development as the four areas of each school's five-year plan in which multicultural education must be included.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | June 11, 2006
Some say she started a movement of multicultural education in Carroll County, but for Aurora M. Pagulayan her work has been more of a mission. A native of the Philippines, Pagulayan came to the United States in 1967 to earn her master's degree in education at Bucknell University. The next year, she began teaching fourth grade in Carroll at Charles Carroll Elementary in Union Mills. "You can imagine the cultural shock for an educator coming from a place where teachers are revered to a very permissive society where students talk to adults with more freedom and ease," said Pagulayan, 61, who taught for two years at a school in the Philippines before coming to the United States.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
Multicultural group to hold conference About 450 educators, community members and students from around the state are expected to attend the spring conference of the Maryland Multicultural Coalition, being held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The coalition, a state chapter of the National Association for Multicultural Education, and the Howard County school system are hosts. The conference will be held at Reservoir High School in Fulton. Its theme is "Cultural Proficiency: Knowing the Learner."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 13, 2004
THERE is no such thing as a multicultural society that can sustain itself, in my view, and I think history teaches us this lesson." Thus spake the lettered historian, Robert Ehrlich, in his denunciation of what angry white males like to dress up as a profound threat to the American way of life and our precious bodily fluids -- multiculturalism. The governor of Maryland called it "crap" and "bunk," getting down with his right-wing pals on the radio show of a man who a few years ago referred to Hispanic immigrants as "wetbacks" and refused to apologize for it. It's a great country, no?
NEWS
By Christopher Jack Hill and Christopher Jack Hill,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
When the moving truck showed up at Crofton Woods Elementary School on a recent weekday, students rushed toward it with boxes in hand. "I feel like I made someone feel special," said Sarah Gentry, a pupil at the school who was one of many students, parents and administrators who helped assemble more than 100 boxes of books, papers, pens and other materials for pupils at a school in Kituiu, Kenya. Pupils donated allowances and school supplies from home, and raised money through events such as a concert.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2000
A Baltimore County educator who rejected an offer last year to direct the school system's efforts to boost minority achievement has agreed to take the job amid continuing concerns that the gap between black and white students remains too wide. Barbara S. J. Dezmon took over the school system's Office of Equity and Assurance -- formerly the Office of Minority Achievement and Multicultural Education -- yesterday, a day after school board members approved her appointment without comment. James H. Wilson, who had held the job, was moved into Dezmon's old post -- assistant to the deputy superintendent.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
A little girl runs down the street, her socks melting into folds around her ankles. A mother gazes tenderly at the newborn baby cradled in her arms. As a boy lies dreaming, a smile drifts across his lips. These images of African-Americans in children's books serve an important purpose, say award-winning illustrators who visited Baltimore last week as part of a Black History Month program sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library. "Children read what they're drawn to, what they're excited about," said Jan Spivey Gilchrist, a black painter from Chicago who has illustrated "Night on Neighborhood Street," "Jump Back, Honey," and more than 40 other children's books since 1988.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
James H. Wilson -- Baltimore County schools' latest booster for minority achievement and multicultural education -- demands respect. If you give him a little, he'll return it to you, twofold.It's a management philosophy that served Wilson well during his four-year tenure as principal at Woodlawn High School, where he improved the academic achievements of a large student body that is 90 percent black, and where he improved the school's image in the community's eyes."If you build a respectful relationship with every child in a school building, and if you are positive and set goals for those children, then they will perform," said Wilson, who took over in September as assistant to the superintendent for minority achievement and multicultural education.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Severn School junior wins $1,000 scholarship A Millersville high school junior has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship for her work in a national epidemiology competition. Pooja Singal, a student at the Severn School in Severna Park, was named a semifinalist in the Young Epidemiology Scholars competition. The contest is sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and administered by the College Board. Its goal is to encourage interest in the study of disease. Pooja received the honor for her project titled "Do Flu Shots Really Cause Flu?"
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