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NEWS
November 6, 2007
On November 5, 2007, ROBEST M. MUHAMMAD, devoted wife of Wali Muhammad. The family will receive friends on Thursday at Masjid Ul Haqq, 514 Islamic Way at 11 A.M. follow by services at 12:15 P.M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
A Baltimore man died after being handcuffed and collapsing during a traffic stop on Route 1 in Elkridge, Howard County Police said Saturday. An officer stopped Hakeem Muhammad, 51, about 9:15 a.m. as he was driving south on Route 1 near the exit to Route 100 and determined that he had suspended tags and lied about his identity, according to police. After the officer arrested Muhammad and handcuffed him, he complained that he did not feel well and collapsed, police said. The officer and paramedics both did CPR on Muhammad, and he was taken to Howard County General Hospital where he was pronounced dead, according to police.
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NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | June 13, 1994
IT'S HARD not to listen when the Rev. Dr. Khalid Abdul Muhammad speaks. He is a master rhetorician -- more provocative than Louis Farrakhan, as charismatic as Martin Luther King, as mesmerizing as Uncle Remus -- an altogether fascinating study in the sheer power of words well spoken.Not only does Khalid Muhammad revel in his right to preach violence, even as he is victimized by it, but he fervently believes in what he has to say. Such as that Jews dominated the African-American slave trade and continue to be the primary oppressors of black people.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 10, 2012
The Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation will honor Muhammad Ali and Under Armour at its annual Aspire Gala on Feb. 22, 2013 at the Waterfront Marriott, the group announced Monday. Ali and his wife, Lonnie, will be presented with the Aspire Award. Founder and CEO Kevin Plank will accept the same award on behalf of Under Armour. Robbie Callaway, former chairman of the Ripken board, will receive the Cal Sr. Award. All are being honored for their dedication to community service. Ali's humanitarian efforts are -- or should be -- well known to just about every sports fan. A news release from the foundation lauds his and Lonnie's work with soup kitchens, hospitals, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Special Olympics.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | September 21, 2001
CARDINAL Gibbons running back Hassan Muhammad II should be concerned about pimples, dates and coming opponents, but instead he and his family have been educators and teachers about their Muslim faith during the past 10 days. Ever since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, the Muhammads have been a little cautious. Nothing serious. Shortly after the tragedy, Muslimah Muhammad, 14, was requested to report to an administration office in an Anne Arundel County high school. "They went to my daughter and told her that if you have any problems with the tragedy that happened or if anybody approaches you, threatens you, bothers you, whatever, then you are to report to this particular person and we'll deal with the situation," said Hassan Muhammad I, an assistant football coach at Gibbons.
NEWS
January 10, 2004
A Virginia judge yesterday postponed the formal sentencing of convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad from Feb. 12 to March 10, the same day teen-age sniper Lee Boyd Malvo will be sentenced. A jury recommended in November that Muhammad be put to death for masterminding the sniper rampage that left 10 dead and three wounded in the Washington region in the fall of 2002. Muhammad's final sentence will be set by Judge LeRoy F. Millette Jr., who has the option of reducing the sentence to life in prison.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | June 27, 1994
CLIFFSIDE, N.J. -- On the road, Khalid Abdul Muhammad preaches hate against whites and Jews -- his self-sworn "enemies."But when he goes home, Mr. Muhammad sleeps with the enemy.The former Nation of Islam spokesman, a self-proclaimed black nationalist, apparently lives in a virtually all-white enclave, Cliffside, N.J., in a luxury co-op.At the Briarcliff, where the going rate for an apartment ranges from $995 to $2,000 a month, Mr. Muhammad enjoys the good life.There are doormen, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, tennis courts, a health club, and a lavish lobby filled with leather sofas, mirrors and gold trimming.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1994
TRENTON, N.J. -- A Nation of Islam minister who is at the center of a firestorm over hate speech will not be barred from a special viewing of the movie "Schindler's List" on Monday if he shows up, a spokesman for Gov. Christine Todd Whitman said yesterday.The minister, Khallid Abdul Muhammad, could also take part in a panel discussion on racism and bias before the showing, said the spokesman, Carl Golden.The governor has organized the event in Menlo Park as a rebuttal to Mr. Muhammad's scheduled speech that evening at Trenton State College.
NEWS
By ANDREA SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER and ANDREA SIEGEL AND JULIE SCHARPER,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Sporting a new close-cropped haircut in his last court appearance before his six-count murder trial starts here Monday, convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad asked a Montgomery County judge yesterday first to delay, then to move, the trial. "I don't believe I can get a fair trial here, based on the media attention," Muhammad told Judge James L. Ryan. However, Ryan denied both requests, saying he felt it would be possible to find "fair and impartial" jurors in the large county.
NEWS
February 2, 2006
PARIS -- French and German newspapers republished caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad yesterday in what they called a defense of freedom of expression, sparking fresh anger among Muslims. The drawings have divided opinion within Europe and the Middle East since a Danish newspaper first printed them in September. Islamic tradition bars any depiction of the prophet to prevent idolatry. The cartoons include an image of Muhammad wearing a turban shaped as a bomb and another portraying him holding a sword.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
A day after the Ravens were visited by boxing legend Muhammad Ali at their practice facility in Owings Mills, they hosted another one of the greatest athletes in modern history at Monday night's season opener at M&T Bank Stadium. Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps stood on the sideline and watched pregame warm-ups. And as they headed into the tunnel to make final preparations, he slapped hands with running back Ray Rice. Ali also attended the game and watched from a private suite. He apparently left before halftime.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
As the Ravens finished up their final full practice before their season opener against the Cincinnati Bengals on Monday night, they welcomed a visitor who left some of their players in awe. Legendary boxing champion Muhammad Ali took in today's practice at the Under Armour Performance Center. Wearing a purple Ravens' T-shirt, the 70-year-old watched practice from a golf cart. He then posed for pictures with coach John Harbaugh , who traced Ali's right hand on a notepad.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
It began in Wheaton with a single gunshot. James D. Martin, 55, had stopped off at a Shoppers Food Warehouse on his way home when, for no apparent reason, an unseen assailant shot and killed him. The next morning, four others in Montgomery County were killed while doing mundane activities - pumping gas, mowing a lawn, sitting on a bench, vacuuming a minivan. A sixth victim fell that night in Washington near the county line. Over three terrifying weeks in October 2002, the so-called Beltway Sniper fatally shot 10 people in the Washington region, ratcheting up anxiety levels all the way from Baltimore to Richmond.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
The use of Islam to justify killing is "an innovation" in the religion, a Muslim scholar told a Baltimore conference Saturday, and warned: "Most innovations lead to hellfire." "The Satan always has people that he will be able to deceive," Dr. Waleed Basyouni said during a presentation he called "Reclaiming Islam from the Jihadists." Hundreds of Muslims went to the Baltimore Convention Center on Saturday to hear Basyouni and others promote what organizers described as a moderate, modern interpretation of Islam for the United States and the West.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
Imagine that you're a movie director preparing to make a bio-pic. The story has box office potential, with an exotic desert locale, epic sword battles and a compelling hero known to billions. But there's one hitch: The title character can't actually appear in the movie. You can't even use his voice. That's the conundrum the makers of Mohammed: The Last Prophet faced in bringing the story of Islam's prophet to the big screen in an animated film that opens next month around the country.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2004
Defense attorneys for convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad wanted to argue that their client suffered from an "abnormal brain" and "neurological deficits" about the time of the shootings that left 10 dead in October 2002, according to reports from mental health experts made public yesterday. The information was not allowed into evidence at Muhammad's trial last fall, when a jury convicted him of two counts of capital murder and recommended a death sentence, because Muhammad refused to meet with the prosecution's mental health experts.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | September 17, 2009
A Northern Virginia judge Wednesday set Nov. 10 as the execution date for sniper John Allen Muhammad, whose wave of random shootings terrified the Washington region in 2002. Prince William County Circuit Court Judge Mary Grace O'Brien chose the date during a teleconference with lawyers in the case Wednesday morning, said Jon Sheldon, an attorney for Muhammad. He said Muhammad plans to ask Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine for clemency and to file an appeal with the U.S. Supreme Court. A federal appellate court rejected his latest appeal last month.
NEWS
August 8, 2009
Police probe 2 shootings that left five people injured Baltimore police are investigating two separate shootings. One man was shot in the face and another in the foot about 11:30 p.m. Thursday in the 200 block of S. Dallas Court in the Perkins Homes public housing complex in East Baltimore, police said. No further information was available. About an hour later, three men were shot in the 3700 block of Glenmore Ave. in Northeast Baltimore, police said. Officers responding to reports of gunfire found the first victim, 19, with gunshot wounds to his back and foot.
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