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By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | August 14, 1994
Ocean City -- It's a pretty big show for a small town -- and Ocean City's officials are delighted that B.B. King, Dr. John, Little Feat and a musical tribute to Muddy Waters coming to the Convention Center Aug. 17."Pre-ticket sales are going pretty well," says Buck Mann, who heads the town's Tourism Committee, which reviews all events put on by Ocean City.Careful planning and aggressive booking by Ocean City is what brings big names to town, he explains."Our problem with any of these concerts is, we have to get them in transit from one big gig to another," Mr. Mann says.
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NEWS
February 27, 2014
It's a really sad thing if Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column in The Sun is the quality of commentary that Baltimore and the surrounding area deserve ( "News of the future," Feb. 23). This is a former governor and public office holder writing like a blogger. I have a lot of doubt that this reflects actual beliefs and not just pandering or doing his part for his party or group. It would be laughable if he wasn't actually working to muddy the waters on issues that are actually relevant to the people of Baltimore and the world.
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | February 26, 1993
Holly Springs,Miss. -- TWO or three times a month, the phone rings in R.L. Burnside's little farmhouse on Highway 4; calls from strangers asking if they can stop by to talk about the blues.The last time Mr. Burnside's phone jumped with a curious ring, the callers were pilgrims from Baltimore."Sure, I remember you," said the 66-year-old guitarist who learned his lessons by watching Mississippi Fred McDowell and Muddy Waters. "Come on over."I had met "Rule" Burnside once before, when he played at the Cat's Eye Pub on Thames Street in May 1986.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 7, 2013
The current row over who's to blame for the latest government showdown brings to mind the story of the two men arguing on a street corner whether the world is round or flat. They agree to ask an amiable passer-by to settle the matter. He ponders the question for a moment, then tells them: "Among men of good will, the truth must surely lie somewhere in between. " That's about the way it is among all those casual onlookers who insist both sides in the fight must share the blame for the stalemate.
NEWS
By Gulf News, United Arab Emirates | February 22, 1991
IF GORBACHEV'S peace plan is accepted, it would raise the question whether an arrangement has been reached between the two superpowers under which this region will be divided in terms of dominance between the Soviet Union and the Western powers. [The region] would fall into the same patterns as imposed on Europe following World War II. Gorbachev wandered off into muddy waters by urging there be no punitive action against Saddam. [He] endangered his peace plan and raised suspicions that he may be thinking long term rather than trying to avert a land war.
NEWS
March 20, 1995
Sunnyland Slim, 87, a legendary blues pianist who helped power the raucous Chicago sound, died Friday in Chicago, Alligator Records announced.Slim, also a singer and composer, was awarded a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1988 and was lauded as one of America's great traditional artists.Born Albert Luandrew in Vance, Miss., he began his career playing piano and organ in church, and went on to record more than 20 albums over seven decades. He got his first job playing in a movie theater in 1924 and later moved north, eventually signing with Chess Records in Chicago.
NEWS
May 22, 2000
MISSISSIPPI has no state flag. The banner that everyone thought was the state flag incorporates the Confederate battle flag and has flown since the 19th century. But the Mississippi Supreme Court ruled that that flag is not official, giving Mississippi a chance to adopt one that all of its residents can salute. Mississipians of all races -- it was the home of William Faulkner, Elvis Presley, Richard Wright and Muddy Waters -- deserve a symbol of pride. The new, official banner could carry images of the state's tree (the magnolia)
NEWS
By GARY GATELY | December 15, 1996
CHICAGO -- In search of musical roots and a legacy of living blues, I journey to the old Chess Records building in a once-proud South Side neighborhood reduced to vacant lots and warehouses. Shivers course through me as I gaze at the building's weathered facade as a student of classical architecture might ponder the Parthenon. Here, in a second-floor studio, the ghosts of the blues masters still play the music transplanted from the Mississippi Delta and electrified with a new, raw energy.
FEATURES
By New York Times | January 30, 1992
Willie Dixon, who wrote blues standards and produced many classic blues albums, died of heart failure yesterday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, Calif. He was 76 and lived in southern California.As a songwriter, producer, arranger and bassist, Dixon was a towering figure in the creation of Chicago blues, which was in turn a cornerstone of rock 'n' roll.His songs were performed by leading blues figures, including Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf, and picked up by rock bands including the Rolling Stones, Cream and the Doors.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
In the 1950s and '60s, American Jews and blacks had two glorious, complex and sometimes-fractious partnerships: civil rights and recording rights. Writer-director Darnell Martin goes for the throat of this killer subject in the scintillating Cadillac Records. Adrien Brody plays Leonard Chess, the Jewish founder of Chess Records who made the Cadillac his label's car of choice. In the 1950s, he put Muddy Waters and then Chuck Berry on the nation's turntables, and paid Alan Freed and other DJs to put them on the air. Thus did Chess, Waters, Berry and Freed invent rock 'n' roll.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
In the 1950s and '60s, American Jews and blacks had two glorious, complex and sometimes-fractious partnerships: civil rights and recording rights. Writer-director Darnell Martin goes for the throat of this killer subject in the scintillating Cadillac Records. Adrien Brody plays Leonard Chess, the Jewish founder of Chess Records who made the Cadillac his label's car of choice. In the 1950s, he put Muddy Waters and then Chuck Berry on the nation's turntables, and paid Alan Freed and other DJs to put them on the air. Thus did Chess, Waters, Berry and Freed invent rock 'n' roll.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Peter.Schmuck@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
In the interest of building some modicum of suspense, the people at Sports Illustrated have assembled a large group of candidates for the magazine's Sportsman of the Year award, which will be announced Tuesday. It is an eclectic group that includes Kobe Bryant (for his altruistic efforts to enhance the globalization of pro basketball), NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson (because he's not the Jimmy Johnson who used to coach the Cowboys), Alex Ovechkin (because he's a hockey player you've actually heard of)
NEWS
May 11, 2007
CAREY BELL, 70 Blues musician Carey Bell, a blues harmonica player who performed with both Muddy Waters' and Willie Dixon's bands, died Sunday of heart failure at Kindred Hospital in Chicago, according to Alligator Records, which released several of Mr. Bell's albums. Carey Bell Harrington was born in Macon, Miss., and wanted a saxophone but his family couldn't afford one. Instead, his grandfather bought him a harmonica. He was playing the harmonica by age 8, and in 1956, at age 19, he moved to Chicago with his godfather, pianist Lovie Lee. Soon, he was supporting himself as a professional musician, playing on the street for tips, said Alligator label president Bruce Iglauer.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | May 10, 2007
Concern about the environmental impact of a proposed 1,300-home development along Kent Island's waterfront - and local officials' inability to talk about it - prompted the Board of Public Works yesterday to get in the middle of a long-simmering dispute over building in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The three-member state board heard hours of testimony from the developer and from Queen Anne's County residents who worry about the effect of the project on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, eventually deciding to delay approval of a routine wetlands license to gather more information.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 21, 2006
The apocalypse must be near when even a mermaid movie gets a Messiah complex. The title character of Lady in the Water is a beautiful sea nymph who yearns to reawaken land folk to the forgotten hopes and wonders of life. Sounds simple - maybe even simple-minded. But if you're not a fan of M. Night Shyamalan's convoluted, teasing thrillers, you'll find that getting into this movie is like cracking a puzzle in which the constructor keeps breaking his own rules or grabbing new ones from ultra-thin air. Shyamalan, director of the suspense hits The Sixth Sense and Signs, goes at this fable as if it were something dreamed up during nap time at a progressive kindergarten.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2005
Standing in ankle-deep water, Scott McGill jabbed a hand into Long Green Creek and picked up a cantaloupe-sized rock. He was looking for bugs, but he wasn't having much luck. "There's always going to be insects trying to make a living there," said McGill, an environmental consultant and trout preservationist, as he held the glistening rock in the September sunlight. "If you come to a stream like this and you don't find many insects, it's indicative of a problem." Over his shoulder, in the distance, were the rolling pastures of Whitelyn Farm.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | April 27, 1992
BLUESLAND: PORTRAITS OF TWELVE MAJOR AMERICAN BLUES MASTERS. Edited by Pete Welding and Toby Byron. Dutton. 253 pages. $26.95.THIS BOOK portrays 12 great blues singers and instrumentalists. It is also a musical atlas whose intersecting and diverging lines derivatively link blues with the subsequent eras of jazz and rock 'n' roll.Blues singing has black origins, stemming from popular hymns and from chants sung by slave laborers. Some of the early itinerant blues singers -- who tell of loves gained and lost, work and struggle, suffering and newfound freedom -- seldom strayed from their native South, while others migrated to New Orleans, Memphis and Chicago.
NEWS
May 11, 2007
CAREY BELL, 70 Blues musician Carey Bell, a blues harmonica player who performed with both Muddy Waters' and Willie Dixon's bands, died Sunday of heart failure at Kindred Hospital in Chicago, according to Alligator Records, which released several of Mr. Bell's albums. Carey Bell Harrington was born in Macon, Miss., and wanted a saxophone but his family couldn't afford one. Instead, his grandfather bought him a harmonica. He was playing the harmonica by age 8, and in 1956, at age 19, he moved to Chicago with his godfather, pianist Lovie Lee. Soon, he was supporting himself as a professional musician, playing on the street for tips, said Alligator label president Bruce Iglauer.
NEWS
June 15, 2003
OF ALL THE measures used to evaluate the quality of the Chesapeake Bay waters, few match the bluntness of Bernie Fowler's sneaker test. Every June, the former crabber and state senator from Calvert County wades into the Patuxent River as far as he can go until he can't see his shoes anymore. Last June, he made it about 3 1/2 feet - almost a 10-year record high for clarity. During last week's wade-in, after an extraordinary few months of record-breaking snow and rain, Mr. Fowler's sneakers disappeared at just over 2 feet.
NEWS
June 1, 2000
Courage in service of oppression isn't worth celebrating Two recent letters argued we can honor Confederate soldiers without venerating slavery and racial oppression ("Honoring Southern soldiers need not venerate slavery," May 23). This despite the fact the Confederacy went to war in defense of slavery as the "Southern way of life." Both writers seem to think that we can simply admire the courage of the soldiers without considering the ends which that courage served. This I find problematic.
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