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NEWS
By David Horsey | January 14, 2014
How much longer can Hollywood claim to be the movie capital of the world? Can the California legislature reverse the slide of film production away from Los Angeles simply by enhancing tax credits for the movie and TV industry or, one day, will the Oscars be presented in Atlanta or Toronto or New Orleans? Such questions grow more pertinent year by year. Lawmakers in Sacramento are even now mulling over a plan that would extend the current $100 million movie industry tax credit program that is set to terminate on July 1, 2017.
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NEWS
February 26, 2014
For a politician, the opportunity to bring jobs and economic prosperity to the public by subsidizing the production of the TV drama "House of Cards" in Maryland just sounds too good to pass up ( "Senator faults administration effort to keep 'House of Cards,'" Feb. 21). That's the kind of thing that elections are won on. When the politicians finally wake up to the reality that they have been handing more taxpayer funds to the movie industry - $15 million last year - than the industry puts back into the economy, they are shocked to get the movie people's extortion note: Pay up or we move on. " The made-for-TV film industry is nomadic and its jobs are temporary, low-wage jobs.
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NEWS
May 18, 2009
The Senator Theatre on York Road is the area's biggest-screen venue for first-run Hollywood movies. But despite an enthusiastic and loyal local following, the Senator has been hit hard by competition from newer, multiplex theaters offering a greater variety of entertainment fare, and for some time now the venerable Baltimore landmark, which serves as an anchor of the Belvedere Square community, has been struggling under an increasingly unsustainable burden...
NEWS
By David Horsey | January 14, 2014
How much longer can Hollywood claim to be the movie capital of the world? Can the California legislature reverse the slide of film production away from Los Angeles simply by enhancing tax credits for the movie and TV industry or, one day, will the Oscars be presented in Atlanta or Toronto or New Orleans? Such questions grow more pertinent year by year. Lawmakers in Sacramento are even now mulling over a plan that would extend the current $100 million movie industry tax credit program that is set to terminate on July 1, 2017.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,Special to the Sun | October 24, 2004
My favorite mode of education is the school of hard knocks. I am a novelist, and that is how novelists like to learn. There are two basic aspects of this preference, and they are, in ascending order of danger, the fact that novelists don't take advice easily and that they like to take chances. When you add Hollywood to this mix, you have all the elements of a conflagration. I must say, right from the beginning, that I should have known better, since I grew up in Hollywood, attended Hollywood High, and in the miserable childhood that seems to be crucial to the formation of the novelist's sensibility, I left home at 17 and moved in with the family of a friend.
FEATURES
By Diana Lundin and Diana Lundin,Los Angeles Daily News | February 28, 1994
Cody Cluff surveyed with satisfaction over the weekend the 30-by-30-foot white circus tent the Los Angeles city and county film offices pitched outside an international movie business trade show in Santa Monica, Calif.Inside the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, film commissions from around the world tried to grab a share at Location Expo '94 of what local officials call $1 billion a year in "runaway production."Los Angeles -- offered space city and county officials deemed inadequate for the center of the international movie business -- fought back, luring trade-show participants with a billboard declaring "L.A.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 30, 1990
ELLIS COHEN, Baltimore native son who made a name for himself as a television movie producer over the last decade, is branching out from Hollywood producer to Hollywood novelist. And publication this week of his first book, "Avenue of the Stars," co-written with Jina Bacarr, couldn't have come at a more opportune time.The fictional account of a ruthless Japanese businessman who takes over the last independent movie studio in Hollywood is hitting bookstores right on the heels of the announced sale Monday of MCA Inc., which owns Universal Studios, to Matsushita of Japan.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
For a politician, the opportunity to bring jobs and economic prosperity to the public by subsidizing the production of the TV drama "House of Cards" in Maryland just sounds too good to pass up ( "Senator faults administration effort to keep 'House of Cards,'" Feb. 21). That's the kind of thing that elections are won on. When the politicians finally wake up to the reality that they have been handing more taxpayer funds to the movie industry - $15 million last year - than the industry puts back into the economy, they are shocked to get the movie people's extortion note: Pay up or we move on. " The made-for-TV film industry is nomadic and its jobs are temporary, low-wage jobs.
FEATURES
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND ROBERT W. WELKOS and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND ROBERT W. WELKOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
CANNES, France -- Hoots of derision. Snickers at a key, climactic moment. And early negative reviews. None of it was a deterrent to Andres Steffens, who waited in line at 7 a.m. Wednesday outside the Grand Palais at the Cannes Film Festival to buy advance tickets for The Da Vinci Code. "I care what critics say -- it's part of my decision-making," said the 49-year-old from Kiel, Germany, adding that there are extenuating circumstances in this case that require two tickets no matter what the arbiters of culture have to say about it: "My girlfriend read the book."
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 24, 1993
"UNFORGIVEN," for which Clint Eastwood is apparently destined to be honored in the Academy Awards excesses next week, is the coldest movie I've seen since "Eskimo."The next coldest was "Pale Rider," a 1985 Eastwood oater about an avenging gunman raised from the grave by a little girl's prayers, unless I misunderstood the symbolism.The dominant color in both Eastwood movies was ice blue. While the sun occasionally came out in both, it was the gray, dead sun of a North Atlantic January.A friend in the movie business says maybe both shows were filmed way up in Canada, which might account for the frigid colors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Growing up in Annapolis, Tim and Trevor White were hardly inseparable. Each brother had his own set of friends and pursued his own interests: Trevor discovered a passion for film early on, while Tim seemed more adrift. But recently, a shared commitment to cinema has brought the pair closer than ever, as they work toward the release of their first full-length movie. "Jamesy Boy," shot in and around Baltimore over a five-week period that ended this month, stars Mary-Louise Parker, Ving Rhames and James Woods.
NEWS
May 18, 2009
The Senator Theatre on York Road is the area's biggest-screen venue for first-run Hollywood movies. But despite an enthusiastic and loyal local following, the Senator has been hit hard by competition from newer, multiplex theaters offering a greater variety of entertainment fare, and for some time now the venerable Baltimore landmark, which serves as an anchor of the Belvedere Square community, has been struggling under an increasingly unsustainable burden...
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | January 16, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- Now that it has conquered the online music business, Apple Inc. wants to do the same with online movie rentals. Apple announced at the opening of the Macworld Conference & Expo yesterday it will begin renting downloadable movies at its iTunes store for $2.99-$3.99. High-definition versions cost $3.99-$4.99. Users will have 24 hours to finish watching movies once they start. Apple also introduced what chief executive Steven P. Jobs said was the world's thinnest computer - a notebook PC that's only three-quarters of an inch at its thickest point and skinny enough to fit inside a manila interoffice envelope.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 30, 2007
HOLLYWOOD studios are said to be in a backslide, grappling with unhappy realities. Well, boy, oh boy, that's not the picture I got of Paramount Pictures when I lunched with Brad Grey who now runs things there. Brad and I go way back to his days as a Young Turk agent/manager with the (Bernie) Brillstein-Grey Agency. Now, he's a movie tycoon in the creative manner of a starmaker. (Well, maybe not exactly because times have changed so much!) But with Brad, the talent still comes first. He and I sat down for a catch-up at Michael's popular watering spot.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
James G. Robinson is probably best known as the producer of such films as Young Guns, Pacific Heights and Ace Ventura: Pet Detective. But the Maryland native who got his start on the docks and still owns a small waterfront firm in Baltimore, said his latest drama has been nothing like what he's made up in Hollywood. Robinson's company, Premiere Automotive Services Inc., has been embroiled in a four-year-old dispute with the port involving its lease of 6 acres owned by the state. This week, the legal back and forth started to look a little like On the Waterfront as nine armed state transportation police officers and port officials cut locks and climbed through a window at Robinson's warehouse, arrested a worker for trespassing and seized control of 170 farm tractors being repaired in the lot. "I don't believe what happened," said Robinson, from his Baltimore home.
FEATURES
By RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND ROBERT W. WELKOS and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ AND ROBERT W. WELKOS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
CANNES, France -- Hoots of derision. Snickers at a key, climactic moment. And early negative reviews. None of it was a deterrent to Andres Steffens, who waited in line at 7 a.m. Wednesday outside the Grand Palais at the Cannes Film Festival to buy advance tickets for The Da Vinci Code. "I care what critics say -- it's part of my decision-making," said the 49-year-old from Kiel, Germany, adding that there are extenuating circumstances in this case that require two tickets no matter what the arbiters of culture have to say about it: "My girlfriend read the book."
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | October 17, 1991
Gloom is everywhere. But sunshine may be just around the corner.That's film-industry talk. Hollywood loves to speak in cliches -- and in contradictions. Depending upon whom you listen to -- or whom you read -- the movie business either is or isn't in trouble.That it was a disappointing summer is undeniable -- Bruce Willis' "Hudson Hawk," Julia Roberts' "Dying Young" and Kathleen Turner's "V.I. Warshawski" didn't begin to meet critical or financial expectations. In fact, "Hudson Hawk," the season's biggest loser, so far has earned a paltry $16 million, compared to TC a budget estimated at between $48-$58 million.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 25, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:THE MAGAZINE RACK -- In the mid-summer rerun desert, a trio of ABC news shows offer some interesting fresh fare. Tonight, for example, an hour-long "Peter Jennings Reporting" special (at 8, Channel 13) takes a look at the Dance Theatre of Harlem. In addition to its focus on founder Arthur Mitchell, the show also addresses the broader question that can be applied to many fine arts organi-zations: How to get the money to survive? Also tonight (at 10), "Primetime Live" includes the nearby environs of Washington in a report on lead contamination of soil.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 26, 2006
Tomorrow, the first wave of what could be a movie revolution hits theaters across America. But not in Baltimore. Bubble, a working-class slice-of-life drama from famed director Steven Soderbergh and producers including dot.com/pro basketball impresario Mark Cuban, will be released simultaneously in movie theaters and on select television outlets tomorrow, then via DVD on Tuesday. It's the first in a planned series of simultaneous releases from 2929 Entertainment (owned by Cuban and his partner, Todd Wagner)
ENTERTAINMENT
By R. Kinsey Lowe and R. Kinsey Lowe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 21, 2005
HOLLYWOOD - Jeff Blake, the vice chairman of Sony Pictures Entertainment, summed it up this way: "The summer did not work out the way we hoped." Although he was talking about his own studio, his statement applied to the rest of Hollywood as well. Summer's not officially over, but much of the industry has written off what is traditionally one of the busiest stretches of the year: Despite a decades-long upward trend, the season's attendance is off about 10 percent from last year, and is at its lowest level since 2000.
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