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Mstislav Rostropovich

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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 28, 2007
Mstislav Rostropovich, an astounding cellist, dynamic conductor and humanitarian of historic impact who defied Soviet authorities in his native Russia and championed personal and artistic freedom throughout the world, died yesterday in Moscow, one month after his 80th birthday. He had reportedly been battling intestinal cancer. Mr. Rostropovich was one of the greatest cellists of the 20th century, capable of coaxing from the instrument an endless array of colors and bringing to a wide-reaching repertoire an indelible level of expressive warmth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
"It's definitely a milestone for me," said cellist Amit Peled about his debut at the Kennedy Center on Sunday, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society. "When I saw who else was on the WPAS season brochure, I freaked out. " WPAS President and CEO Neale Perl had no hesitation about adding the tall, long-haired, 37-year-old Peabody Institute faculty member to the organization's starry roster. "He reminds me of [Gregor] Piatigorsky," Perl said. "Amit has the same imposing physical stature and a tremendous stage presence.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2000
Mstislav Rostropovich breezed through town over the weekend in what is for him a typically whirlwind fashion. This was the if-it's-Saturday-it-must-be-Baltimore leg of a concert schedule that will have him in a dozen countries and two hemispheres before December. It's a schedule the 73-year-old Russian-born cellist seems downright proud of, pulling a copy of his itinerary from his suit pocket after settling into a couch in the cozy alcove of a hotel lobby. From Baltimore, it's off to Japan and China ("It's my first visit - I was so against communism that I wouldn't go there before, but I think China has changed very much")
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 28, 2007
Mstislav Rostropovich, an astounding cellist, dynamic conductor and humanitarian of historic impact who defied Soviet authorities in his native Russia and championed personal and artistic freedom throughout the world, died yesterday in Moscow, one month after his 80th birthday. He had reportedly been battling intestinal cancer. Mr. Rostropovich was one of the greatest cellists of the 20th century, capable of coaxing from the instrument an endless array of colors and bringing to a wide-reaching repertoire an indelible level of expressive warmth.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 9, 1995
Bach, Cello Suites Nos. 1-6, performed by Mstislav Rostropovich (EMI Classics 7243 5 55363):Some of us have waited so long for Rostropovich's Bach that we no longer believed he would ever get around to recording the Bach suites.Like all cellists, Rostropovich has played and studied the Bach suites -- the greatest music for his instrument -- since he was a child. But he did not program them frequently, and he only recorded Suites Nos. 2 and 5, which were once available on a long-out-of-print Vanguard LP.Perhaps Rostropovich felt inhibited about performing the suites in his romantic manner in what was (until fairly recently)
FEATURES
June 28, 1992
For a star-spangled Fourth of July, join the throngs in the nation's capital on Saturday.Festivities begin with a dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence at 10 a.m. from the steps of the National Archives building. The two-hour program includes a concert of American music by a fife and drum corps and a demonstration of Colonial military maneuvers complete with cannon and musket fire. At noon the National Independence Day parade wends its way down Constitution Avenue between Seventh and 17th streets.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 8, 1994
Elgar, Cello Concerto in E minor. Respighi, "Adagio con variazione." Milhaud, Cello Concerto No. 1. Performed by cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and the Moscow Philharmonic and the USSR Radio Orchestra (in the Milhaud), conducted by Gennadi Rozhdestvensky (Russian Disc RD CD 11 104):Perhaps the two greatest omissions from Mstislav Rostropovich's discography are recordings of the Bach Suites for solo cello and the Elgar Concerto. It could be that Rostropovich believed he could not match Janos Starker in the suites or the late Jacqueline Du Pre in the concerto -- although it's difficult to imagine so sublime an egoist believing any such thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
"It's definitely a milestone for me," said cellist Amit Peled about his debut at the Kennedy Center on Sunday, presented by the Washington Performing Arts Society. "When I saw who else was on the WPAS season brochure, I freaked out. " WPAS President and CEO Neale Perl had no hesitation about adding the tall, long-haired, 37-year-old Peabody Institute faculty member to the organization's starry roster. "He reminds me of [Gregor] Piatigorsky," Perl said. "Amit has the same imposing physical stature and a tremendous stage presence.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | November 9, 1990
A funny thing happened to Randall Fleischer on his way to becoming a high school choir director. As an Oberlin Conservatory student, the Canton, Ohio, native got the chance to conduct a full orchestra. He never looked back.Armed with degrees from Oberlin and Indiana University's School of Music, Fleischer pounded the New York pavements and soon became the assistant conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra and founder of a chamber ensemble at St. Bartholomew's Church in Manhattan.Currently in his second year as Mstislav Rostropovich's assistant at Washington's National Symphony, Fleischer will conduct the Annapolis Symphony this weekend as the second entrant in the ASO's 1990-1991 conducting derby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 14, 2000
Giya Kancheli Simi; Magnum Ignotum. Mstislav Rostropovich, cellist; Royal Flanders Philharmonic Orchestra; Jansug Kakhidze, conductor. (ECM New Series) One of the more interesting developments in music during the last few decades is the emergence of a mystical style - slow, contemplative, vaguely (or blatantly) religious in mood, otherworldly, decidedly tonal in harmonic language. Russian (specifically Georgian) composer Giya Kancheli is one of most interesting exponents of this style.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2003
Isabel's untimely arrival on the scene last week disrupted the flow of music, not just electricity. Some performances had to be canceled, others postponed, but the season was clearly back on track over the weekend. A sampling of Sunday's many activities made that quite clear. In the afternoon, Music in the Great Hall opened its 30th anniversary season at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church with an admirably wide-ranging program, featuring seven solid players from around the region. (This was to have been the second presentation of that program, but Friday night's concert was called off due to logistical difficulties caused by the storm.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 1, 2003
With all the Russian music filling Baltimore these days, a drive to Washington - through a slippery snowfall, no less - to hear more of it might strike some folks as a little odd. But there were three compelling reasons to make that trek Thursday night: Sergei Prokofiev, Mstislav Rostropovich and the National Symphony Orchestra. As Rostropovich walked onto the stage of the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, members of the brass section let loose a little fanfare to salute the NSO's former music director, making his first appearance with the ensemble since 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 14, 2000
Giya Kancheli Simi; Magnum Ignotum. Mstislav Rostropovich, cellist; Royal Flanders Philharmonic Orchestra; Jansug Kakhidze, conductor. (ECM New Series) One of the more interesting developments in music during the last few decades is the emergence of a mystical style - slow, contemplative, vaguely (or blatantly) religious in mood, otherworldly, decidedly tonal in harmonic language. Russian (specifically Georgian) composer Giya Kancheli is one of most interesting exponents of this style.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2000
Mstislav Rostropovich breezed through town over the weekend in what is for him a typically whirlwind fashion. This was the if-it's-Saturday-it-must-be-Baltimore leg of a concert schedule that will have him in a dozen countries and two hemispheres before December. It's a schedule the 73-year-old Russian-born cellist seems downright proud of, pulling a copy of his itinerary from his suit pocket after settling into a couch in the cozy alcove of a hotel lobby. From Baltimore, it's off to Japan and China ("It's my first visit - I was so against communism that I wouldn't go there before, but I think China has changed very much")
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 1996
Richard Strauss, "Don Quixote" and "Tod und Verklaerung" ("Death and Transfiguration"), performed by the MET Orchestra, James Levine conducting and (in "Don Quixote") cellist Jerry Grossman, violist Michael Ouzounian and violinist Raymond Gniewek (DG 447 762). Strauss, "Don Quixote," performed by cellist Jacqueline du Pre and the New Philharmonia Orchestra, Adrian Boult conducting; Edouard Lalo, Cello Concerto in D Minor, performed by du Pre and the Cleveland Orchestra, Daniel Barenboim conducting (EMI Classics 5 55528)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 9, 1995
Bach, Cello Suites Nos. 1-6, performed by Mstislav Rostropovich (EMI Classics 7243 5 55363):Some of us have waited so long for Rostropovich's Bach that we no longer believed he would ever get around to recording the Bach suites.Like all cellists, Rostropovich has played and studied the Bach suites -- the greatest music for his instrument -- since he was a child. But he did not program them frequently, and he only recorded Suites Nos. 2 and 5, which were once available on a long-out-of-print Vanguard LP.Perhaps Rostropovich felt inhibited about performing the suites in his romantic manner in what was (until fairly recently)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 14, 1990
In 1945 an American bomb mistakenly hit a Nazi concentration camp. The torrent of shrapnel barely missed a 21-year-old Hungarian-Jewish cellist who had thrown himself in a ditch for protection and the explosion's roar luckily left his hearing unimpaired."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 23, 2003
Isabel's untimely arrival on the scene last week disrupted the flow of music, not just electricity. Some performances had to be canceled, others postponed, but the season was clearly back on track over the weekend. A sampling of Sunday's many activities made that quite clear. In the afternoon, Music in the Great Hall opened its 30th anniversary season at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church with an admirably wide-ranging program, featuring seven solid players from around the region. (This was to have been the second presentation of that program, but Friday night's concert was called off due to logistical difficulties caused by the storm.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 8, 1994
Elgar, Cello Concerto in E minor. Respighi, "Adagio con variazione." Milhaud, Cello Concerto No. 1. Performed by cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and the Moscow Philharmonic and the USSR Radio Orchestra (in the Milhaud), conducted by Gennadi Rozhdestvensky (Russian Disc RD CD 11 104):Perhaps the two greatest omissions from Mstislav Rostropovich's discography are recordings of the Bach Suites for solo cello and the Elgar Concerto. It could be that Rostropovich believed he could not match Janos Starker in the suites or the late Jacqueline Du Pre in the concerto -- although it's difficult to imagine so sublime an egoist believing any such thing.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 29, 1992
Stephen Albert, 51, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who was one of the founders of what has been called the "New Romanticism," was killed Sunday afternoon in a three-car collision on Cape Cod, Mass.The accident left eight other people injured, including the composer's wife, Marilyn, 49, and their children, Joshua, 23, and Katie, 21. Mr. Albert's daughter was released from Cape Cod hospital with minor injuries. His wife and son are listed in stable condition at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
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