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NEWS
November 25, 2005
On November 20, 2005, MAXWELL KEYES MUDGE, beloved husband of Jacqueline Vernay Mudge; dear father of Bradford Keyes Mudge; dear father-in-law of Jenny-Lynn Ellis; dear grandfather of Maxwell E. Mudge, Weston Mudge Ellis and Thomas Vernay Mudge. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, November 26, at 11 A.M. in the Chapel of the Church of the Redeemer. Please omit flowers. Contributions may be made to Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles Street, 21210 or Mc Donogh School, POB 380, Owings Mills, MD 21117.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 25, 2005
On November 20, 2005, MAXWELL KEYES MUDGE, beloved husband of Jacqueline Vernay Mudge; dear father of Bradford Keyes Mudge; dear father-in-law of Jenny-Lynn Ellis; dear grandfather of Maxwell E. Mudge, Weston Mudge Ellis and Thomas Vernay Mudge. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, November 26, at 11 A.M. in the Chapel of the Church of the Redeemer. Please omit flowers. Contributions may be made to Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles Street, 21210 or Mc Donogh School, POB 380, Owings Mills, MD 21117.
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NEWS
November 22, 2005
Maxwell Keyes Mudge, a retired Alban Tractor Co. executive, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The longtime Roland Park resident was 78. Born and raised in Pikesville, he was a 1945 graduate of McDonogh School, where he played baseball. After serving in the Army, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history at the Johns Hopkins University and was president of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. He then joined Alban Tractor, a local Caterpillar tractor distributorship.
NEWS
November 22, 2005
Maxwell Keyes Mudge, a retired Alban Tractor Co. executive, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at the Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. The longtime Roland Park resident was 78. Born and raised in Pikesville, he was a 1945 graduate of McDonogh School, where he played baseball. After serving in the Army, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history at the Johns Hopkins University and was president of the Delta Upsilon fraternity. He then joined Alban Tractor, a local Caterpillar tractor distributorship.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | August 10, 1993
BOSTON -- Reggie Lewis showed no signs of an abnormal heart when he underwent a stress test three days before he collapsed during a playoff game April 29, the Celtics' physician said yesterday.Dr. Arnold D. Scheller also was critical of the diagnosis by a second team of doctors that said Lewis had a "normal athlete's heart" and might be able to resume playing, calling its actions "cavalier."Scheller said yesterday he routinely monitors the heart rate of each of the Celtics twice a year while they exercise on a treadmill.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Rylant | April 12, 1998
"I have an idea," Henry's mother said.Henry opened his eyes.Henry's father sat up.But Mudge kept on sleeping.He didn't care much about ideas.Not until the ideas smelled like something."Let's make a castle," said Henry's mother."A castle?" said Henry and Henry's father."We still have the box the new refrigerator came in, and the box the new stove came in."Henry was getting the idea."And that paint set Uncle Arthur gave me," said Henry."Let's do it!"They headed for the basement.Mudge was still trying to sleep.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | September 11, 1994
The mother of Reggie Lewis recalls the conversation vividly."I stake my reputation on this," Dr. Gilbert H. Mudge Jr. said.It was the day before Mother's Day in 1993. Inez "Peggy" Ritch and several other of Lewis' relatives from Baltimore were visiting him at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.Lewis seemed delighted with his latest diagnosis -- Mudge said he was suffering from a fainting condition, nothing more. Ritch recalls his riding a stationary bicycle in the hospital and joking about a TV report that said he would undergo surgery to receive a pacemaker.
NEWS
March 22, 2000
"Wait until you read 'Henry and Mudge and the Bed Time Thumps' by Cynthia Rylant. A boy named Henry and his dog, Mudge, are going to Henry's grandmother's house. Mudge is sent outside, and Henry goes with him. The pictures in the book are great! Find out what happens to Henry and Mudge." -- Joel Ranadive Hampton Elementary "I read three Pippi Longstocking books by Astrid Lindgren. My favorite one is 'Pippi in the South Seas.' I like this one best because Pippi is a princess and she goes to see her dad. I think other kids would enjoy all the books."
SPORTS
By Peter May and Peter May,Boston Globe | July 16, 1993
BOSTON -- He has been working out on his own. He has gone to California in his role as team captain to represent the Boston Celtics at the funeral of Brian Shaw's parents. He has signed autographs cheerfully and exchanged pleasantries with his teammates.He has done all of that. Yet Reggie Lewis, the Celtics' leading scorer and Baltimore Dunbar alum, has not participated in any supervised, simulated basketball game or scrimmage since his scary collapse in the first round of the playoffs, more than two months ago.Twenty-nine days ago, Celtics CEO Dave Gavitt told reporters it was "very likely" that Lewis would participate in some form of structured drill or workout at either last week's minicamp run by Larry Bird, or this week's rookie/free-agent camp.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
It's not often that a potential star of English racing winds up in a Maryland barn.But that's the case with Grapeshot, a 5-year-old who has been winning races for his trainer, Ann W. Merryman, and his five Maryland owners in a manner befitting a former contender for the English Derby.His next race will be the Damascus Handicap on Saturday at Laurel Park.Grapeshot's arduous path to Maryland began while preparing for the Derby in the spring of 1997, when he injured his suspensory ligament under the care of trainer Luca Cumani.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 24, 2003
Maryland Film Festival chief Jed Dietz reports from the Sundance Film Festival that a recent recipient of the Producers Club of Maryland Fellowship - an annual award given to a project emerging from the Sundance Lab - is up for this year's Grand Jury Prize: Michael Burke's The Mudge Boy, the story of an isolated rural teen-ager (Emile Hirsch, of The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys) who mourns for his mother by mimicking her voice and donning her fur coat. Dietz credits executive producer Stanley Tucci with catalyzing the production and Burke with building on the slim experience of his one acclaimed short, Fish Belly White, and turning out a debut feature that has made its backers proud.
NEWS
March 22, 2000
"Wait until you read 'Henry and Mudge and the Bed Time Thumps' by Cynthia Rylant. A boy named Henry and his dog, Mudge, are going to Henry's grandmother's house. Mudge is sent outside, and Henry goes with him. The pictures in the book are great! Find out what happens to Henry and Mudge." -- Joel Ranadive Hampton Elementary "I read three Pippi Longstocking books by Astrid Lindgren. My favorite one is 'Pippi in the South Seas.' I like this one best because Pippi is a princess and she goes to see her dad. I think other kids would enjoy all the books."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
It's not often that a potential star of English racing winds up in a Maryland barn.But that's the case with Grapeshot, a 5-year-old who has been winning races for his trainer, Ann W. Merryman, and his five Maryland owners in a manner befitting a former contender for the English Derby.His next race will be the Damascus Handicap on Saturday at Laurel Park.Grapeshot's arduous path to Maryland began while preparing for the Derby in the spring of 1997, when he injured his suspensory ligament under the care of trainer Luca Cumani.
SPORTS
March 26, 1999
BasketballNortheastern probe found no evidence Lewis used drugsAn internal Northeastern University investigation turned over in a court battle over the sudden death of Boston Celtics star and Dunbar alumnus Reggie Lewis found no evidence that he used cocaine in college.In a motion filed in the medical malpractice case, lawyers for Lewis' estate said "every credible witness with personal knowledge states unequivocally before the Northeastern Commission that Reggie Lewis never used cocaine."
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | February 7, 1999
BOSTON -- The explosive allegations that Reggie Lewis used cocaine could trigger an investigation by the insurance companies that made good on his multimillion-dollar contract with the Boston Celtics and his widow.Friday, William J. Dailey, the attorney for Dr. Gilbert H. Mudge Jr., Lewis' chief cardiologist, said "a significant portion" of the $13 million to $14 million Donna Harris-Lewis collected soon after her husband's death "could be contested" because Lewis denied he used cocaine on the insurance application.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Rylant | September 20, 1998
In April it rained day after day after day after day.Henry was getting bored. Mudge was chewing up everything in the house. So Henry said, "Let's play outside anyway."He put on his raincoat and sneakers and went outside with Mudge. Henry forgot to ask his father if it was all right.When Mudge stepped into the wet grass, he lifted his paws and shook them. "Too bad you don't have sneakers," Henry said. And he walked in a circle around Mudge. Squish, squish, squish, squish.Mudge listened and looked at Henry.
NEWS
By ALAN GREENBERG | August 3, 1993
Most weeks, the sports pages are filled with uplifting stories about athletes who beat the medical odds. Injured or ill athletes who played when they were not expected to play again. Injured athletes who played when they were not even expected to walk again. Athletes who surpassed their delighted doctors' most optimistic prognoses.But last week was not most weeks. Celtics captain Reggie Lewis, as fine a person as he was a basketball player, collapsed and died Tuesday while shooting baskets at Brandeis University, nearly three months after he had collapsed and revived during a Celtics-Hornets playoff game.
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | February 7, 1999
BOSTON -- The explosive allegations that Reggie Lewis used cocaine could trigger an investigation by the insurance companies that made good on his multimillion-dollar contract with the Boston Celtics and his widow.Friday, William J. Dailey, the attorney for Dr. Gilbert H. Mudge Jr., Lewis' chief cardiologist, said "a significant portion" of the $13 million to $14 million Donna Harris-Lewis collected soon after her husband's death "could be contested" because Lewis denied he used cocaine on the insurance application.
FEATURES
By Courtesy of Visa Rewards "Read Me a Story" | May 13, 1998
Henry and his lovable pet dog Mudge are a pair who find themselves in messes and adventures, revealing the specialness their friendship brings to each new story. Whether Henry is rescuing a stranded cat or taking his big dog to make angels in the snow, the duo explore the world around them with laughter and fun.Book titles in the series by Cynthia Rylant include:"Henry and Mudge in the Green Time""Henry and Mudge and the Careful Cousin""Henry and Mudge and the Happy Cat""Henry and Mudge in Puddle Trouble""Henry and Mudge and the Forever Sea""Henry and Mudge in the Sparkle Days""Henry and Mudge Under the Yellow Moon"Pub Date: 5/13/98
FEATURES
By Cynthia Rylant | April 12, 1998
"I have an idea," Henry's mother said.Henry opened his eyes.Henry's father sat up.But Mudge kept on sleeping.He didn't care much about ideas.Not until the ideas smelled like something."Let's make a castle," said Henry's mother."A castle?" said Henry and Henry's father."We still have the box the new refrigerator came in, and the box the new stove came in."Henry was getting the idea."And that paint set Uncle Arthur gave me," said Henry."Let's do it!"They headed for the basement.Mudge was still trying to sleep.
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