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NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | November 11, 2005
How long are you contagious when you have a cold? It depends on which virus is causing the cold, and there are lots - including rhinoviruses, adenoviruses and coronaviruses, to name a few, said Dr. Lindsey Baden, an infectious disease specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Typically, you are most likely to spread the virus to other people from a point just before symptoms appear through the first few days of an illness, when symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and production of nasal mucus are highest.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 1, 2007
Let us speak of the sorrows of fame. You are a hot young thing on a promotional tour for your book or movie or perfume and the limo brings you to the small luxury hotel and the celebrity suite where you step into the bathroom and notice a wad of snot protruding from your left nostril. How long has this been hanging there? You've spent all day mingling with people ecstatic at the sight of you you you, and yet not one of them dared mention this mucus ballooning from your nasal cavity. Nor did your publicist Stephanie, nor the reporters at the press opportunity.
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NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Discovery of a way to activate stalled molecular water pumps inside human cells "opens the way" to arresting the course of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common fatal genetic diseases in America, government health officials said yesterday.With luck, a drug to treat cystic fibrosis based on that discovery could be at the testing stage within a year, said Dr. Michael R. Knowles, one of three University of North Carolina medical school researchers who announced the finding.The basic defect is the inability of the cells to maintain sufficient water to thin mucus in the lungs, he said.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | January 19, 2007
Why does my nose run in the cold? Nobody knows for sure, but one reason is that the nose has to "work overtime," when the inspired air is cold, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. The nose is a kind of "fancy air conditioner" whose job is to warm and humidify the air we inhale, Metson wrote in an e-mail. When the air we breathe in is unusually cold, the nose kicks into high gear to warm and humidify it - blood vessels dilate, mucosal tissue swells and glands secrete extra mucus.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | September 12, 2001
FOREST FROGS Tomato frogs are only found in Madagascar, an island nation to the west of Africa, mainly in forest areas. The adults can grow pretty big! Males can be 2 1/2 inches in lenght while females can be 3 to 4 inches long. Their colors range from reddish-orange to dark red. What's for dinner? Crickets, worms and even mice! Do you know? Are tomato frogs poisonous? Answer: They are not toxic but can give off a very sticky white mucus that can be irritating to human eyes. Learn more!
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2004
OK. So your daily attempt at perfection already includes brushing and flossing, exercising, meditating, eating fruits and veggies, and overall clean, healthy living. Here's one more health habit you might consider. (Or not.) In lay terms, it's called keeping your nose clean. In fancier language, it's nasal lavage -- also known as nasal irrigation or sinus rinsing. It's a simple, low-tech way to wash out the viruses, bacteria, mold, allergens, dust, mucus and general crud that lands inside the nose and sinus passages, thereby contributing to colds, chronic nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, frequent sinus infections, asthma and other respiratory ills.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | January 31, 1991
Some of the nearly 5,000 Americans who die from asthma each year may suffocate to death because they have not taken the proper medications.Doctors may not be prescribing the proper medicine to treat the underlying cause of the disease, and patients may be waiting too long before seeking help when they have an asthma attack, according to the findings of a study published today.Deaths from asthma have been rising for the last 10 years, according to the national Centers for Disease Control. In 1987, 4,360 people in the United States died from asthma, compared with 2,891 in 1980.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
With one exception, blond-haired Gunnar Esiason is like almost any other 4-year-old boy. He's big on the birthday party circuit, likes to have friends over, and is active in all kinds of sports.The exception is a flawed gene that makes all the difference to him and his parents, Boomer and Cheryl Esiason.Gunnar is one of approximately 30,000 Americans afflicted with cystic fibrosis, a deadly genetic disease that attacks the respiratory and digestive systems of children and young adults.The defective gene controls the flow of mucus in the body.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | January 19, 2007
Why does my nose run in the cold? Nobody knows for sure, but one reason is that the nose has to "work overtime," when the inspired air is cold, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. The nose is a kind of "fancy air conditioner" whose job is to warm and humidify the air we inhale, Metson wrote in an e-mail. When the air we breathe in is unusually cold, the nose kicks into high gear to warm and humidify it - blood vessels dilate, mucosal tissue swells and glands secrete extra mucus.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
A jury has awarded a West Baltimore woman roughly $3.7 million in the death of her 2-year-old son, who died the morning after he was treated and released from the University of Maryland Medical Center's emergency room. The toddler, Jamal Mallory, had been taken to the hospital because he was having trouble breathing. Had Jamal been admitted, said the family's attorney, Henry E. Dugan Jr., he might have been saved. "Then they would have been able to intervene by doing suctioning and giving oxygen," said Dugan, a Baltimore malpractice attorney.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2007
It began with mollusk mucus -- not the most inviting thought -- a gooey, staining secretion from sea snails. Its dark-red color so delighted folks in ancient times that they used it as a coveted fabric dye. The Greeks coined it porphura. Medieval Europe combined it with rare blue dye to create what they called purple -- a bold, distinctive and expensive hue reserved for aristocrats and royalty. That's when the color's allure took hold, back when it was difficult to come by.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | November 11, 2005
How long are you contagious when you have a cold? It depends on which virus is causing the cold, and there are lots - including rhinoviruses, adenoviruses and coronaviruses, to name a few, said Dr. Lindsey Baden, an infectious disease specialist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Typically, you are most likely to spread the virus to other people from a point just before symptoms appear through the first few days of an illness, when symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and production of nasal mucus are highest.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 2004
OK. So your daily attempt at perfection already includes brushing and flossing, exercising, meditating, eating fruits and veggies, and overall clean, healthy living. Here's one more health habit you might consider. (Or not.) In lay terms, it's called keeping your nose clean. In fancier language, it's nasal lavage -- also known as nasal irrigation or sinus rinsing. It's a simple, low-tech way to wash out the viruses, bacteria, mold, allergens, dust, mucus and general crud that lands inside the nose and sinus passages, thereby contributing to colds, chronic nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, frequent sinus infections, asthma and other respiratory ills.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | September 12, 2001
FOREST FROGS Tomato frogs are only found in Madagascar, an island nation to the west of Africa, mainly in forest areas. The adults can grow pretty big! Males can be 2 1/2 inches in lenght while females can be 3 to 4 inches long. Their colors range from reddish-orange to dark red. What's for dinner? Crickets, worms and even mice! Do you know? Are tomato frogs poisonous? Answer: They are not toxic but can give off a very sticky white mucus that can be irritating to human eyes. Learn more!
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2000
A jury has awarded a West Baltimore woman roughly $3.7 million in the death of her 2-year-old son, who died the morning after he was treated and released from the University of Maryland Medical Center's emergency room. The toddler, Jamal Mallory, had been taken to the hospital because he was having trouble breathing. Had Jamal been admitted, said the family's attorney, Henry E. Dugan Jr., he might have been saved. "Then they would have been able to intervene by doing suctioning and giving oxygen," said Dugan, a Baltimore malpractice attorney.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
With one exception, blond-haired Gunnar Esiason is like almost any other 4-year-old boy. He's big on the birthday party circuit, likes to have friends over, and is active in all kinds of sports.The exception is a flawed gene that makes all the difference to him and his parents, Boomer and Cheryl Esiason.Gunnar is one of approximately 30,000 Americans afflicted with cystic fibrosis, a deadly genetic disease that attacks the respiratory and digestive systems of children and young adults.The defective gene controls the flow of mucus in the body.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 1, 2007
Let us speak of the sorrows of fame. You are a hot young thing on a promotional tour for your book or movie or perfume and the limo brings you to the small luxury hotel and the celebrity suite where you step into the bathroom and notice a wad of snot protruding from your left nostril. How long has this been hanging there? You've spent all day mingling with people ecstatic at the sight of you you you, and yet not one of them dared mention this mucus ballooning from your nasal cavity. Nor did your publicist Stephanie, nor the reporters at the press opportunity.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2007
It began with mollusk mucus -- not the most inviting thought -- a gooey, staining secretion from sea snails. Its dark-red color so delighted folks in ancient times that they used it as a coveted fabric dye. The Greeks coined it porphura. Medieval Europe combined it with rare blue dye to create what they called purple -- a bold, distinctive and expensive hue reserved for aristocrats and royalty. That's when the color's allure took hold, back when it was difficult to come by.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Discovery of a way to activate stalled molecular water pumps inside human cells "opens the way" to arresting the course of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common fatal genetic diseases in America, government health officials said yesterday.With luck, a drug to treat cystic fibrosis based on that discovery could be at the testing stage within a year, said Dr. Michael R. Knowles, one of three University of North Carolina medical school researchers who announced the finding.The basic defect is the inability of the cells to maintain sufficient water to thin mucus in the lungs, he said.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | January 31, 1991
Some of the nearly 5,000 Americans who die from asthma each year may suffocate to death because they have not taken the proper medications.Doctors may not be prescribing the proper medicine to treat the underlying cause of the disease, and patients may be waiting too long before seeking help when they have an asthma attack, according to the findings of a study published today.Deaths from asthma have been rising for the last 10 years, according to the national Centers for Disease Control. In 1987, 4,360 people in the United States died from asthma, compared with 2,891 in 1980.
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