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Marta H. Mossburg | November 6, 2012
Less than a week before the U.S. election, former president of the USSR Mikhail Gorbachev berated America and all but endorsed the sitting president and fellow Nobel Peace Prize winner at an event I attended in Houston. Speaking last Thursday from a podium built by oil money and introduced by a socialite teetering in a French shoemaker's trademarked red-soled heels, he admonished those in the audience to scrap free enterprise for "sustainability. " Taking a theme from Barack Obama's campaign, Mr. Gorbachev said, "The goals of economic growth should not depend on super profits and overconsumption," to vigorous applause at the Wortham Center as the banners of major oil company arts patrons benignly welcomed visitors in the grand foyer.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Barack Obama had a choice between liberalism and the Democratic Party. He chose the latter and it cost him dearly. Liberalism, as an ideology, insists that government can do good and great things for the people and the world, if the people running the government are smart liberals.The Democratic Party says the exact same thing. But liberalism is an ideal, while the Democratic Party is that ideal's representative here in the real world, and in the real world political parties disappoint.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Mark D. Sokolik, a corporate lawyer remembered as a fitness and music enthusiast, died last week after complications from a fall. He was 30. A former Hunt Valley resident who attended Loyola Blakefield in Towson, Mr. Sokolik went on to graduate from the University of Baltimore and become a top student at Georgetown University's Law Center. Since 2010, he had worked as a corporate attorney at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in New York, one of the nation's top law firms. "Mark was a real gentle person," said Frank Sokolik, his father, whom Mark talked with constantly on the phone.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
Regarding Michael Phelps being pulled over for driving 84 mph in a 45-mph zone ( "Olympian Michael Phelps arrested for drunken driving a second time ," Sept. 30): If Mr. Phelps is sincere when he says he takes "full responsibility" for his actions and that he is "deeply sorry," he can show this dramatically - by voluntarily giving up driving motor vehicles and hiring someone who knows how to do it responsibly. Ernest F. Imhoff, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 1, 2013
After all the thunder and lightning signifying nothing but more Republican obstructionism, former Sen. Chuck Hagel has taken over at the Pentagon, vowing a realistic approach to America's military role in the world. Not surprisingly, he indicated he will pursue President Barack Obama's course of selective engagement, in contrast to the interventionism of the previous Republican administration, although he didn't specifically mention its war of choice in Iraq and other misadventurism.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Franklin W. Littleton Jr., a retired career Air Force officer and a businessman who was a big-band and Dixieland music aficionado, died April 20 of complications from dementia at Nichols Eldercare, an Edgewood assisted-living facility. The Bel Air resident was 91. The son of a contractor and a homemaker, Franklin Walter Littleton Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Clearspring Road in Forest Park. He was a 1939 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and studied law at the University of Baltimore at night while working at Montgomery Ward and the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Charles T. Mahan Jr., who spent 75 years painstakingly documenting the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad — better known as the Ma & Pa — that zig-zagged across Maryland from Baltimore to York, Pa., died Friday of kidney failure at Oak Crest Village. He was 88. "Every fan of the Ma & Pa will be eternally indebted to Charlie. He was a treasure," said Rudy Fischer, archivist of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad Historical Society. "He documented its rolling stock, narrow- and later standard-gauge days.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | April 20, 2013
A plague of locusts swept through Egypt a few weeks ago, an estimated 30 million of the critters. Egyptian officials tried to downplay the phenomenon, hoping to quash any biblical analogies. They noted that locust swarms show up in the spring every now and then. But more earthly indicators suggest that the blighted Egyptian government is in such deep political and economic trouble that perhaps the analogy is apt. Experts and senior government officials worldwide are warning that Egypt's economy is hurtling toward collapse.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
John R. Hebert, a retired mechanical engineer who was vice president of operations at AAI Corp. in Cockeysville, died April 17 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The resident of Phoenix in Baltimore County was 83. John Ray Hebert was born and raised in Port Arthur, Texas, where he graduated from St. Mary's High School. Mr. Hebert earned a bachelor's degree in the early 1950s from Texas A&M University in College Station. He later served in the Army, where he attained the rank of lieutenant.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Philip X. "Phil" Kaltenbach, a former high school English teacher who later became an expert in the field of collectible comic books, died Tuesday at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla., while recovering from foot surgery. He was 63. The son of a Loyola University Maryland dean and a Loyola Blakefield High School administrative assistant, Philip Xavier Kaltenbach was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. Mr. Kaltenbach was a 1967 graduate of Loyola Blakefield and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
I neglected to offer you anything from H.L. Mencken yesterday on his birthday. So today, I will let you judge for yourselves how much this passage from "On Being an American" (1922) rings true today:   "The United States, to my eye, is incomparably the greatest show on earth. It is a show which avoids diligently all the kinds of clowning which tire me most quickly--for example, royal ceremonials, the tedious hocus-pocus of haute politique , the taking of politics seriously--and lays chief stress upon the kinds which delight me unceasingly--for example, the ribald combats of demagogues, the exquisitely ingenious operations of master rogues, the pursuit of witches and heretics, the desperate struggles of inferior men to claw their way into Heaven.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young is expected Tuesday to formally begin the process of finding a replacement for former Councilman William H. Cole IV, who resigned to become head of the Baltimore Development Corporation. Much is at stake for Mr. Cole's district, which encompasses a diverse array of neighborhoods and the city's central business district, but much is also at stake for the council itself to show that it has learned from the debacle that ensued last time it had a vacancy.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Commentator Jonathan David Farley writes that Central American children crossing our borders should be deported immediately ( "#Sendthemback," July 22). I have only written a response to an editorial once before, but I thought I needed to take it upon myself to respond. Being 13, I suppose most adults with Mr. Farley's mindset wouldn't think that a girl my age would know much about the topic or even really care about what's happening at all. But I will tell you this: I'm responding to your letter not to be hurtful or judgmental but only to offer an opposing view.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 16, 2014
The stunning primary loss of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, the first ever suffered by any congressional leader of either party, may well reflect his Virginia constituents' souring toward his personal hubris more than any cosmic policy issue. Mr. Cantor's conspicuous focus on national political aspirations, with himself widely cast as the heir apparent to beleaguered House Speaker John Boehner, obviously didn't sit well with the folks back home. Their votes were a reminder to him of Democratic Speaker Tip O'Neill's old adage that "All politics is local.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Edwin "Ted" William Baker, one of Columbia's original planners and a world traveler whose pursuits included rough-terrain horseback riding, died of a cardiac arrest Tuesday. The Baltimore resident was 77. Mr. Baker grew up in California and earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1959. His two years in the Navy after graduation fueled a lasting love of visiting new places, said his daughter, Caroline S.A. Baker of Baltimore. "He traveled all over in those two years and wrote postcards from all different hemispheres — from Japan and Sydney, Australia, and off the coast of Africa," she said.
NEWS
By Brenda Payne | May 20, 2014
An open letter to Douglas Gansler, attorney general of Maryland and candidate for governor Dear Mr. Gansler: As another school year winds down and I complete my 21 s t year in the Maryland Public School System, I am pondering where I should cast my vote in the upcoming gubernatorial election. It is a difficult choice. I do not need my union to tell me for whom I should vote. I can choose on my own. After your recent ad campaign, I can tell you who will not have my vote: you. I watched the ad on television and laughed at it, even as I shook my head and rolled my eyes.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 12, 2013
Biography isn't policy. President Barack Obama's choice for secretary of defense, Chuck Hagel, former Nebraska Republican senator, has a resume most politicians can envy: a clean senatorial record, no ethical lapses and two Purple Hearts from a war many opposed and many more tried to avoid. Some think Hagel's 2006 comment about "the Jewish lobby" should disqualify him, believing it a code word for anti-Semitic sentiments. There is nothing wrong with criticizing the policies of any Israeli government.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 4, 2013
Vice President Joe Biden, the Republicans' favorite punching bag, gave his critics nothing to laugh about as President Barack Obama's ultimate fireman in rescuing the country from the fiscal cliff it teetered on as 2012 ended. Mr. Biden's 11th-hour entry by partnering once again with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell struck a modest but crisis-postponing deal, raising taxes on the richest Americans but entailing little or no serious debt reduction. It enabled the president to say the middle class had been protected, but it also let the Republicans claim former President George W. Bush finally had finally gotten his way in making his tax cuts permanent.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Mr. Rain's Fun House, the restaurant inside the American Visionary Art Museum, will close on June 7, according to information provided by the restaurant. "Even with wonderful press ... and a series of recognizable achievements ... our pursuit of culinary excellence was not rewarded with the business we expected over the past year," said the statement from the restaurant. Mr. Rain's Fun House opened in 2009. It's owned by the BPM Restaurant Group, which is chef Bill Buszinski and his wife Maria, and their business partner Perez Klebhan.
NEWS
By Steve Gimbel | March 31, 2014
The dawn of the baseball season is an existential moment. For big market teams with owners willing to pay for marquee players, and general managers who build playoff-bound teams, it is a time of great anticipation. It's also a time of hope, albeit dim, for those die-hard fans of teams who are off the playoff pace by double digits year in and year out. Their cautious optimism is one that illuminates the human condition. French philosopher Albert Camus contended that life is absurd, that most of us are like the Greek tragic figure Sisyphus, who was condemned to roll a huge boulder up a mountain, only to have it roll back down as he reached the top. The essence of humanity, Camus argued, is in the moment where Sisyphus turns around to see the boulder once again at the bottom of the hill knowing he must trudge down to his toil once more, aware that this effort will again be both great and futile.
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