Advertisement
IN THE NEWS

Ms

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Franklin Walter Vanik, who became an advocate for those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, died Friday at his parents' Rosedale home after suffering a head injury in an earlier fall. He was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale, he was the son of Franklin Louis Vanik, a retired Crown Cork and Seal mechanical engineer, and Gertrude M. Vanik, an administrative assistant. He attended Red House Run Elementary School and Holabird Junior High School, where his teachers recognized his academic ability and recommended him for a newly created gifted and talented program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Robert M.S. Menzies Sr., president and CEO of Easton Bank and Trust Co. and a civic leader, died Tuesday of multiple myeloma at his Easton home. He was 67. The son of John T. Menzies Jr., former president of Crosse & Blackwell, and Priscilla Fuller Menzies, a homemaker, Robert Michael Stewart Menzies Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Broadway Road in the Worthington Valley. Mr. Menzies, who was known as "Mike," graduated in 1965 from Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, N.Y. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1969 from Randolph Macon College in Ashland, Va., and a certified public accountant certificate from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
I'm a big-tent person, you know. Live and let live, I always say. Milk of human kindness by the quart in every vein. No accounting for tastes, so let people enjoy their innocent pleasures. Life's too short, &c., &c.  But my patience is sorely tried by an article at Westword in which one Jenn Wohletz, whom I take, from her vulgar but uninventive prose and untutored taste in drink, to be a young person, disparages the old-fashioned and the martini.  The old-fashioned is a drink for Old People, she says, and it's a pain for the bartender to make, and "when anyone under the age of 65 orders one, they're only doing it to look cool and impress people.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Bicycling isn't usually fodder for Jeremy Conn, co-host of the popular Scott Garceau sports show on 105.7 The Fan. But the Bike MS: Chesapeake Challenge had a particular meaning for the Baltimore County native. His wife, recently diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, participated in it. "You don't realize how many people are affected by it until you start talking about it," says Conn, whose job is to discuss the Ravens, Orioles and big sports stories of the day. "I get texts, emails and Facebook messages from others dealing with this too. … I'm always surprised by the power of radio.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 2, 2013
In the days of the late Mike Wallace, "60 Minutes" was known for hard-hitting, aggressive journalism that asked the questions viewers wanted answered and held the powerful accountable. The Jan. 27 program on which Steve Kroft interviewed President Obama (at his request, no less) and outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton fell far short of that high standard. It was the kind of softball toss you might have expected if Oprah Winfrey or Barbara Walters had conducted the interview.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 19, 2014
Everybody's got something. Maybe it's something you were born with, maybe something that happened to you, maybe something you did to yourself through bad habits or neglect. But everybody's got something, some physical or emotional blemish measuring the distance from you to perfection. Maybe you're a short guy or a gawky woman. Maybe you're ugly. Maybe you've got cellulite, depression, anorexia, alcoholism, gingivitis, psoriasis or a big nose. Maybe you're fat. Gabourey Sidibe is fat. Morbidly obese, to be exact.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 18, 2012
Whether Susan Rice jumped or was pushed from consideration to succeed retiring Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, her removal from the equation clears one bone of partisan contention from President Barack Obama's plate as he heads into his second term. The UN ambassador asserted that she withdrew her name to save her boss from "an enduring partisan battle" that would further distract him and the country from urgent national priorities, including job creation, deficit reduction, immigration reform and "protecting our national securitiy.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 2, 2013
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will not be facing a challenge from actress Ashley Judd when he runs for re-election next year. Though he may be happy to have avoided the physical comparison -- she, after all, played Marilyn Monroe in a movie, while he looks like an ancient sea turtle dressed in a $1,000 suit -- the Kentucky Republican may miss having such an attractive target for his attack machine. Mr. McConnell is not all that popular back home. Democrats, of course, can't stand him, and tea party Republicans may like him even less.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
Jean-Pierre G. Meyer, former professor and chairman of the Johns Hopkins University mathematics department whose escape from Nazi-occupied France became the subject of a children's book, died April 24 of heart failure at his Guilford residence. He was 83. "He was conscientious and really very smart and kind, and that's not always a combination that goes together," said W. Stephen Wilson, a close friend and math department colleague. "He was department chairman for five years and no one has been chairman for five years since the 1980s to today," said Dr. Wilson.
NEWS
By Eleanor Lee Wells | December 30, 1991
WELL, that does it.Not only have some members of my placid sex become shrieking demagogues -- telling me what I really want, feel, object to, and . . . gulp . . . think, but now we have a group of snazzies in upstate New York who take off their tops in a park (they're called the Topfree 10), and the action is approved by Patricia the Judge, who says their right to equal protection is being violated if they are prevented from gamboling on the green in the buff.Wait a minute! Is this some neo-feminist fringelette out to shock the already-reeling establishment, or have we come to a point in this society where character assassins have taken on the neutering of womanhood?
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | April 7, 2014
Tricia Lige remembers the first thought she had in 2005 when she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis: "I'm going to end up in a wheelchair for the rest of my life. " Now, nine years later, the Knettishall resident will be walking with her entire family and about 40 others on her team, Lige Lightning in her 10th MS Walk Towson at Goucher College on April 13. "For some people, the disease progresses quickly," Lige said. "I have been fortunate to remain stable for the last nine years.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | February 3, 2014
Et cetera Cousins open to trade, but not requesting one Quarterback Kirk Cousins hasn't requested a trade from the Washington Redskins but would welcome the opportunity to go elsewhere and start in the NFL if the opportunity arose, a person with knowledge of the situation said. That stance is the same one Cousins has held since the Redskins selected him in the fourth round of the 2012 draft - the same year that they took Robert Griffin III second overall. ESPN reported Sunday morning that Cousins had informed the Redskins that he was open to being traded.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Franklin Walter Vanik, who became an advocate for those diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, died Friday at his parents' Rosedale home after suffering a head injury in an earlier fall. He was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rosedale, he was the son of Franklin Louis Vanik, a retired Crown Cork and Seal mechanical engineer, and Gertrude M. Vanik, an administrative assistant. He attended Red House Run Elementary School and Holabird Junior High School, where his teachers recognized his academic ability and recommended him for a newly created gifted and talented program.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 19, 2014
Everybody's got something. Maybe it's something you were born with, maybe something that happened to you, maybe something you did to yourself through bad habits or neglect. But everybody's got something, some physical or emotional blemish measuring the distance from you to perfection. Maybe you're a short guy or a gawky woman. Maybe you're ugly. Maybe you've got cellulite, depression, anorexia, alcoholism, gingivitis, psoriasis or a big nose. Maybe you're fat. Gabourey Sidibe is fat. Morbidly obese, to be exact.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
The major news stories over the weekend were all about the 18 people shot and six killed in black-on-black crime in Baltimore, yet there were no words from the mayor or any other city officials. ("Eight killed in bloody weekend," June 24.) When I hear that "crime in Baltimore is down," I wonder if those in city government are just used to lying to everyone or whether they simply don't care. I also wonder whether the public has gotten so used to the violence that they don't care either.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2013
Anna Whetstone, 23, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when she was 17. She was a high school junior in Hershey, Pa., playing on her school's field hockey team when she got hit in the head with a ball. "I was feeling fine at the time," she said, but over the next few days she had trouble with balance and "wasn't feeling well overall. " Computed tomography scans and an MRI discovered the telltale lesions that are signs of the degenerative disease. After the diagnosis, Whetstone switched from playing to coaching field hockey, but she continued dancing and she earned a neuroscience degree, with honors, at Moravian College in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
n May 6, 2006 MS. DORIS ELIZABETH GARNES. On Today, Ms. Garnes will lie in state at Grace Baptist Church, 3201 The Alameda, where the family will receive friends from 1:00 - 8:00 p.m. On Thursday services will be held at Grace Baptist Church, 3201 The Alameda, where the family will receive friends from 10:00 - 10:30 a.m. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-433-7500.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | February 27, 2000
Money, lots of it, was good reason to celebrate at the MS Dinner of Champions. The 13th annual gala at Martin's West pulled in the most money ever -- $400,000 for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Maryland Chapter. The event also featured the presentation of the MS Million Dollar Tiffany Crystal Award to a surprised John Paterakis for raising more than $1.5 million over the years for MS. As he accepted the prize, the H&S Bakery president got another unexpected honor -- a standing ovation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
Jean-Pierre G. Meyer, former professor and chairman of the Johns Hopkins University mathematics department whose escape from Nazi-occupied France became the subject of a children's book, died April 24 of heart failure at his Guilford residence. He was 83. "He was conscientious and really very smart and kind, and that's not always a combination that goes together," said W. Stephen Wilson, a close friend and math department colleague. "He was department chairman for five years and no one has been chairman for five years since the 1980s to today," said Dr. Wilson.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
I'm a big-tent person, you know. Live and let live, I always say. Milk of human kindness by the quart in every vein. No accounting for tastes, so let people enjoy their innocent pleasures. Life's too short, &c., &c.  But my patience is sorely tried by an article at Westword in which one Jenn Wohletz, whom I take, from her vulgar but uninventive prose and untutored taste in drink, to be a young person, disparages the old-fashioned and the martini.  The old-fashioned is a drink for Old People, she says, and it's a pain for the bartender to make, and "when anyone under the age of 65 orders one, they're only doing it to look cool and impress people.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.