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By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1995
Leaders of a union representing clerical and technical workers at the Maryland Port Administration lambasted the agency yesterday for granting bonuses to 22 top executives to reward them for recent increases in business and profitability.Maryland Classified Employees Association officials criticized the MPA for handing out $84,000 in bonuses to managers, while giving only a 2 percent cost-of-living adjustment to the 350 other MPA employees.Port officials, however, defended the bonuses, saying managers were primarily responsible for the recent growth because they negotiated contracts with customers.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
David A. Wagner, former deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Transportation who later headed the Maryland Port Administration, died April 7 of cancer at his home in Mandeville, La. The longtime Pasadena resident was 71. "Dave was a good administrator, and he was a detail guy. He was well liked by his employees and those who worked with him," said Helen Delich Bentley, the former congresswoman and chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission....
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BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | May 11, 1991
Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer says he expects to pick a new port director within three weeks and that management ability rather than experience in the maritime industry is the most important requirement."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
U.S. commerce "would grind to a halt in a matter of days" in the aftermath of a crippling cyberattack that the nation's ports — including Baltimore — are ill-prepared for, according to a new Brookings Institution report. But port officials here and elsewhere dispute the assessment written by Coast Guard Cmdr. Joseph Kramek, who spent a year as a Brookings fellow looking at cybersecurity at six of the nation's busiest waterfronts. The study concluded that failure to bolster defenses against hackers could lead to disruption of the computer networks used to move goods, fuel and food from ships to the marketplace.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | February 10, 1991
With less than two months left before the expiration of Maersk Line's lease in the port of Baltimore, the Maryland Port Administration is trying to persuade Maersk to stay by offering the line something it probably can't get in Virginia -- its own custom-built terminal from which it could offer terminal services to other steamship lines.MPA Executive Director Brendan W. O'Malley said in an interview last week that the state is offering Maersk, the port's most important customer, a deal that would allow Maersk to take advantage of the fact that it operates a stevedoring company as well as a steamship line.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
In yet another effort to make the port of Baltimore more competitive, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday it will not increase rates for steamship lines next year, despite moves by other East Coast ports to do so.The unexpected decision to hold the line on tariffs came just days after Baltimore dockworkers ratified a five-year contract that employers said was critical to retaining business at the struggling port and for attracting new cargo."
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 1, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Brendan W. O'Malley, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, begged state senators yesterday for continued financial support of port projects, but his requests drew a chilly reception."
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | September 6, 1991
Adrian G. Teel, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, announced yesterday a 15 percent reduction in the work force of the port agency as part of a reorganization he hopes will stem the MPA's losses and help the port regain lost business."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
Cargo handled at state-owned terminals rose more than 3 percent during the first quarter this year, continuing a steady growth in business at the port of Baltimore.General cargo climbed to 1,315,675 tons, up 41,709 tons over the same period last year, according to figures released yesterday by the Maryland Port Administration (MPA).The overall increase was attributed largely to a growth in container tonnage and break bulk cargo, such as wood pulp. In March alone, cargo rose by 500,000 tons at the state's five public terminals, the largest year-to-year monthly increase in several years, port officials said.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | October 7, 1992
An Israeli shipping line has begun service between Baltimore and South America, in a move that Maryland Port Administration officials contend shows that the port of Baltimore is continuing to gain ground slowly in spite of the recession.Zim Israel Navigation Co. Ltd. of Haifa, Israel, will provide service every two weeks to the South Locust Point Marine Terminal, connecting Baltimore to ports in Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil and Uruguay, the MPA said yesterday at its board meeting in the World Trade Center.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 17, 2008
The Maryland Port Administration is pushing a $2.5 million land acquisition deal that would double the size of the parking lot at its South Locust Point cruise terminal. The move comes as Baltimore readies itself to become a year-round cruise port when behemoth Carnival Cruise Lines begins weekly sailings in September next year that are expected to handle 115,000 passengers a year. After a four-year hiatus, Norwegian Cruise Lines returns to Baltimore on Saturday with a seasonal schedule to Bermuda, signaling that the lagging local industry is on the rebound.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
More than six weeks after a Maryland Port Administration maintenance supervisor died of massive head injuries suffered at work, police and port officials have yet to settle on an explanation for a fatal incident that was not promptly reported to law enforcement officers and paramedics. Robert Benway, 45, was rushed to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in a truck by co-workers June 26 with injuries they said he suffered in a fall from a ladder at the all-but-deserted Clinton Street Marine Terminal.
BUSINESS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2005
Former Maryland Rep. Helen Delich Bentley and public and private maritime officials urged the state House of Delegates yesterday to reject a bill that would give the port of Baltimore greater autonomy in favor of a slower approach to changing oversight of the facility. Bentley told the House Environmental Matters Committee that she has been advocating for a more independent, business-like port for a half-century but believes that can be accomplished without moving it from under the authority of the state Department of Transportation, which the bill would do. "Something needs to be done," Bentley said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
James J. White, who left the port of Baltimore because of political tension with his new bosses in the Ehrlich administration, began a new job yesterday in New Jersey with a company that does business with about a dozen U.S. ports, including Baltimore's. White became senior vice president and chief operating officer of the Weehawken, N.J.-based stevedoring and terminal operating company Ceres Terminals Inc. The move eases the fears of some in Baltimore's maritime industry who thought White might take his reputation and contacts to a competing port.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
A veteran administrator at the port of Baltimore was named yesterday to lead it on an interim basis while state officials seek a replacement for the outgoing executive director, who clashed with his boss in the Ehrlich administration. M. Kathleen Broadwater, deputy executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, will step in after James J. White ends his six-year tenure Friday. The announcement was made yesterday in a joint statement from White and his boss, Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
Citing Baltimore's acute need for drug rehabilitation services, a federal judge has rejected efforts by the Maryland Port Administration to delay signing a berth agreement that would allow a nonprofit group to open a recovery program aboard a former Navy ship. With the ruling by U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson in hand, leaders of Project Life Inc. plan to sign and deliver to state officials today a lease that would mark the end of a messy, three-year legal battle over where and whether the group could launch its shipboard program for drug-addicted women.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
More than six weeks after a Maryland Port Administration maintenance supervisor died of massive head injuries suffered at work, police and port officials have yet to settle on an explanation for a fatal incident that was not promptly reported to law enforcement officers and paramedics. Robert Benway, 45, was rushed to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in a truck by co-workers June 26 with injuries they said he suffered in a fall from a ladder at the all-but-deserted Clinton Street Marine Terminal.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1998
In an effort to become more competitive in an increasingly cutthroat maritime industry, the Maryland Port Administration is seeking legislative approval to bypass the state's merit system and increase the salaries of its top officials.The proposed measure -- which has the backing of port labor and business leaders -- would allow the Maryland Port Commission to set the salaries for MPA employees as it did prior to 1996.State Transportation Secretary David L. Winstead told a House of Delegates committee yesterday that the 6 percent ceiling on salary increases for all state Department of Transportation employees makes it increasingly difficult to attract and retain top candidates at the port agency.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2000
Ford Motor Co. has agreed to move an additional 33,300 or more cars through the port of Baltimore beginning next year as part of an agreement struck with the Maryland Port Administration and the port's largest vehicle processing company, state officials said yesterday. Amports, a subsidiary of London-based Associated British Ports PLC, won the contract to handle the Ford line of vehicles, which includes everything from sport utility vehicles to luxury Volvo automobiles. Details of the agreement are still being worked out, but state officials say the world's second-largest car manufacturer could move as many as 288,000 Ford and Volvo cars through the port over the course of the proposed three-year contract.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
The port of Baltimore's largest marine terminal operator, ITO Corp., will be purchased today by P&O Ports, an international port management conglomerate making its first investment in the U.S. shipping trade.The deal will transfer one of the port's largest employers to foreign ownership, but is not expected to prompt any immediate changes in ITO's Baltimore operations.The company employs several dozen people in administrative positions in Baltimore, and creates much of the work for the city's unionized Longshoremen.
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