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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
The city Housing Authority is not legally qualified to participate in the controversial federal Moving to Opportunity (MTO) housing program, Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden said yesterday.In a letter sent by overnight courier to U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, Mr. Hayden cites HUD's published rules for governments seeking MTO money and a provision that says applicants will be disqualified if they have "serious and unaddressed noncompliance issues with respect to other HUD programs."
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1998
Shirley Hudnall wasn't supposed to fit in this well in her new Pikesville neighborhood. Her neighbors like her, she belongs to the PTA, and her 15-year-old son is doing just fine at Milford Mill Academy.But Moving to Opportunity, the program that brought her from her deteriorating Baltimore neighborhood to a two-bedroom apartment in the suburbs, didn't fare nearly as well.MTO will cease next month, killed by opponents who saw it as a way for Baltimore City to dump its poor and its problems into middle-class neighborhoods.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ed Brandt contributed to this article | September 30, 1994
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden says he expects to meet soon in Washington with U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Henry G. Cisneros to discuss local objections to the controversial Moving to Opportunity program.Mr. Hayden said Mr. Cisneros called Wednesday to propose the meeting. Yesterday, he said, he mailed the secretary videotapes of TV news clips of the raucous MTO protest meetings held in eastern Baltimore County this summer.He said the tapes will give federal officials a sense of local outrage over the program, which will disperse 285 residents of city housing projects to private rental units in Baltimore City and surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
Robert P. Gajdys, who led Baltimore County's anti-poverty agency through a wrenching controversy over its supportive role in the federal Moving to Opportunity program, has announced plans to retire next year at age 60.The raucous dispute in the eastern county over the 1994 federal program to move 285 poor families from the inner city to federally subsidized housing in less-impoverished city and county neighborhoods caused some anxious days, Gajdys said,...
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
The Baltimore County Human Relations Commission has instructed its executive director to investigate any formal discrimination complaint springing from a federal program that would broaden housing choices for residents of Baltimore public housing.The program, Moving to Opportunity, will help about 285 Baltimore families to move from public housing into better neighborhoods in the city and surrounding suburbs. It has been a subject of controversy in eastern Baltimore County, where residents said they feared that their neighborhoods would be flooded by poor families from the inner city.
NEWS
By MICHAEL A. FLETCHER | September 25, 1994
In an abrupt departure from her role as a champion for liberal causes, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski spearheaded a congressional effort to kill a program that moves poor families out of the inner city to better neighborhoods, mostly in the suburbs.Congress earlier this month rescinded $171 million earmarked for expanding the program, called Moving to Opportunity. The money, which for almost a year had gone unspent by HUD, was set aside for a counseling program for Section 8 recipients who are working or in job training.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
The threatened presence of people such as Robin Dudley and her three young children so enraged a community that a federal housing program was killed.Ms. Dudley is a former volunteer with disabled students, and a beneficiary of Moving to Opportunity -- a small, experimental federal program helping 285 Baltimore families move from public housing into more affluent areas in the city and suburbs.Fears and frenzy stirred in eastern Baltimore County by politicians and community activists in last year's election season -- with claims that MTO was a plot by the Baltimore Housing Authority to empty residents from its projects into their neighborhoods -- prompted congressional action killing extension of the national program beyond its initial two-year phase.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
They've never been to Owings Mills, but the idea of moving there sits just fine with 14-year-old twins Harold E. Henry III and Frank J. Henry.For them, life in suburbia would be far better than the danger zone they now call home: the Douglass Homes housing development in East Baltimore."
NEWS
September 2, 1994
The hottest issue of this election season on Baltimore County's east-side is the federal Moving to Opportunity program that would enable 285 inner-city families to move to better neighborhoods in Baltimore and the surrounding counties.Residents of Essex and Dundalk have denounced MTO as a way to dump city ills on their communities. Local political candidates have capitalized on the citizenry's anger by adding their own criticisms of the program. Even contenders for higher offices, mindful of the huge bloc of eastside votes, have tried to score points off the dispute.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
On a warm, late September evening, 300 Dundalk and Essex residents met at Dundalk Middle School to beat a dead horse.For months, politicians and community activists had whipped eastern Baltimore County residents into a frenzy over a small, experimental federal program that will move 285 Baltimore families from public housing into better neighborhoods in the city and surrounding suburbs.They told the audiences that the city wanted to empty its housing projects into their neighborhoods, and their listeners believed it."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Moving away from poverty, Lenora Smith watched the last of her worldly goods head down the tiny elevator from the Flag House Courts public housing project's ninth floor to a borrowed truck waiting below.She left her cramped Flag House apartment for good Feb. 19. She bid farewell to the trash-strewn high-rise where her 16-year-old daughter had become a mother and where she feared that her 15-year-old son would be recruited into the drug trade."Bye, Flag," Ms. Smith said, locking the metal door.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Visiting with Annie Ingram is like attending a revival meeting. Exuberantly, she praises the Lord and Moving to Opportunity -- in that order.Thanks to MTO, a controversial federal housing program, Ms. Ingram and her two sons left the Murphy Homes public housing complex in Baltimore in July, settling in a two-bedroom duplex in the 500 block of East 39th Street.Now, she has a new life -- one that provides some insights as Baltimore and suburban officials squabble over a legal settlement that also would shift the poor out of inner-city public housing.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | May 30, 1995
The threatened presence of people such as Robin Dudley and her three young children so enraged a community that a federal housing program was killed.Ms. Dudley is a former volunteer with disabled students, and a beneficiary of Moving to Opportunity -- a small, experimental federal program helping 285 Baltimore families move from public housing into more affluent areas in the city and suburbs.Fears and frenzy stirred in eastern Baltimore County by politicians and community activists in last year's election season -- with claims that MTO was a plot by the Baltimore Housing Authority to empty residents from its projects into their neighborhoods -- prompted congressional action killing extension of the national program beyond its initial two-year phase.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | November 30, 1994
The Baltimore County Human Relations Commission has instructed its executive director to investigate any formal discrimination complaint springing from a federal program that would broaden housing choices for residents of Baltimore public housing.The program, Moving to Opportunity, will help about 285 Baltimore families to move from public housing into better neighborhoods in the city and surrounding suburbs. It has been a subject of controversy in eastern Baltimore County, where residents said they feared that their neighborhoods would be flooded by poor families from the inner city.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
On a warm, late September evening, 300 Dundalk and Essex residents met at Dundalk Middle School to beat a dead horse.For months, politicians and community activists had whipped eastern Baltimore County residents into a frenzy over a small, experimental federal program that will move 285 Baltimore families from public housing into better neighborhoods in the city and surrounding suburbs.They told the audiences that the city wanted to empty its housing projects into their neighborhoods, and their listeners believed it."
NEWS
October 18, 1994
Rarely do politicians reach such universal agreement as they have in eastern Baltimore County regarding the ugly controversy about the federal Moving to Opportunity housing program. Fifth District Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, like everyone else running on the east side, has publicly knocked MTO. Yet we know of no other pol who did what he did -- confront a hostile crowd at an open meeting last summer with some facts about MTO and the history of Section 8 housing in Baltimore County. Political suicide?
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | September 21, 1994
The controversial, federally subsidized housing program called Moving to Opportunity will proceed despite the objections of Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden, according to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and city Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III.The two Baltimore leaders met last week in Washington with Henry G. Cisneros, secretary of of housing and urban development, Mr. Henson said. He said they briefly discussed the MTO pilot program, which has caused furor in eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Barbara Samuels and Susan Goering | October 3, 1994
THE CONTROVERSY surrounding the Moving to Opportunit program, reminds us that racial fears are never far below the surface in the still segregated and increasingly stratified communities of the Baltimore area.Predictably, MTO opponents have used the usual code words for race (e.g. "welfare mothers", "crime", "low-income housing") and integration (e.g. "social engineering") to detract attention from real problems like unemployment and unchecked suburban sprawl that have destabilized city and older suburban communities inside the beltway.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
They've never been to Owings Mills, but the idea of moving there sits just fine with 14-year-old twins Harold E. Henry III and Frank J. Henry.For them, life in suburbia would be far better than the danger zone they now call home: the Douglass Homes housing development in East Baltimore."
NEWS
By Barbara Samuels and Susan Goering | October 3, 1994
THE CONTROVERSY surrounding the Moving to Opportunit program, reminds us that racial fears are never far below the surface in the still segregated and increasingly stratified communities of the Baltimore area.Predictably, MTO opponents have used the usual code words for race (e.g. "welfare mothers", "crime", "low-income housing") and integration (e.g. "social engineering") to detract attention from real problems like unemployment and unchecked suburban sprawl that have destabilized city and older suburban communities inside the beltway.
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