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By PETER H. LEWIS | June 17, 1991
When Microsoft Corp. introduces a new version of MS-DOS tomorrow, it will be a welcome upgrade that goes a long way toward lifting the decade-long curse on the operating system software that controls tens of millions of IBM PC and compatible computers worldwide.The curse, which limits the main working memory of MS-DOS to 640 kilobytes, was created by Microsoft and IBM when they collaborated on the original IBM PC in 1981. Back then, 640 kilobytes seemed like more memory than anyone would ever use, since it was 10 times the amount available for the original PC.Most personal computers sold today use microprocessors capable of working with megabytes (millions of bytes, or characters)
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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ and MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ,(Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.) | August 30, 1993
Ever since problems with Microsoft's MS-DOS 6.0 started cropping up in the spring, I've had a stream of letters and calls from users who wonder whether it's "safe" yet to upgrade to the latest version of the operating system.Microsoft has issued a safer version of the disk-caching software that appears to be responsible for many of the data-corruption problems users have reported. But I'd still recommend waiting another month or two till the company releases DOS 6.2, which reportedly deals with most of the issues that aggrieved users have raised.
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BUSINESS
By L. R. Shannon and L. R. Shannon,New York Times News Service | December 16, 1991
A book on MS-DOS, the most popular operating system for personal computers, would be a welcome gift for a friend or relative, but you do have to know a few things before you buy one.First, and most important, is whether the recipient's computer runs DOS.The personal computers made by the International Business Machines Corp., and all the machines compatible with them, are DOS machines. (To be quibbling, true-blue IBM computers use PC-DOS, rather than MS-DOS, but they amount to the same thing.
NEWS
By Mel Tansill Listen, Child | June 25, 1993
MS-DOS Review)Our new computer E-mailhelps us avoid each other.It gives us control.It gives us power.Best of all,it is user friendly. Listen, child,if black ain't beautiful,why do we have a shadow?Why does everybody have one?H.B. Johnson
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | June 24, 1991
Microsoft Corp.'s MS-DOS 5.0 upgrade kit, which updates the operating system software used in tens of millions of IBM PCs and compatibles, includes several new features that used to be found only in specialized utility packages like PC Tools Deluxe or the Norton Utilities.For example, MS-DOS 5.0 now has a better system of formating diskettes and hard disks, a new system for searching for misplaced files, a better graphical "shell" for simplifying DOS operations and preparing users to move to Windows, an improved online help system, and an "undelete" command that allows users to recover a file or directory that was accidentally erased.
NEWS
By Mel Tansill Listen, Child | June 25, 1993
MS-DOS Review)Our new computer E-mailhelps us avoid each other.It gives us control.It gives us power.Best of all,it is user friendly. Listen, child,if black ain't beautiful,why do we have a shadow?Why does everybody have one?H.B. Johnson
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Financial Service | July 22, 1991
Here are summaries of some recent Computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:MS-DOS 5, for PC or compatible with at least 512K RAM, 2.8MB free disk space and previous version of DOS. $99.95 as upgrade from previous MS-DOS version. From Microsoft Corp., One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Wash. 98052-6399. (206) 882-8080.DR DOS 5.0, for PC or compatible with at least 256K RAM and 1.2MB of free hard disk space.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ and MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ,(Michael J. Himowitz is a columnist for The Baltimore Sun.) | August 30, 1993
Ever since problems with Microsoft's MS-DOS 6.0 started cropping up in the spring, I've had a stream of letters and calls from users who wonder whether it's "safe" yet to upgrade to the latest version of the operating system.Microsoft has issued a safer version of the disk-caching software that appears to be responsible for many of the data-corruption problems users have reported. But I'd still recommend waiting another month or two till the company releases DOS 6.2, which reportedly deals with most of the issues that aggrieved users have raised.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
REDMOND, Wash. -- A case of opening-night jitters pervades the sprawling corporate headquarters here that has become the world's software capital.On the verge of introducing its most ambitious software product yet, Windows NT, Microsoft Corp. has found itself in an unusual position: It is trying to ratchet back the expectations of the computer industry and computer users, who have come to expect blockbuster products with clockwork regularity from the world's dominant software publisher.NT stands for "new technology" and its formal introduction at an industry show in Atlanta today has been anticipated for months by the trade press and business publications, as well as by legions of computer hardware and software makers that have designed entire product lines to accommodate it. Microsoft sent about 70,000 test copies not only to those hardware and software people, but also to potential customers.
BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS and PETER McWILLIAMS,1991 Universal Press Syndicate | January 23, 1991
As I was mentioning last week, some things about computing seem needlessly difficult. If you bought your MS-DOS machine from a good store or had a friend tinker with it, you might notice that your computer does not just turn on. It seems to be doing calisthenics before you get your prompt.When you turn on your computer, the first thing it does is to look at a file called CONFIG.SYS and do what it says to do there.Some software -- WordPerfect, Microsoft Windows and a number of other popular programs -- have special requirements for your computer to work properly.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Financial Service | March 30, 1992
Here are summaries of some recent Computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four. One computer indicates poor; four is excellent:TimeClock Plus, for PC-compatible with at least DOS 3 and 320 kilobytes of random-access memory available. AT machine with hard disk and printer recommended. $149.95. From Data Management Inc., P.O. Box 61603, San Angelo, Texas 76906. (800) 749-TIME.Teknon Accounting for MS-DOS, For IBM PC-AT or compatible with at least 640 kilobytes RAM, a hard disk and DOS 3.3 or later.
BUSINESS
By L. R. Shannon and L. R. Shannon,New York Times News Service | December 16, 1991
A book on MS-DOS, the most popular operating system for personal computers, would be a welcome gift for a friend or relative, but you do have to know a few things before you buy one.First, and most important, is whether the recipient's computer runs DOS.The personal computers made by the International Business Machines Corp., and all the machines compatible with them, are DOS machines. (To be quibbling, true-blue IBM computers use PC-DOS, rather than MS-DOS, but they amount to the same thing.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | June 24, 1991
Microsoft Corp.'s MS-DOS 5.0 upgrade kit, which updates the operating system software used in tens of millions of IBM PCs and compatibles, includes several new features that used to be found only in specialized utility packages like PC Tools Deluxe or the Norton Utilities.For example, MS-DOS 5.0 now has a better system of formating diskettes and hard disks, a new system for searching for misplaced files, a better graphical "shell" for simplifying DOS operations and preparing users to move to Windows, an improved online help system, and an "undelete" command that allows users to recover a file or directory that was accidentally erased.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | June 17, 1991
When Microsoft Corp. introduces a new version of MS-DOS tomorrow, it will be a welcome upgrade that goes a long way toward lifting the decade-long curse on the operating system software that controls tens of millions of IBM PC and compatible computers worldwide.The curse, which limits the main working memory of MS-DOS to 640 kilobytes, was created by Microsoft and IBM when they collaborated on the original IBM PC in 1981. Back then, 640 kilobytes seemed like more memory than anyone would ever use, since it was 10 times the amount available for the original PC.Most personal computers sold today use microprocessors capable of working with megabytes (millions of bytes, or characters)
BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS and PETER McWILLIAMS,1991 Universal Press Syndicate | January 16, 1991
Most people blame themselves for not being "technological," or, in the case of computers, "computer literate." Something else was at work, here, however: design.When I bought my first MS-DOS computer some years ago, I was astounded at how complicated DOS was. I found DOS needlessly complex for setting up subdirectories, moving to subdirectories and loading one's program. Why couldn't there be a way to turn on your computer, get a list of your programs and choose the one you wanted to use at the push of a key?
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