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NEWS
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
Remember when mozzarella meant a brownish-yellow cheese that was low-moisture rubbery? A firm, cut-it-with-a-sharp-blade lasagna ingredient? Thanks to cheese pioneers such as Paula Lambert, now fresh mozzarella cozies up next to cheddar and Jack in the marketplace. Its soft texture and bedsheet-white appearance have become commonplace, sold refrigerated floating in whey-and-water baths in small plastic tubs. Twisted into braids, balls or knots, fresh mozzarella has musical, polysyllabic names like bocconcini, ovolini and ciliegini.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Verde Pizza Napoletana is a family establishment. But don't let that scare you. You won't find arcade games, or even crayons, in the Canton eatery, which opened in September in the former Birches space. You will find good Neapolitan pizza, helpful service and — yes — kids. After 7 on a recent Friday night, the place was busy, though not packed. Despite the highchairs posted at tables both inside and out, the vibe was urban-cool, with reclaimed wood and exposed brick walls and a sparkling white open kitchen.
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NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
For many centuries, the names of Anthony and Cleopatra have provided food for thought. Those with an historical bent can chew over what role the Egyptian queen played in Rome's decline. The literary may savor retellings of their doomed romance by Shakespeare, Dryden and Shaw. And, for those with campier tastes, there are Liz and Dick, and their magnificent mess of a movie that nearly bankrupted 20th Century Fox in 1963. Whatever your appetite, however, Anthony and Cleopatra probably haven't conjured images of cheese.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Sotto Sopra has a tantalizing restarurant week menu, I think. Take a look. Essentiallly, it's the regular Sotto Sopra menu but I like how Riccardo Bosio has figured out a way to keep on a few of the higher-ticket items without sacrifcing quality -- simply charge a premium for them. How was opening weekend for Summer Restaurant Week. I was in Pittsburgh, where they've never heard of restaurant week.  I did hear from a reader who had a bad RW experience, complete with last-minute switcheroos and hot-house tomatoes.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 1996
From the isle of Capri off the coast of southern Italy comes a fresh mozzarella cheese so mild and velvety that once you've sampled it, you want to devour it at every meal.Also from that area of the Amalfi coast comes a style of pizza so divinely simple that the pure flavors shine.Here is a pizza inspired by my recent travels to that region.To accompany the pizza, serve a "quick-cut" Italian vegetable soup. If you use a canned soup, add some fresh or frozen Italian-style vegetables, such as Italian style green beans or sliced zucchini.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 12, 2001
Every summer our calendar is usually marked with weekend after weekend of family or friends coming to visit us in New England. This year, though, since we have been living and working in Paris in a small apartment, the tables have been turned, and we have been asked to be week- end guests ourselves. Several thoughtful friends have invited us to come for weekends in the French countryside. During these visits I have been impressed by the ease and simplicity with which our hosts have entertained us, especially at the table.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | July 21, 1999
To celebrate its 100th anniversary, Pollio Dairy Products has created a quick recipe featuring the company's Polly-O ricotta and mozzarella. Other brands of cheese should work as well.Speedy Skillet PastaServes 4 to 61 pound ground beef1 (28-ounce) jar spaghetti sauce2 cups water3 cups pasta, uncooked1 (15-ounce) container ricotta cheese2 cups (8 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheeseBrown meat in large skillet until cooked through. Drain off excess fat.Stir in spaghetti sauce and 2 cups water and bring to boil.
NEWS
December 2, 1993
An incorrect baking time was given in the recipe for Spaghetti Pie in yesterday's A La Carte section. The pie should be baked, uncovered, for 25 minutes, then baked for 5 more minutes after the shredded mozzarella is added.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | January 29, 2006
An upscale sandwich-shop favorite works well in home kitchens, too, thanks to the ready availability of good sourdough bread in many supermarket bakeries. For variety, substitute goat cheese for mozzarella, and fresh tomatoes in season. Look for prepared pesto sauces in the deli. If possible, use vacuum-packed sun-dried tomatoes rather than dried or oil-packed; they're soft enough to eat from the bag without rehydrating, and there's no excess oil. A bonus: They're already sliced into slivers and ready to use. MOZZARELLA WITH PESTO AND SUN-DRIED TOMATO SANDWICH Makes 1 sandwich Total time: 5 minutes 2 teaspoons reduced-fat mayonnaise 2 slices sourdough bread 1 (3 / 4-ounce)
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
Sascha's 527 The Evergreen 501 W. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore -- 410-235-8118 Hours --6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --5-10 minutes Ready in --10 minutes The Caprese Panini with turkey, $8.30, had plenty of meat, pesto on both bread slices, crisp tomatoes and oozy, melted mozzarella cheese. Just thinking about ordering it again made our mouths water. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 2, 2011
Food Network Magazine's editors set out six months ago to find the best pizzas in America and now, in the September issue, they reveal the winners. Among the 50 best pies in the country: the Flag Pizza from Baltimore's Joe Squared. The winning picks in Food Network Magazine's “50 States, 50 Pizzas” challenge were crowned after a six-month search for the must-try pie in every state. For the full story, pick up the magazine's September issue, on newsstands Aug. 9. Back in April 2009, when Food Network Magazine did the same thing with burgers , Elizabeth Large found out that Baltimore Magazine 's Suzanne Loudermilk helped narrow the editor's choices down to five semifinalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 9, 2011
A ctor Chazz Palminteri (“The Usual Suspects,” “A Bronx Tale”) has partnered with Aldo’s owners Sergio and Alessandro Vitale to open a new restaurant in Harbor East called Chazz: A Bronx Original. With its soft opening Friday, Palminteri’s restaurant is styled after the eateries on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx and will feature classic Italian-American dishes. Palminteri sat down with b to discuss his restaurant, movies, the mafia and the proper way to eat a slice of pizza.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
Buffalo taste, Polly-O budget. I don't know about you, but this recession has done nothing to curb my appetite for fancy cheese, just my ability to buy it. So I set out to make the stuff at home. That explains why I soon found myself pouring curdled milk into an old pillowcase, on purpose. Dialing up the cheese-making equivalent of the Butterball Turkey hot line. And, eventually, eating some very good and not-so-good cheese. "You make a lot of bad cheese before you make good cheese," Kate Dallam, owner of Broom's Bloom Dairy in Bel Air, said when I'd consulted her at the outset.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2009
There was another brick-oven pizza joint on the same corner spot in Little Italy where Isabella's is now. That place was good, but Isabella's, open now for 2 1/2 years, is better. I'm sorry I hadn't made it there sooner. The truth is that there's a good range of eating choices in Little Italy, from unpretentious family fare to high cuisine, and Isabella's occupies its own niche. Isabella's is the kind of order-at-the-counter joint you'd drop into a couple of times a week to order a pizza or a good sandwich.
NEWS
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,McClatchy-Tribune | November 21, 2007
Remember when mozzarella meant a brownish-yellow cheese that was low-moisture rubbery? A firm, cut-it-with-a-sharp-blade lasagna ingredient? Thanks to cheese pioneers such as Paula Lambert, now fresh mozzarella cozies up next to cheddar and Jack in the marketplace. Its soft texture and bedsheet-white appearance have become commonplace, sold refrigerated floating in whey-and-water baths in small plastic tubs. Twisted into braids, balls or knots, fresh mozzarella has musical, polysyllabic names like bocconcini, ovolini and ciliegini.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 28, 2007
It is back-to-school time for the college set, and plenty of parents, who will miss their kids like crazy in less than a week, are glad to have their bathrooms and their car keys back. Not to mention a good night's sleep. Me? I can't wait to get the refrigerator back. My daughter, Jessie, the budding foodie, has been home for the summer working two jobs. But the hunger such a workload might trigger isn't the reason my sink is always filled with dirty dishes. The child doesn't eat much, but she cooks like crazy.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 2007
An abundance of leftovers from a weekend dinner party led to this pasta dish on a Monday. It came out well enough to scribble down the steps and save the recipe for the future. Some leftover chicken breast and the sauce it was cooked in started things off. Shredding the meat lends a more pleasant texture than cubing. The recipe calls for broth instead of the sauce. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Menu Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Arugula salad with shaved parmesan Lemon ice with butter cookies Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Serves 4 -- Total time: 32 minutes 1 1/2 cups shelled edamame 8 ounces fettuccine 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1 can (14 1/2 ounces)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
Every neighborhood ought to have a little Italian restaurant, the kind of place that offers rib-sticking, tomato-sauce-drenched comfort food in comfortable surroundings. Italian Bistro in Carney is just that sort of place. The food is good, the entrees less than $15 and the service cheerful. But what makes Bistro distinctive is its decor, particularly a glorious mural that looks as though it's been lifted off the walls of a Pompeian ruin. Forget for a moment that the guy at the adjacent table is wearing jeans and a Ravens cap; instead, focus on the toga-clad Romans gliding across the wall, and you're a long, long way from modern-day Carney, hon. Owner Carlo Schiattarella understands the extra oomph that the mural gives Bistro, so he's commissioned another in the new dining area he's building in the back.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 2007
An abundance of leftovers from a weekend dinner party led to this pasta dish on a Monday. It came out well enough to scribble down the steps and save the recipe for the future. Some leftover chicken breast and the sauce it was cooked in started things off. Shredding the meat lends a more pleasant texture than cubing. The recipe calls for broth instead of the sauce. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Menu Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Arugula salad with shaved parmesan Lemon ice with butter cookies Fettuccine With Edamame, Chicken and Mozzarella Serves 4 -- Total time: 32 minutes 1 1/2 cups shelled edamame 8 ounces fettuccine 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1 can (14 1/2 ounces)
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
Sascha's 527 The Evergreen 501 W. Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore -- 410-235-8118 Hours --6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --5-10 minutes Ready in --10 minutes The Caprese Panini with turkey, $8.30, had plenty of meat, pesto on both bread slices, crisp tomatoes and oozy, melted mozzarella cheese. Just thinking about ordering it again made our mouths water. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
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