Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMovie Camera
IN THE NEWS

Movie Camera

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
We need conscious people, not an unconscious mass, ready to yield to any suggestion. Long live the consciousness of the pure who can see and hear! Down with the scented veil of kisses, murders, doves and conjuring tricks! - Dziga Vertov Dziga Vertov - my hero. That's the reaction I have whenever I watch Vertov's silent Soviet masterpiece, The Man With a Movie Camera (1929) - especially with the score by the amazing, three-man Alloy Orchestra that accompanies the film on the print to be shown tonight at the Walters Art Museum.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
Long live the consciousness of the pure who can see and hear! That ringing statement by pioneer Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov articulates my strongest feeling whenever I watch his silent masterpiece, The Man With the Movie Camera (1929), with a score performed live by the amazing three-man Alloy Orchestra. Attending The Man With the Movie Camera with a crowd alive to every joke and nuance brings home what great movies can do - not just clear the palate but foment a revolution in public taste.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
Long live the consciousness of the pure who can see and hear! That ringing statement by pioneer Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov articulates my strongest feeling whenever I watch his silent masterpiece, The Man With the Movie Camera (1929), with a score performed live by the amazing three-man Alloy Orchestra. Attending The Man With the Movie Camera with a crowd alive to every joke and nuance brings home what great movies can do - not just clear the palate but foment a revolution in public taste.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Movies featuring a bunch of profoundly disturbed people dominate today's TV schedule. What better way to celebrate the Saturday before Halloween? That most messed-up of mama's boys, Norman Bates, gets to show off his prowess with a knife in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece of horror, suspense and misdirection, Psycho (8 p.m., TCM). The 1960 film, made cheap and fast by the unit that worked with Hitchcock on his television show, packs more surprises than a truckload of Cracker Jacks. But often overlooked is the mastery of Anthony Perkins' performance as Norman.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 10, 2000
I ONCE DREADED the ordeal of the home movie camera, but I've come to appreciate its power. Sometime in the middle 1950s, my parents acquired a camera and light bar from Service Photo, a Greenmount Avenue store that had a candy jar with free samples. From that day forward, we were good customers. The camera -- I think we tortured two models -- became a guest at all the requisite family events, the Christmas mornings, the snow storms, the First Communions and family outings. It's all pretty tame stuff, interesting only if you knew the cast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
For years, Charles J. Cignatta's "office" was the cockpit of chase planes high over the Chesapeake Bay, where he filmed the dips and rolls of aircraft going through their paces after emerging from the Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.Mr. Cignatta, who spent a nearly five-decade career with the manufacturer of airplanes and spacecraft, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Franklin Woods Center-Genesis Eldercare. The Essex resident was 85.Armed with his heavy Speed Graphic or Aeroflex movie camera, Mr. Cignatta photographed Martin Co. projects, from World War II-era bombers and seaplanes to jets and missiles and even the installation of a nuclear power plant at the South Pole.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
Movies featuring a bunch of profoundly disturbed people dominate today's TV schedule. What better way to celebrate the Saturday before Halloween? That most messed-up of mama's boys, Norman Bates, gets to show off his prowess with a knife in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece of horror, suspense and misdirection, Psycho (8 p.m., TCM). The 1960 film, made cheap and fast by the unit that worked with Hitchcock on his television show, packs more surprises than a truckload of Cracker Jacks. But often overlooked is the mastery of Anthony Perkins' performance as Norman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 18, 1994
Maybe it's your brother-in-law or someone in the office. Maybe it's someone in the car pool or someone who's dating your daughter. But it's someone: A person who considers him- or herself intrinsically more interesting than you, whose life is so much more fascinating than yours, whose wit so much more powerful, and who seizes every second of every day to narrate their latest adventures.Uck. Terrible, no?Now imagine two of them -- with a movie camera -- and you have some idea of the horrors that lurk within "My Life's in Turnaround," which is one half of the double bill at the Charles this week, and a movie so piercingly vain it makes mere narcissism seem like strength of character.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
Charles Walker Purcell Jr., whose 34-year career as a cameraman at WMAR-TV won him a string of awards in the documentary film category, died of kidney failure Friday at Reba's Home, a hospice care center in Parrish, Fla. He was 82. Mr. Purcell was born and raised in Baltimore and lived here until he retired in 1981. He and his wife, the former Thelma I. Forthuber, then moved to Florida. They were married nearly 63 years. A 1940 graduate of City College, Mr. Purcell worked briefly as copy boy at The Sun. In 1941, he enlisted in the Navy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2001
If you want to take a video you've shot with a standard analog camcorder and get it into your PC or post it online, you have a couple of choices. You can open your PC, install a video converter card and configure the software to make it run, which takes about the same amount of time as shooting a feature-length movie. Or you can try a couple of recently released products from Pinnacle Systems (http://www.pinnaclesys.com /start.asp) that are easy enough for kids to use to create a super-short bathtub version of "Titanic" without the anger and frustration that accompany some PC movie-making adventures.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
Charles Walker Purcell Jr., whose 34-year career as a cameraman at WMAR-TV won him a string of awards in the documentary film category, died of kidney failure Friday at Reba's Home, a hospice care center in Parrish, Fla. He was 82. Mr. Purcell was born and raised in Baltimore and lived here until he retired in 1981. He and his wife, the former Thelma I. Forthuber, then moved to Florida. They were married nearly 63 years. A 1940 graduate of City College, Mr. Purcell worked briefly as copy boy at The Sun. In 1941, he enlisted in the Navy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2002
NEW YORK - Since late May, three 35-millimeter movie cameras have been trained on Ground Zero from atop nearby buildings, each programmed to take a picture of the vast site every five minutes, night and day. By Sept. 11, they will be joined by three other cameras rigged to do the same. They will keep taking pictures - 288 a day - for at least the next seven years. The planned result is an extraordinary historical record of the rebirth of the World Trade Center site, one that the effort's sponsors hope will be displayed continuously at a museum, perhaps one that emerges on the site.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
We need conscious people, not an unconscious mass, ready to yield to any suggestion. Long live the consciousness of the pure who can see and hear! Down with the scented veil of kisses, murders, doves and conjuring tricks! - Dziga Vertov Dziga Vertov - my hero. That's the reaction I have whenever I watch Vertov's silent Soviet masterpiece, The Man With a Movie Camera (1929) - especially with the score by the amazing, three-man Alloy Orchestra that accompanies the film on the print to be shown tonight at the Walters Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2001
If you want to take a video you've shot with a standard analog camcorder and get it into your PC or post it online, you have a couple of choices. You can open your PC, install a video converter card and configure the software to make it run, which takes about the same amount of time as shooting a feature-length movie. Or you can try a couple of recently released products from Pinnacle Systems (http://www.pinnaclesys.com /start.asp) that are easy enough for kids to use to create a super-short bathtub version of "Titanic" without the anger and frustration that accompany some PC movie-making adventures.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 10, 2000
I ONCE DREADED the ordeal of the home movie camera, but I've come to appreciate its power. Sometime in the middle 1950s, my parents acquired a camera and light bar from Service Photo, a Greenmount Avenue store that had a candy jar with free samples. From that day forward, we were good customers. The camera -- I think we tortured two models -- became a guest at all the requisite family events, the Christmas mornings, the snow storms, the First Communions and family outings. It's all pretty tame stuff, interesting only if you knew the cast.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
For years, Charles J. Cignatta's "office" was the cockpit of chase planes high over the Chesapeake Bay, where he filmed the dips and rolls of aircraft going through their paces after emerging from the Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.Mr. Cignatta, who spent a nearly five-decade career with the manufacturer of airplanes and spacecraft, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Franklin Woods Center-Genesis Eldercare. The Essex resident was 85.Armed with his heavy Speed Graphic or Aeroflex movie camera, Mr. Cignatta photographed Martin Co. projects, from World War II-era bombers and seaplanes to jets and missiles and even the installation of a nuclear power plant at the South Pole.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2002
NEW YORK - Since late May, three 35-millimeter movie cameras have been trained on Ground Zero from atop nearby buildings, each programmed to take a picture of the vast site every five minutes, night and day. By Sept. 11, they will be joined by three other cameras rigged to do the same. They will keep taking pictures - 288 a day - for at least the next seven years. The planned result is an extraordinary historical record of the rebirth of the World Trade Center site, one that the effort's sponsors hope will be displayed continuously at a museum, perhaps one that emerges on the site.
SPORTS
September 10, 1991
Kuwaiti gymnast awaits wordAbdullhussain Abraheem was a big draw with the autograph-hungry teen-agers at the World Gymnastics Championships in Indianapolis.One of three male gymnasts from Kuwait, Abraheem was in his hometown of Kuwait City when Iraq invaded on Aug. 2, 1990. Abraheem and one of his four brothers, Moses, used a movie camera to film part of the invasion from a rooftop. Later, said Abraheem, the brothers acquired a couple of guns from members of the Kuwait resistance and carried out a brief hit-and-run assault.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 18, 1994
Maybe it's your brother-in-law or someone in the office. Maybe it's someone in the car pool or someone who's dating your daughter. But it's someone: A person who considers him- or herself intrinsically more interesting than you, whose life is so much more fascinating than yours, whose wit so much more powerful, and who seizes every second of every day to narrate their latest adventures.Uck. Terrible, no?Now imagine two of them -- with a movie camera -- and you have some idea of the horrors that lurk within "My Life's in Turnaround," which is one half of the double bill at the Charles this week, and a movie so piercingly vain it makes mere narcissism seem like strength of character.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.