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NEWS
February 26, 1993
Brian Mulroney fell from power in Canada after doing everything right. Deeply unpopular, he resigned as Conservative Party leader so his successor can run for prime minister as the incumbent this fall. Mr. Mulroney has been an anchor around his party's neck. Perhaps the successor can wring victory from certain defeat.What Mr. Mulroney did right was cut spending and increase revenue through an unpopular sales tax to reduce the deficit, lower import barriers to spur trade, deregulate much of the economy and hold down inflation.
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NEWS
By DAVID BEERS | October 20, 1993
Vancouver.--She wants to be Canada's new leader for the new age. And why not? She's a she. She's smart. She is, all agree, ''interesting.'' And she all but admits that politicians are useless against the global economy.She is Kim Campbell who, in a bold gambit to hang onto her brief prime-ministership, campaigns on this prediction: Under her leadership Canada's 11 percent-plus unemployment rate will not drop much until at least the year 2000. People want the truth, she shrugs. When Ms. Campbell speaks her truths, hope gets downsized.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 14, 1991
OTTAWA -- Brian Mulroney admits he is jealous of George Bush's sensational ratings in the popularity polls.Canada's role in the Persian Gulf war has not brought the political benefits to its prime minister that President Bush has enjoyed in the United States.In fact, polls here show that Mr. Mulroney, dragged down by the constitutional crisis over the separatist drive in Quebec, still draws numbers nearly opposite that of Mr. Bush -- in the teens compared to the president's whopping 91 percent in some polls.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews,Staff Writers The New York Times contributed to this article | April 4, 1993
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- President Clinton an Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began their summit here yesterday, immediately tackling the two momentous issues they face: how much western investment in Russia is prudent, and how Mr. Yeltsin will gain enough control over the Russian economy so that the West can fulfill its promises of financial help.Even before Mr. Clinton landed from Portland, Ore., the agenda was spelled out in a brief news conference featuring Mr. Yeltsin and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, who praised Mr. Yeltsin for all he has done so far."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1993
TORONTO -- Kim Campbell, 45, a former lawyer fro Vancouver who is now defense minister, has emerged as an early favorite in the contest to succeed Brian Mulroney as Conservative Party leader and prime minister.Not only do many political analysts and polls suggest that she is the one to beat in June, when the Conservatives hold their first convention to pick a leader, but the front-running Liberals have also begun challenging her in the House of Commons.On Thursday, just a day after Mr. Mulroney announced he would step down, Liberal Party lawmakers barraged Ms. Campbell with questions about a government decision to spend $5.8 billion on 50 new Navy EH-101 helicopters while it was cutting back on foreign aid and on regional subsidies.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has told Johns Hopkins University graduates that the Western world's response to the end of the Cold War has been "hesitant and timid and out of scale with both the need and the opportunity."Taking time out yesterday from talks in Washington to deliver the commencement address at the Hopkins Homewood campus, the Canadian leader said, "It is important that there be no withdrawal of American leadership."Leadership will cost money," he said. "But the Marshall Plan cost much more money than has been transferred to the former Soviet Union so far, and the Marshall Plan has repaid to the American people and to democracies everywhere its investment a thousand times over.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews and Carl M. Cannon and Mark Matthews,Staff Writers The New York Times contributed to this article | April 4, 1993
VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- President Clinton an Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin began their summit here yesterday, immediately tackling the two momentous issues they face: how much western investment in Russia is prudent, and how Mr. Yeltsin will gain enough control over the Russian economy so that the West can fulfill its promises of financial help.Even before Mr. Clinton landed from Portland, Ore., the agenda was spelled out in a brief news conference featuring Mr. Yeltsin and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, who praised Mr. Yeltsin for all he has done so far."
NEWS
May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's complaint that his nation is being "harassed" by punitive U.S. trade restrictions is more than the cry of a politician in trouble. It reflects the widespread feeling on the part of our northern neighbor that Americans are dealing from a stacked deck in the way they go about implementing the three-year-old U.S.-Canadian free trade agreement. This is an issue that dominates political discussion in Canada and is virtually ignored in this country.Specifically at issue are barriers Washington recently imposed on imports of Canadian soft-wood products because of allegedly unfair government subsidies and on Hondas because they allegedly do not have sufficient North American content.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenste and Myron Beckenste,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney told Johns Hopkins University graduates yesterday that the Western world's response to the end of the Cold War has been "hesitant and timid and out of scale with both the need and the opportunity."Taking time out from talks in Washington to deliver the commencement address at the Hopkins Homewood campus, the Canadian leader said, "It is important that there be no withdrawal of American leadership."Leadership will cost money," he said. "But the Marshall Plan [after World War II]
NEWS
March 12, 1992
Mulroney still mad about mock adMonths later, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney is still enraged about a mock magazine ad starring his teen-age daughter. "If you ask me whether I lost my temper, you're bloody right I lost my temper," Mr. Mulroney said on a CBC-TV interview recently. "If I had that little guy within striking distance, I'd like to choke him . . ."The ad in the September issue of Frank touted a contest to deflower the prime minister's daughter, Caroline, 17. A Frank spokesman said the ad's point was to needle Mr. Mulroney for marching out his attractive daughter last summer after polls showed his popularity slumping.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 28, 1993
TORONTO -- Kim Campbell, 45, a former lawyer fro Vancouver who is now defense minister, has emerged as an early favorite in the contest to succeed Brian Mulroney as Conservative Party leader and prime minister.Not only do many political analysts and polls suggest that she is the one to beat in June, when the Conservatives hold their first convention to pick a leader, but the front-running Liberals have also begun challenging her in the House of Commons.On Thursday, just a day after Mr. Mulroney announced he would step down, Liberal Party lawmakers barraged Ms. Campbell with questions about a government decision to spend $5.8 billion on 50 new Navy EH-101 helicopters while it was cutting back on foreign aid and on regional subsidies.
NEWS
February 26, 1993
Brian Mulroney fell from power in Canada after doing everything right. Deeply unpopular, he resigned as Conservative Party leader so his successor can run for prime minister as the incumbent this fall. Mr. Mulroney has been an anchor around his party's neck. Perhaps the successor can wring victory from certain defeat.What Mr. Mulroney did right was cut spending and increase revenue through an unpopular sales tax to reduce the deficit, lower import barriers to spur trade, deregulate much of the economy and hold down inflation.
NEWS
May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's complaint that his nation is being "harassed" by punitive U.S. trade restrictions is more than the cry of a politician in trouble. It reflects the widespread feeling on the part of our northern neighbor that Americans are dealing from a stacked deck in the way they go about implementing the three-year-old U.S.-Canadian free trade agreement. This is an issue that dominates political discussion in Canada and is virtually ignored in this country.Specifically at issue are barriers Washington recently imposed on imports of Canadian soft-wood products because of allegedly unfair government subsidies and on Hondas because they allegedly do not have sufficient North American content.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenste and Myron Beckenste,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney told Johns Hopkins University graduates yesterday that the Western world's response to the end of the Cold War has been "hesitant and timid and out of scale with both the need and the opportunity."Taking time out from talks in Washington to deliver the commencement address at the Hopkins Homewood campus, the Canadian leader said, "It is important that there be no withdrawal of American leadership."Leadership will cost money," he said. "But the Marshall Plan [after World War II]
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein and Myron Beckenstein,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney has told Johns Hopkins University graduates that the Western world's response to the end of the Cold War has been "hesitant and timid and out of scale with both the need and the opportunity."Taking time out yesterday from talks in Washington to deliver the commencement address at the Hopkins Homewood campus, the Canadian leader said, "It is important that there be no withdrawal of American leadership."Leadership will cost money," he said. "But the Marshall Plan cost much more money than has been transferred to the former Soviet Union so far, and the Marshall Plan has repaid to the American people and to democracies everywhere its investment a thousand times over.
NEWS
March 12, 1992
Mulroney still mad about mock adMonths later, Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney is still enraged about a mock magazine ad starring his teen-age daughter. "If you ask me whether I lost my temper, you're bloody right I lost my temper," Mr. Mulroney said on a CBC-TV interview recently. "If I had that little guy within striking distance, I'd like to choke him . . ."The ad in the September issue of Frank touted a contest to deflower the prime minister's daughter, Caroline, 17. A Frank spokesman said the ad's point was to needle Mr. Mulroney for marching out his attractive daughter last summer after polls showed his popularity slumping.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | January 6, 1991
If 1990 was a bitter year for Canada, 1991 promises to be an ugly one. Canada's traditional lack of a strong national identity has come home to haunt the country with a vengeance.For Quebecers, especially, provincial loyalty far outweighs any they may feel toward the country as a whole. Now they are feeling their provincial oats and are in a constant state of demand and threat. Much of the rest of the country is tired of the Quebec posture and is mumbling, "Go already." But having Quebec break from confederation is not a solution, but a source of worse problems.
NEWS
By DAVID BEERS | October 20, 1993
Vancouver.--She wants to be Canada's new leader for the new age. And why not? She's a she. She's smart. She is, all agree, ''interesting.'' And she all but admits that politicians are useless against the global economy.She is Kim Campbell who, in a bold gambit to hang onto her brief prime-ministership, campaigns on this prediction: Under her leadership Canada's 11 percent-plus unemployment rate will not drop much until at least the year 2000. People want the truth, she shrugs. When Ms. Campbell speaks her truths, hope gets downsized.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 14, 1991
OTTAWA -- Brian Mulroney admits he is jealous of George Bush's sensational ratings in the popularity polls.Canada's role in the Persian Gulf war has not brought the political benefits to its prime minister that President Bush has enjoyed in the United States.In fact, polls here show that Mr. Mulroney, dragged down by the constitutional crisis over the separatist drive in Quebec, still draws numbers nearly opposite that of Mr. Bush -- in the teens compared to the president's whopping 91 percent in some polls.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | January 6, 1991
If 1990 was a bitter year for Canada, 1991 promises to be an ugly one. Canada's traditional lack of a strong national identity has come home to haunt the country with a vengeance.For Quebecers, especially, provincial loyalty far outweighs any they may feel toward the country as a whole. Now they are feeling their provincial oats and are in a constant state of demand and threat. Much of the rest of the country is tired of the Quebec posture and is mumbling, "Go already." But having Quebec break from confederation is not a solution, but a source of worse problems.
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