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NEWS
March 25, 2005
On March 23, 2005, PAUL BOYD MULES, JR., beloved husband of Marie Schisler Mules; dear father of Marie "Maggie" Mules Herman and Jene "Missy" Mules Herbert; dear grandfather of Bridger G. Herman and Emilee M. and Samantha M. Herbert; devoted brother of Mary M. Nielsen, Jene M. Harner and William C. Mules. Friends may call a the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Friday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, 10 A.M. at the funeral home.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Forget what you think you know about a mule being an obstinate creature, given to sitting down with a frustrated rider on its back if the impulse strikes. Madison and Miranda Iager of Woodbine say they will be working to debunk the "stubborn as a mule" myth when they compete Thursday on Gato and Misdemeanor at the Howard County Fair in the Maryland High School Rodeo Association's first appearance since forming in November. "Gato is super funny, always trying to make you laugh," said Madison, 15. "And he's very, very personable.
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NEWS
March 25, 2005
Paul B. Mules, a retired paper salesman, died of complications of Parkinson's disease Wednesday at Edenwald in Towson, where he had resided for less than year. He was 78. Born, raised and a longtime resident of Stoneleigh, he was a 1945 McDonogh School graduate. He earned a business degree and attended law school at the University of Baltimore. Mr. Mules served three weeks in the Navy in 1945, and in 1948 was recalled for a three-year stint in the Army. He became a salesman for Borden's ice cream, and later joined Baltimore-Warner Paper Co. on South Street.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
If there was a lesson to be learned at the mule pull and mule jump at the Howard County Fair, it was this: If a mule doesn't want to do something, it won't. In the dusty ring Saturday morning, farmers called mules, cajoled them and even tried to dizzy them by leading them in circles. Some farmers jumped up in the air to encourage the beasts to leap over a plastic bar; the mules paid them no mind. "Mules are a lot different than horses," said Mary Streaker, who, along with her husband, Howard, organized the mule pull at the fair for the past five years.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
MuhlenbergMulesCoach: Fran Meagher, seventh yearAssistant coaches: Tom Doddy, Stan Luckenbill, Chris Peischl, Scott CoopermanLast year's record: 2-8-0, 1-6-0 in the Centennial Football ConferenceTop returnees: Seniors, fullback Steve Turi, wide receiver Eric Slaton, tight end Ron Ondrejca, free safety Clarke Paulus; juniors, linebacker Craig Stump, defensive lineman Jim Cohen, punter Gerry ScottTop newcomers: "We never go into a season expecting much from...
NEWS
November 17, 1991
Coach: Dave Medeira, fifth yearAssistant coaches: Patrick Broggan, Dave Lutz, Scott McClaryLast year's record: 12-13 overall, 6-6 in the Middle Atlantic Conference-Southwest DivisionTop returnees: Senior -- forward Jim Hitchcock; junior -- guard Pat Boyle; sophomores -- forwards Joe Yahner, Jim Starr, Matt Kelly, Adam Hakki and Dennis Adams, guard Tom McDonnellTop newcomers: Freshman -- guard Ernie KoschinegCoach's comments: "It's a question-mark year for...
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 3, 1994
On the street, they're known as "mules," or "body packers," or, in some places, "higher angels." Officially, they're known as "alimentary canal drug smugglers." They're also known as stupid. And sometimes they're known as dead. They are the men and sometimes women who transport heroin into the United States by swallowing small balloons or capsules filled with the drug. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.About a year ago, a 43-year-old man from Nigeria collapsed and died in South Baltimore, and the autopsy showed a large amount of high-grade heroin packed inside 38 small cylindrical capsules inside his stomach and intestine.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1998
Wayne J. Mules, a popular pianist at Phillips Harborplace restaurant since it opened 17 years ago, died of a heart attack Friday at his East Baltimore home. He was 59.Mr. Mules was known for his barrelhouse and honky-tonk stylings that often got customers singing.At Phillips, he wore a white shirt, red vest and sometimes a red sleeve garter.Mr. Mules often kept a burning cigarette and a vodka and orange juice sitting on the edge of the piano. His signature song was "I'll Be Seeing You.""He was a mainstay there and it wasn't uncommon to find people standing four or five deep around his piano," said Jay Wachter, director of musical entertainment for Phillips and president of Entertainment Consultants, who hired him."
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
Forget what you think you know about a mule being an obstinate creature, given to sitting down with a frustrated rider on its back if the impulse strikes. Madison and Miranda Iager of Woodbine say they will be working to debunk the "stubborn as a mule" myth when they compete Thursday on Gato and Misdemeanor at the Howard County Fair in the Maryland High School Rodeo Association's first appearance since forming in November. "Gato is super funny, always trying to make you laugh," said Madison, 15. "And he's very, very personable.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 1, 1998
A ruinous drought that saw host Johns Hopkins score just seven points over a 10-minute stretch late in the game led to Muhlenberg taking the Centennial Conference tournament title for the second time in four years last night, 55-53.As tough a time as the Blue Jays (20-6) were having scoring, Muhlenberg wasn't pulling away so rugged and unyielding were the defenses of both teams.Hopkins evidenced its first dry period of the night midway in the first half and, after seeming in control with a 24-17 lead, the Mules had hit a couple of three-pointers and the Jays were down, 31-27.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
I believe it was Edgar Allan Poe who once mused, "The happiest day -- the happiest hour/ My sear'd and blighted heart hath known … is sipping liquor from a copper mug. " All right, maybe I'm winging it there just a little, but that line is the inspiration behind a quiet little bar that opened up inside the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront a few months ago: Apropoe's. Could there be a more aptly named tribute to our adopted son than that? Witty, they certainly are. But what really sets this hotel bar apart is the quality of ingredients and the nice selection of craft cocktails on menu.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
At some point after it opened in the fall of 2012, Harbor East's Fleet Street Kitchen realized its necktie was pulled a bit too tight. The stylish farm-to-table restaurant with the four-course tasting menu had earned a flattering reputation for its food, but it was not a place to stop in on a whim for a drink. Enter The Tavern Room, the more casual side of Fleet Street Kitchen that debuted at the beginning of this month. Instead of completely breaking down the sophisticated environment they had cultivated, owners the Bagby Restaurant Group split the room in half, leaving the upper dining room the same, while attempting to make the front area more approachable.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | March 10, 2014
Attackman Bubba Johnson put the visiting Mountaineers on the board first, but the Jaspers (1-5) scored four straight goals in the second quarter and held on to defeat Mount St. Mary's (0-6), 8-7. Attackman Patrick Hodapp, who led all players with four goals, had a hat trick during Manhattan's run.The Mountaineers held the Jaspers scoreless for the final 20:53 and closed their deficit to one but could not complete the comeback. It was the Mount's closest defeat this season. St. Mary's 18, Muhlenberg 6 : Senior midfielder Ben Love (McDonogh)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Football coaches love to talk about the importance of all three phases of the game, but special teams often sounds like lip service. When Muhlenberg is involved in the conversation, special teams is a relevant topic. Since 1999, the Mules have scored 25 touchdowns on special teams. In last Saturday's 58-0 demolition of McDaniel, Muhlenberg blocked a 37-yard field-goal attempt and returned it 72 yards for a score and blocked a punt that the offense turned into a touchdown. That aspect of the Mules (2-1 overall and 1-1 in the Centennial Conference)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | October 30, 2012
The folks at Gordon Biersch Brewery have a passion. Surprisingly, despite the name, it's not just for beer (though their German lagers will keep aficionados busy). Instead, their brand is defined by craft: From brew to food to cocktail and anywhere in between, the newly opened Harbor East restaurant believes in made-from-scratch, small-batch meals and beverages that customers can get excited about. Though handcrafted beer is their first love, Gordon Biersch brewery aims to "up the ante" with their drink program as well, elevating it to craft-level by infusing quality brands, fresh flavors, and sustainable products into their cocktails.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
The jam scene is full of long shows, special guests and perpetually touring bands. But few players have been in as many bands and stayed on the road as much as Warren Haynes. Often seen as the hardest-working man in one of the most musically and physically demanding genres, Haynes always seems to be on the road with one group or the next. "The past 10 years have been really busy," Haynes said. That's one way to put it. Haynes is everywhere — a member of the Southern rock staples the Allman Brothers Band and legendary jammers the Dead, and the front man of blues rock group Gov't Mule, which headlines Artscape Saturday.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Mules may be known for their stubbornness, but Brice Ridgely's two mules, Abe and Charlie, proved to be excellent sports this week at the Howard County Fair. The team, from Cooksville, dragged more than a ton more than 10 feet Tuesday in a steady drizzle. The rain put a damper on the Howard County Fair's first mule-pulling contest - Ridgley's team was the only one that made it to the fairgrounds out of six that were expected. But more than 60 spectators applauded a demonstration of the animals' strength.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Football coaches love to talk about the importance of all three phases of the game, but special teams often sounds like lip service. When Muhlenberg is involved in the conversation, special teams is a relevant topic. Since 1999, the Mules have scored 25 touchdowns on special teams. In last Saturday's 58-0 demolition of McDaniel, Muhlenberg blocked a 37-yard field-goal attempt and returned it 72 yards for a score and blocked a punt that the offense turned into a touchdown. That aspect of the Mules (2-1 overall and 1-1 in the Centennial Conference)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Jam rock band Gov't Mule, neo soul singer Musiq Soulchild and Washington-based rapper Wale will headline this year's Artscape festival, according to organizers. The full lineup for the three-day celebration of visual arts and music, which will be announced at a news conference today, also features indie rockers Cold War Kids, soul singer Maysa, singer/songwriter Jackie Greene and reggae group Rebelution, among others. This year's roster could appeal to a younger audience than festivals from years past, which typically feature several vintage acts.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2010
Noah's Compass, by Anne Tyler. Alfred A. Knopf. $25.95 "You're the only Baltimorean I know who leaves his front door unlocked," Liam Pennywell's ex-wife tells him. "Even though you've had a burglary. But then any time someone walks in you complain that they're intruding. ... Here's solitary sad old Liam, only God help anybody who steps in and tries to get close." The main character in Anne Tyler's 18th novel, Liam sometimes senses that his life is "drying up and hardening, like one of those mouse carcasses you find beneath a radiator."
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