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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 10, 2000
The good news is that neophytes and propeller heads alike can buy Music Match Jukebox in stores without the hassle of downloading it and paying online by credit card, something that many are reluctant to do. Then, with this superb MP3 music player loaded, you can seek out thousands of music titles available on the Web or take your own CDs and convert them to computer files using the Fraunhofer MP3 compression software. Included is a 6-foot cord that will pump music out through the computer's own speakers or a dedicated music system.
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NEWS
by Carson Porter | June 28, 2011
Click here for instructions on how to redeem your $2 credit.  And here is their 69 cent special track store. 
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NEWS
January 31, 2000
The Boston Globe said in an editorial last week: The ink is barely dry on the largest merger agreement in US history and already one of the partners -- Time Warner -- is planning another one. Its $20 billion marriage with Britain's EMI, a music publishing company representing top acts from the Rolling Stones to the Spice Girls, has serious implications for art as well as business. Consolidation in the music industry -- as in filmmaking, publishing, and other fields -- is accelerating.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
MP3Car.com used to be the right name for the Baltimore company. Not anymore. The company traces its roots to a worldwide online community of geeks in the 1990s who installed personal computers filled with electronic music files, or MP3s, in their cars. But, like many startup companies that surprisingly grew their business in a different direction, MP3Car.com is now struggling to choose a new name that signals what it does well: build sophisticated mobile computers for corporate and government clients.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,sun staff sun staff | January 4, 1999
Want to turn your PC into a digital jukebox?To put your compact disk collection onto your hard drive, you'll need three programs: a ripper, an encoder and a player.A ripper pulls songs off your CDs and converts them to industry standard .WAV files (the kind Windows uses for sound effects). An encoder compresses the .WAV files into MP3 format. Finally, a player transforms the MP3 file back into Frank Zappa.If you want to keep life simple, try MusicMatch's Jukebox, a $30 shareware program that can handle all three chores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 2002
I record oral histories on mini discs, and now need to get those interviews onto my computer. I have a USB link for my Sony Mini Disc that allows me to download from the computer, but it doesn't say how to load them to it. MusicMatch (www.musicmatch.com), which competes against Real Networks and Microsoft's Media Player as a music player and CD burner, boasts a well-documented feature that walks users through the process of using the Line-In port on a computer sound card to record music from a turntable or external CD player as MP3 files.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2000
Multimedia player for PDA still rough around the edges The expansion slot on Handspring's Visor opens up unlimited options for the personal digital assistant. First with a pop-in multimedia player is Innogear. Its MiniJam enables the Visor to play MP3 and other files while the handheld computer functions as an organizer. With a multimedia card, users can switch out playlists of files. The MiniJam can display an electronic book or present a slide show of photos, capabilities beyond what you'd find on standard MP3 players.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | August 8, 2002
IT'S HARD to get excited over a headline that reads, "Xiph.org Releases Ogg Vorbis." In fact, you might suspect that whoever typed it had one hand on the wrong row of the keyboard. But if you've ever played a digital music file on your computer, Ogg Vorbis is big news. Technically, it's the name of a new format for storing and transmitting digital audio. If you troll the Internet looking for music, you'll soon find files with the extension OGG, in addition to the familiar MP3 and WMA formats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | July 5, 1999
This week could mark the biggest upheaval in the music industry since the introduction of vinyl. A coalition of the world's largest record labels and technology companies is expected to endorse a blueprint for taking the music industry from the discs that have delivered music for the past century to electronic bits delivered online. What's at stake? Nothing less than how you'll buy, listen to and record your favorite tunes in the years to come. And you'll start seeing evidence of the music industry's new score as soon as Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2000
Lansonic device offers flexibility for MP3 playback Lansonic's DAS-750 is designed as a link between a stereo system and a computer network. Like a home entertainment component in appearance, the $995 DAS-750 has a 20-gigabyte internal hard drive that can store about 345 hours of MP3-encoded music. But MP3 storage is just part of what the DAS-750 has to offer. It has a built-in Ethernet adapter that allows this digital audio server to join a network. Once connected, the DAS-750 can play MP3s from other computers' shared folders or copy the files to its hard drive.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 29, 2009
MP3Car.com used to be the right name for the Baltimore company. Not anymore. The company traces its roots to a worldwide online community of geeks in the 1990s who installed personal computers filled with electronic music files, or MP3s, in their cars. But, like many startup companies that surprisingly grew their business in a different direction, MP3Car.com is now struggling to choose a new name that signals what it does well: build sophisticated mobile computers for corporate and government clients.
TRAVEL
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 22, 2009
Down just about every ancient street in Italy's Rome and Florence were weedy ruins or majestic churches or the former homesteads of aristocratic families. Often the narrow streets lead to open squares, or piazzas, as well as markets, artists' enclaves and fountains. But who could tell one stony gray treasure from another? What my husband and I needed on a recent offseason visit to Italy was a guide. But not the kind of guide that would require us to board buses or herd en masse behind him. We're too independent for that.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 4, 2007
Like a few zillion other customers, I happily log onto Apple's online music store from time to time to exchange a few dollars for a handful of album tracks - sometimes a whole album or two. I don't begrudge Apple a penny of the money I've spent through iTunes. My gripe is with digital rights management (DRM) - the industry's euphemism for copy protection. This is a digital lock that limits the devices on which I can play most iTunes music to a handful of computers and Apple's own iPod portable players.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | August 26, 2007
With all these new gadgets for listening to music -- from MP3s to state-of-the-art cell phones and laptops, not to mention satellite radio -- it's a wonder anyone is listening to good old-fashioned terrestrial radio. One theory says that so many listeners are spending money on newfangled technology that the ones left tuning in to terrestrial radio are doing so only because they can't afford the new toys. "Because of satellite radio, more affluent people are going to use that service, so we have a smaller piece of the pie to slice up with the people remaining, who are not so affluent," said Bob Pettit, general manager of WCBM, the Baltimore talk-radio station at 680 AM. "The younger people are going to the new technologies.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 27, 2006
Over the two decades that I've been writing about personal technology, I can't think of a more successful gadget than the iPod. Since it appeared four years ago, Apple Computer has sold 58 million of them in various shapes and sizes and now has 60 percent to 70 percent of the market. With that kind of money and clout at stake, it's surprising that Microsoft has taken this long to take on the iPod. After all, the company has a history of muscling the early leaders out of any race it eventually decides to enter.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
In its first 100 years, commercial radio fended off television, record players and the early days of the Internet. Now, with new gadgets such as satellite radios and MP3 players enabling consumers to decide what to hear and when to hear it, conventional radio might be facing its most formidable competition ever. Tomorrow, when shock-jock titan Howard Stern exits earthbound radio for the burgeoning world of satellite next month, he leaves behind a medium whose audience is spending 17 percent less time listening than it did in 1993.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | August 5, 2004
Key014 perfect for music on the move Wearable MP3 players have been the rage for years now, but many of them that carry a significant amount of music have seemed a bit bulky to me. I don't mind bulky because I haven't been getting nearly enough exercise - which means that nine times out of 10, I'm sitting down somewhere listening to the player. But if you're really interested in an MP3 player that you can wear easily on a hike through the woods (to block out all that nature and silence)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2000
Millions of listeners are now using their PCs as music players, thanks to MP3 technology that makes it easy to store thousands of songs on a hard drive. Unfortunately, they're stuck with the low-grade, 10-watt speakers that come with most computers. But that's changing. If you have a home network installed - either with traditional Category 5 wiring or the hot new HomePNA phone line technology - you can use the high-powered speakers of your living-room stereo to play music from your PC. The Dell Digital Audio Receiver does the work.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Eric Strassman's holiday shopping list used to include more toys, sweaters and jewelry than any electronics gear. Now, technology plays a bigger part - making up half of his shopping list, thanks to lower prices and more choices. "Buying a camera 10 years ago, you had one choice. You bought the instant camera or the 35 mm. Now you have the digital," said Strassman, who lives in Lutherville. "If you wanted audio equipment, you either bought a cheap stereo or expensive stereo. Now, you have MP3 players and iPods."
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID COLKER | October 6, 2005
In the name of convergence -- the effort to combine as many functions as possible into a single hand-held gadget -- some cell phones that already do e-mail, take pictures and play video clips now sport music players. Palm Inc. put one in its Treo 650 that came out in 2004, and Sony Ericsson put an official Walkman phone on the market this year. Most notably, Motorola Inc. recently debuted its Rokr E1 phone designed to play music downloaded from Apple Computer Inc.'s hugely popular iTunes organizer.
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