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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Staph infections didn't used to cause much of a fuss. They would irritate skin but could easily be treated with antibiotics. Recently, however, antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , have been surfacing. Dr. Robert Ancona, St. Joseph Medical Center's chief of pediatrics and an infectious disease specialist, have been noticing more concerning MRSA infections in children lately. What is the difference between MRSA and other bacterial strains?
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 16, 2013
Living by a hog farm or near crop fields fertilized with the animals' manure can raise your risk of getting a drug-resistant infection, a new study finds. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found a link in Pennsylvania between intensive hog farming and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. In poring over medical records of more than 446,000 Pennsylvanians in the Geisinger Health System , the researchers found 3,000 patients with MRSA and 50,000 with skin and soft-tissue infections from 2005 through 2010.  Of the MRSA cases, 1,539 were community-acquired and 1,335 deemed hospital-acquired.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
For Kerri Cardello McKoy, mother of four, a trip to the hospital to treat a broken nose in 2003 seemed routine. But what followed wasn't: a raging MRSA infection that cost her both legs below the knee, a collapsed lung and four months in a hospital bed, much of it in a drug-induced coma. "When I think about it, it makes me want to cry," she says. Almost five years later, public health officials, hospitals and legislators are still arguing over the best way to curb MRSA, the drug-resistant bug that cost the Annapolis woman her legs and could be killing up to 19,000 people a year nationwide.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
FEATURES
By Janet Cromley | October 25, 2007
These days, the University of Southern California's football players might seem more like fussy disciples of the TV detective Monk than scrappy athletes. They use paper towels on the practice field and at games, and they shower before setting foot in the training room. Their laundry is washed at a constant 140-degree temperature, which is monitored. Portable cold-therapy tubs are drained and cleaned after each use, and the team brings its own soap to away games. That's because while racking up wins in the 2003 and 2004 seasons, the players and trainers also were facing down a different type of adversary - a potential killer known as MRSA, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 16, 2013
Living by a hog farm or near crop fields fertilized with the animals' manure can raise your risk of getting a drug-resistant infection, a new study finds. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found a link in Pennsylvania between intensive hog farming and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. In poring over medical records of more than 446,000 Pennsylvanians in the Geisinger Health System , the researchers found 3,000 patients with MRSA and 50,000 with skin and soft-tissue infections from 2005 through 2010.  Of the MRSA cases, 1,539 were community-acquired and 1,335 deemed hospital-acquired.
HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 2007
CHICAGO -- Illinois is poised to become the first state to require hospitals to implement programs combating a dangerous, drug-resistant bacterium that kills thousands of people in the U.S. each year. Under a bill moving through the Legislature, hospitals would be required to test for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, in all intensive-care and "at-risk" patients, such as those transferred from nursing homes. If it is detected, aggressive measures to prevent transmission would kick in. MRSA is a potentially virulent bacterium that has developed strong defenses against common antibiotics such as penicillin.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 6, 2012
Hospitals aren't the only places where people can pick up a nasty "superbug. " A  University of Maryland -led team of researchers has found methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, at sewage treatment plants in the mid-Atlantic and the Midwest. MRSA is a well-known problem in hospitals, where patients have picked up potentially fatal bacterial infections that do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  But since the late 1990s, it's also been showing up in otherwise healthy people outside of health-care facilities, prompting a search for sources in the wider community.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 25, 2007
As many as 1.2 million hospital patients are infected with dangerous, drug-resistant staph infections each year, almost 10 times more than previous estimates, based on findings from a major new study. And 48,000 to 119,000 hospital patients a year may be dying from methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections, far more than previously thought, the study's data suggest. The Chicago Tribune obtained the results during the weekend from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, which is releasing the report today.
HEALTH
Tim Wheeler | October 11, 2012
Living near a livestock farm may increase your risk of acquiring an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to a new study led by researchers from Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health . In reviewing data from the Netherlands, a team of Hopkins and Dutch scientists found that the odds of being exposed to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, are greatest in the southeast region of that European country, an...
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2012
Much of Johns Hopkins epidemiologist Jason Farley's recent research has focused on an evolving medical crisis: How to stop the spread of bacteria that have adapted immunity to most antibiotics. To stop it the medical community needs to track it. He's found that men recently arrested in Baltimore as well as Hopkins psychiatric patients were far more likely than the general population to be carriers of MRSA, the increasingly common bacteria resistant to many drugs. Now, he's launching a study exploring eradication of MRSA in HIV-positive patients, who, like others with compromised immune systems, are more likely to contract drug-resistant bacterial infections.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Lou Ruth Blake was the family's matriarch who sang in the church choir and organized gospel shows. Lowell Frederick Blake liked to make people laugh. Venessa Marie Blake was the ardent churchgoer with a contagious smile. All three family members died within days of each other earlier this month from complications of the flu — a cluster that state officials acknowledged was unusual. Their deaths caused a stir in the community of Lusby in Calvert County, where Blake family roots run deep in the town of nearly 1,600.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Staph infections didn't used to cause much of a fuss. They would irritate skin but could easily be treated with antibiotics. Recently, however, antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , have been surfacing. Dr. Robert Ancona, St. Joseph Medical Center's chief of pediatrics and an infectious disease specialist, have been noticing more concerning MRSA infections in children lately. What is the difference between MRSA and other bacterial strains?
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 27, 2009
The overall rate of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria has leveled off in Baltimore, but some types of infections remain much higher than in surrounding jurisdictions and statewide, according to data released yesterday by the city Health Department. While rates have declined in hospitals and among intravenous drug users, infections reported at dialysis centers and long-term care facilities have had only modest decreases. Meanwhile, rates among people with HIV are up. City officials pledged to devise better strategies for combating infections caused by invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
Less than a month after the Maryland General Assembly rejected a bill that would have required hospitals to test incoming patients for the dangerous MRSA bacterium, researchers in Switzerland are reporting that screening doesn't reduce MRSA infections. Researchers found that MRSA infection rates in wards where patients were pre-screened for the superbug were no different from infection rates in areas without screening, according to an article in today's Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 27, 2009
The overall rate of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria has leveled off in Baltimore, but some types of infections remain much higher than in surrounding jurisdictions and statewide, according to data released yesterday by the city Health Department. While rates have declined in hospitals and among intravenous drug users, infections reported at dialysis centers and long-term care facilities have had only modest decreases. Meanwhile, rates among people with HIV are up. City officials pledged to devise better strategies for combating infections caused by invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, commonly known as MRSA.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
Two Maryland hospitals will soon begin testing methods to stop the spread of deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a pilot project that could lead to changes in the way health care facilities statewide deal with this stubborn problem. About 120,000 patients in the United States were infected with the bacteria known as MRSA in 2002, according to data from the national Centers for Disease Control. Many hospitals have struggled to prevent infections because the bacteria can pass easily among patients and staff members, and through contact with contaminated equipment.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
For Kerri Cardello McKoy, mother of four, a trip to the hospital to treat a broken nose in 2003 seemed routine. But what followed wasn't: a raging MRSA infection that cost her both legs below the knee, a collapsed lung and four months in a hospital bed, much of it in a drug-induced coma. "When I think about it, it makes me want to cry," she says. Almost five years later, public health officials, hospitals and legislators are still arguing over the best way to curb MRSA, the drug-resistant bug that cost the Annapolis woman her legs and could be killing up to 19,000 people a year nationwide.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 4, 2007
You might want to wash your hands after reading this. After all, many other folks touched this paper (or screen, as the case may be) before you, and you don't know where their hands have been. For all you know, the last person to touch the paper was carrying Entamoeba histolyca, a parasite that causes amebiasis. You could end up with stomach cramps, bloody stools and an abscess on your liver. And that's assuming the disease doesn't spread to your lungs and brain. Or maybe the last person to use the computer recently came into contact with African green monkeys.
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