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NEWS
August 22, 2002
A MESSAGE TO Washington: Yes, President Robert G. Mugabe and his disastrous policies are responsible for Zimbabwe's growing economic troubles, including a serious famine. But the U.S. government's pledge this week to bolster his critics could make matters worse, unless such an intervention is handled craftily and with care. In fact, it is likely that any overt U.S. aid would be a kiss of death to human rights activists, labor unions and pro-democracy movements at the receiving end. After all, "Comrade" Mugabe, a doctrinaire Marxist who insists on that honorific, is a power-mad -- and possibly unstable -- man. He is also so unforgiving and vengeful that he doesn't care about the consequences.
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NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | January 31, 2009
JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - Facing severe pressure from Southern African leaders, Zimbabwe's opposition voted yesterday to join a unity government under President Robert G. Mugabe, despite failing to win its key demand for control of the police. The opposition will share control of the police ministry with Mugabe's party, an arrangement that many in the opposition see as unworkable. Mugabe retains control of the military and intelligence ministries. The U.N., meanwhile, reported that Zimbabwe has suffered more than 60,000 cholera cases since August, surpassing what experts had said would be a worst-case scenario.
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NEWS
May 13, 2003
THE CLOCK is ticking for Zimbabwe's 79-year-old President Robert G. Mugabe. He has five years left of his current term, but he is under growing pressure to step aside - and the sooner he leaves, the better. Mr. Mugabe's precarious situation was underscored last week when the presidents of South Africa, Nigeria and Malawi met with him and his main opponent, Morgan Tsvangirai. The mediators ostensibly failed in their mission to bring an end to Zimbabwe's political and economic chaos, yet their very intervention sent a powerful psychological message.
NEWS
October 20, 2008
The fate of Southern Africa is hanging in the balance as a result of continuing upheavals in Zimbabwe and South Africa, where political instability and economic uncertainty are threatening to unravel the promise both nations once held out of being models for the region after emerging from white minority rule more than a decade ago. It's a situation that demands international attention. In Zimbabwe, negotiations between President Robert Mugabe's ruling ZANU-PF party and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change collapsed over Mr. Mugabe's refusal to make good on a power-sharing deal signed last month that would have given Mr. Tsvangirai's party a significant role in the government.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 27, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's president, Robert G. Mugabe, has moved to require that virtually all public companies cede controlling interests to "indigenous citizens," a plan the government calls black empowerment and Mugabe's critics label a bid to shore up his crumbling political support. The proposal, issued in draft legislation published Monday, would transfer a 51 percent stake in the companies to Zimbabweans who were "disadvantaged by unfair discrimination on the grounds of his or her race" before April 1980, when the nation won independence from white rule.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 11, 1995
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Leonard looked around his small apartment and realized he had been robbed. Someone who was staying with him for a few days had taken his television set and CD player.He knew who had done it -- but Leonard was nervous about going to the police, because Leonard is gay, making him one of the targets of new, somewhat bewildering attacks from Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe's increasingly autocratic president. In speeches, Mr. Mugabe has taken to criticizing homosexuals as "sexual perverts" and insisting that they have no political rights.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | August 7, 2006
ATLANTA -- With the Middle East near a full-fledged conflagration, with the janjaweed militias continuing their campaign of genocide in Darfur, with Afghanistan again spiraling out of control, it's hard to shine a spotlight on one small disaster in a faraway corner of the world. Nevertheless, a moment of mourning for the once-proud African nation that was Zimbabwe seems in order. Oh, it's still there on the map. But it's hardly a functioning nation anymore. It has been brought low in a single generation by the tyranny of just one man, Robert G. Mugabe, who has been in power since 1980.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 1, 2008
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- The main opposition party pressed its claim yesterday that it had won a landslide election victory to unseat Zimbabwe President Robert G. Mugabe, but the government said nothing about the presidential vote 48 hours after ballots had been cast. The only official announcement was that both sides were tied in early parliamentary results. At a news conference yesterday, officials from the opposition party, the Movement for Democratic Change, claimed to have seen the results from more than half of the constituencies and that, according to their calculations, the opposition presidential candidate, Morgan Tsvangirai, had won 60 percent of the presidential vote to beat the 84-year-old Mugabe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 19, 2002
HARARE, Zimbabwe - The presidents of South Africa and Nigeria flew to Zimbabwe yesterday and urged President Robert G. Mugabe and his opposition party rival to work together to salvage this nation, which is troubled by food shortages, unemployment and simmering political tensions. Mugabe, who has run Zimbabwe for 22 years, was inaugurated Sunday for a new term after an election tainted by irregularities. Morgan Tsvangirai, the opposition leader, has refused to accept defeat, contending that the voting, March 9-11, was rigged.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 24, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's government quickly distanced itself from an editorial in the state-run newspaper yesterday that called for a transitional unity government headed by the country's longtime strongman, Robert G. Mugabe, until new elections could be organized. Zimbabwe has been plunged into political crisis since its disputed elections last month, with the government refusing to announce who won the race for president. Still, the ruling party has repeatedly argued that neither Mugabe nor his chief rival, Morgan Tsvangirai, won a majority of the votes, forcing the two into a runoff.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | September 12, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Bitter rivals reached a power-sharing deal yesterday that leaves Robert G. Mugabe president of Zimbabwe and in control of its armed forces but gives his opponents hopes for enough power to rescue the shattered country. The complicated agreement makes Mugabe's rival, Morgan Tsvangirai of the Movement for Democratic Change, prime minister and creates a government whose ministers meet twice in parallel structures - once with the prime minister in charge and once under the president.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 15, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Hopes for a way forward in Zimbabwe's disputed elections hang on a weekend meeting of the regional Southern African Development Community, after negotiations this week between Zimbabwe's ruling party and the opposition failed to seal a deal. Despite upbeat talk from Zimbabwean President Robert G. Mugabe and the mediator of the talks, South African President Thabo Mbeki, little progress was made on the key issue: the division of power between Mugabe and the opposition leader, Morgan Tsvangirai.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 14, 2008
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - After three days of intensive negotiations to resolve Zimbabwe's political crisis, President Robert G. Mugabe and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai were deadlocked yesterday on the most fundamental issue: which one of them would lead a new unity government. The talks, which began last month with high hopes for a quick settlement, were adjourned with no date set for a resumption. President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa, the official mediator in the crisis, left Harare, Zimbabwe's capital, yesterday without the power-sharing deal he had hoped to broker.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 1, 2008
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - A day after his inauguration for a sixth term as president, Robert G. Mugabe, the runaway winner in a violence-stained electoral race in Zimbabwe, arrived in this Red Sea resort yesterday for an African Union summit, under pressure from the United Nations and his neighbors to negotiate a settlement with his adversaries. Mugabe, 84, flew here as the winner of Zimbabwe's presidential runoff vote, which world leaders called illegitimate because of bloodshed and intimidation, and which African parliamentary monitors said was neither free, fair nor credible.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The government of President Robert G. Mugabe in Zimbabwe was condemned this week in the strongest possible terms for a wave of violence against his political opponents that the U.N. Security Council declared has "made it impossible for a free and fair election to take place" this Friday. Mr. Mugabe's reign of terror has forced Morgan Tsvangirai, his would-be opponent in a runoff election for the Zimbabwean presidency, to withdraw and seek refuge in the Dutch Embassy. A defiant Mr. Mugabe says he plans to go forward with the election, regardless of the international outrage over his behavior.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 22, 2008
During the late 20th century, human rights campaigns led by Western progressives helped to liberate two nations on the tip of the African continent from brutal whites-only rule. In 1980, the apartheid regime of Rhodesia gave way to a black-led Zimbabwe. And in 1994, the first multiracial elections in South Africa delivered the presidency to a black man, the longtime anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela. In the years since, the two nations have traveled very different paths. South Africa has enjoyed stability, a free press, international investment, an independent judiciary and democratic elections - helped by the graceful exit of Mr. Mandela, who retired after one term.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
The government of President Robert G. Mugabe in Zimbabwe was condemned this week in the strongest possible terms for a wave of violence against his political opponents that the U.N. Security Council declared has "made it impossible for a free and fair election to take place" this Friday. Mr. Mugabe's reign of terror has forced Morgan Tsvangirai, his would-be opponent in a runoff election for the Zimbabwean presidency, to withdraw and seek refuge in the Dutch Embassy. A defiant Mr. Mugabe says he plans to go forward with the election, regardless of the international outrage over his behavior.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
The despots are having a bloody field day. In Zimbabwe, President Robert G. Mugabe's surrogates continue to terrorize his people for the sin of exercising their free will. Since the March election, when Mr. Mugabe failed to win a majority, Zimbabweans have been harassed, assaulted and attacked, and as many as 65 killed. The mayhem led opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai to decamp abroad for seven weeks, and since his return May 24 to compete in the presidential runoff election, he has faced a series of indignities.
NEWS
By Suliman Baldo and Comfort Ero | May 1, 2008
Whatever happens in their country during the foreboding days ahead, Zimbabweans know that an "after" is inevitable. An "after Mugabe" will come even if Robert G. Mugabe, the country's 84-year-old president, manages - through a campaign of violence or other means - to claim another term in office. Zimbabwe's political crisis did not begin with this disputed election. Its roots include long-standing limits on free speech, widespread human rights abuses, the failure to resolve issues of land distribution dating from colonial times, cataclysmic mismanagement of the economy, corruption on a gargantuan scale and, not least, the impunity of the wrongdoers.
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