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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Police in the Baltimore area increased patrols around movie theaters, and local theater owners added security precautions - including banning face masks and fake weapons - after the mass shooting early Friday in suburban Denver sparked fears of copycat attacks. The shooting rampage at a midnight showing of"The Dark Knight Rises"in Aurora, Colo., shattered the perception of safety in yet another public place in a nation that has seen attacks at schools, shopping centers and workplaces.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A six-screen, 752-seat theater showing first-run discounted movies will open in mid-November in the Sun Valley Shopping Center in Glen Burnie. The Sun Valley 6 is under construction as part of the remodeling of the center at the intersection of Mountain Road and Baltimore Annapolis Boulevard, said Ira Miller, president of Sun Valley Movie Theaters Inc., on Tuesday. Sun Valley will feature stadium seating, surround sound and 3-D capability in two large and four smaller theaters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
With today's opening of a 15-screen Cinemark theater in Towson, Baltimore and its immediate area - that is, within the Beltway - is home to nearly 60 movie screens. And 20 of those are in the city itself. That's not bad when one considers that as recently as 12 years ago, there were exactly two movie theaters, with six screens, operating within city limits. Industry analysts say that growth suggests big movie chains such as Cinemark, Landmark and Cobb, all of which have or are planning theaters in the area, believe that Baltimore's moviegoers want to see more movies in more modern theaters and that the local economy is strong enough to support the additional screens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
With today's opening of a 15-screen Cinemark theater in Towson, Baltimore and its immediate area - that is, within the Beltway - is home to nearly 60 movie screens. And 20 of those are in the city itself. That's not bad when one considers that as recently as 12 years ago, there were exactly two movie theaters, with six screens, operating within city limits. Industry analysts say that growth suggests big movie chains such as Cinemark, Landmark and Cobb, all of which have or are planning theaters in the area, believe that Baltimore's moviegoers want to see more movies in more modern theaters and that the local economy is strong enough to support the additional screens.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 20, 2012
The shooting rampage at a movie theater in Colorado that killed 12 and injured more than 50 is enough to make adults uneasy. Many forget that it can have just as deep of an effect on children. Psychologist Tiffany Garner said there are ways parents can help ease children's fears.  The coordinator of autism assessment services  in the division of pediatric psychology & neuropsychology atMt. Washington Pediatric Hospital offers her tips below. How can an event like this impact children?
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- "And now a word from our sponsors. . . ."If Delegate Paul G. Pinsky, D-Prince George's, has his way, moviegoers may be spared the questionable pleasure of hearing those words within the sanctuary of the cinema.Mr. Pinsky's bill, debated before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, would make Maryland the first state to "draw a line in the sand," as Mr. Pinsky put it, beyond which advertisers may not tread.The bill would prohibit commercial advertising in movie theaters, unless the advertised product is being sold at the refreshment counter.
NEWS
By Paul Singer and Paul Singer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - When Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry character sneered, "Go ahead - make my day," the line became such a cultural phenomenon that President Ronald Reagan repeated it in daring Congress to pass a tax increase he could veto. But John Stanton and millions of other deaf Americans did not recognize the reference. The line comes from a 1983 movie that - like virtually all other American movies released since the end of the silent film era - had no subtitles or captions for the hearing-impaired.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1998
GRAPEVINE, Texas -- The web of highways between Dallas and Forth Worth glows with enough strip mall and fast-food neon to make Maryland's Ritchie Highway envious.The two rapidly growing cities have spread outward so that their suburbs overlap, creating what Texans call the "Metroplex" -- a hot dog-shaped metropolis with dual anchors 30 miles apart and, cradled inside the bun, more people (5 million) than than are found in 31 entire states.This Dallas-Fort Worth swath of humanity is also home to the nation's third-largest movie-viewing population, behind Los Angeles and New York.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 27, 2006
Irwin Robert Cohen, an attorney who owned a chain of movie theaters and had been in the entertainment business for more than seven decades, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Thursday at the Jewish Convalescent and Nursing Home. The Pikesville resident was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised near Druid Hill Park, he got into the movie exhibition business at the age of 8, when his father began running the old Leader Theater on South Broadway. "My husband started watching the back door so no one could sneak in," said his wife of 56 years, the former Betty Wagner.
EXPLORE
October 18, 2011
I heartily agree with a fellow Columbia resident who wrote recently about films that do not come to our theaters here in Columbia. If my husband and I don't go to Baltimore to see foreign and independent films, we wait for Netflix to offer them on DVD. How great it would be if our movie theaters showed movies outside the mainstream pop culture! I believe there are many people here that would support these types of films. Kathy Guerin Owen Brown
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
The eight-screen movie complex at Glen Burnie's Marley Station mall, closed since February, will re-open later this year under the management of Horizons Cinemas, which also operates the four-screen Rotunda Cinemas, eight-screen Beltway Movies and two-screen Pikes Theatre. Ira Miller, owner of Horizons Cinemas, said he hopes to have the Marley Station Movies 8 open by early June. His plans for the theaters, which have a combined seating capacity of about 2,000, include new seats and draperies, along with new digital projection equipment, Miller said.
FEATURES
By Jaclyn Peiser and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Men's Journal magazine thinks very highly of Baltimore's Senator Theatre. It is included in its rundown of  the world's top 20 movie theaters.   The Baltimore landmark has been around for 75 years and has hosted film premieres from native sons John Waters and Barry Levinson.   Men's Journal explained that the theater "still maintains much of its history charm (including its original terrazzo floors in the lobby, and it has been cited by many individuals and organizations - including National Trust for Historic Preservation - as the country's quintessential independent theaters.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
The run of the city's last adult movie theater finished last month and the 672-seat venue in Upper Fells Point is now available for rent. The Apex, which showed pornographic films in the building for more than four decades, stopped screenings Nov. 31, said Sukhvir Singh, who bought the South Broadway theater at auction in October for $295,000. Singh, who said he owns about 10 properties in the city, said he has no immediate plans to renovate or sell the property. He liked its location and had hoped to collect money by renting it, he said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
A curtain is falling on the era of X-rated movie theaters in Baltimore with the city's last adult movie house up for auction next week. The Apex, which has shown pornographic films in a squat two-story brick building in Upper Fells Point for more than four decades, might go cheaply and will likely be redeveloped. Andy Billig, of A.J. Billig and Co. Auctioneers, said the building "is in need of renovation" and that its owners are intent on letting it go. The theater achieved a kind of landmark status with the help of its best-known cheerleader, Baltimore filmmaker John Waters.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet today with the family of a Frederick man with Down Syndrome who died in law enforcement custody earlier this year. "The governor wants to make every effort to ensure this never happens to a Marylander again," said Takirra Winfield, a spokeswoman for O'Malley. Robert "Ethan" Saylor, 26, died Jan. 12 after a struggle with off-duty Frederick County sheriff's deputies who were attempting to remove him from a Frederick movie theater. Saylor had finished watching Zero Dark Thirty but tried to stay in the theater to watch it a second time without a ticket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 29, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- Marvel Productions will produce cartoons for movie theaters that will be shown prior to Twentieth Century Fox releases, the two companies said.The studio said that the cartoons, to be called "Fox Toons," should be ready for Fox summer movies in 1991.The studio's deal with Marvel follows a similar effort by Walt Disney Co., which has packaged Roger Rabbit cartoons with "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" and "Dick Tracy."The company did not say how many cartoons Marvel will produce. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Fox said that it will retain rights to the cartoons after Marvel delivers them.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- "Citizen Kane," considered by many critics to be the greatest American film, will be reissued for commercial theatrical release on May 1, exactly 50 years after it was first shown in movie theaters.The film, the story of a newspaper tycoon's rise to wealth and power, was directed, written and produced by Orson Welles, then 25 years old, who also starred as the publisher, Charles Foster Kane.Though widely seen on television and in film school courses, "Citizen Kane" has not been given an unlimited run in movie theaters in more than 30 years, said executives at Paramount Pictures and Turner Entertainment Co., which are releasing the film.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Three Frederick County sheriff's deputies will not be held criminally responsible in the death of a developmentally disabled man at a movie theater in January, prosecutors said Friday. A grand jury declined to indict the three deputies, who were attempting to remove 25-year-old Robert Ethan Saylor from the Theater 9 Westview Cinemas in Frederick when he suffocated Jan. 12, the Frederick County state's attorney's office said. Saylor, who had Down syndrome, died later at a local hospital.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
The movie was over, but Robert Ethan Saylor refused to leave the theater. Soon after the developmentally disabled Frederick man was handcuffed by three off-duty sheriff's deputies, he was dead. The unexplained death last month of Saylor, 26, who had Down syndrome, has thrust the Frederick County sheriff's office into the national spotlight, opening a debate over police treatment of people with mental disabilities. "With proper training, these officers would have realized there was a better way to work with Robert," said Kate Fialkowski, executive director of the Arc of Maryland, an advocacy group for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
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