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By SYLVIA BADGER | October 18, 1992
Baltimoreans celebrated Columbus Day in a variety of ways. For some, like former federal Judge Norman Ramsey, who retired to return to his former law firm Semmes, Bowen and Semmes as general counsel, and his wife, Tucky (owner of the destination management company Presenting Baltimore), it was a good excuse for a party.About 250 people attended their annual Columbus Day bash at the Engineers Club, an elegant site for a black-tie party.It was a gathering of movers and shakers that included U.S. Attorney Dick Bennett and his wife, Jane; Mary Ann and Peter Saar; Frances Booke; Judge Bob Watts and his wife, Jackie; Judge Ellen and Rich Hollander; Judy and Danny Brewster; Floraine and Leroy Applefeld; Lois and Howard Shofer; Rita and Tom Cinnamond; Willard and Lillian Hackerman; Kip Mandris; Barbara Blum; Doris and Nathan Patz; Rudy Miller and Chuck Allen; Brenda and Stuart Brooks; Joanne and Jim Miller; Sen. Barbara Mikulski; Clarisse Mechanic; Judge Mary Arabian; Rose and Richard Cernak; Sen. Paul and Christina Sarbanes; Marsha and Bill Jews; and Irene and Roy Kirby.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 21, 2009
If you're an Orioles fan - and I know you're out there somewhere - you're probably thinking the same thing I'm thinking right now. Who kidnapped the conservative, methodical, one-step-at-a-time Orioles president of baseball operations and replaced him with the nonstop Andy MacPhail who is making me wonder whether they ought to implement amphetamine testing for baseball front-office employees? There have been a couple of times this month when I haven't even finished sizing up one Orioles move before Baltimore Sun baseball beat writer Jeff Zrebiec or Dan Connolly is breaking the news on another (and ESPN is rushing to take credit for it)
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FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | December 8, 1995
The Columbus Center was turned into an art deco club for Loyola College's John Early Society holiday party. And since these are the movers and shakers who raise a lot of money for the college, the school throws a party for them during the holidays. President of Loyola Rev. Harold Ridley was there to receive each and every one of the more than 300 guests.Some of the John Early members at the festive gathering were chairman and director of James Keelty & Co. Joe Keelty and his guest, Ann Grieves; chairman and CEO of Crown Central Henry Rosenberg and his wife, Dottie; Dr. Frank Ayd and his wife, Rita; John and Mary Evelius, he's a senior partner with Gallagher, Evelius & Jones; Sig and Mary Hyman, he's president of S.M. Hyman Co.; Dick and Lois Hug, he's chairman of Environmental Elements Corp.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special To The Sun | June 1, 2008
When the disco music came on at the wedding of Damon Foreman's daughter last weekend, he and his wife, Mary Ellen Baker, busted out some slick dance moves that had the other guests applauding. Mo and Barbara Dutterer of Columbia spent their eight-hour drive on Memorial Day weekend listening to Amii Stewart's "Knock on Wood" and planning out a swing dance routine. And recently, Michael and Karen Schonfeld of Ellicott City hit the dance floor at a club in Las Vegas, showing off their swing dance combinations.
FEATURES
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,Los Angeles Times | February 14, 1993
Who's the hottest property in the record business?That's not an easy question, but with conglomerates betting zillions of dollars on it, the Los Angeles Times conducted some independent research.First, everyone -- from Michael Jackson to Pearl Jam -- was declared a free agent. Then 25 movers and shakers in the music business were called and asked: What acts would you sign?The issue wasn't favorite artists, but the ones that are likeliest to sell the most records through the remainder of the '90s.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | March 16, 1997
Nancy Hubble and Karen Bisbee won't make a move without carefully weighing the consequences.It took Nancy Hubble 35 years to make her first move, merging the Hubble Co. with W. H. C. Wilson & Co. It took another three before she and her daughter began to think of their future at the Roland Park firm.Only this time when Hubble and her daughter, Karen Bisbee, questioned their options last January the answer came swiftly and decisively.Now was the right time to end their six-year partnership with W. H. C. Wilson & Co. There was so much more business to lure out there.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 22, 1995
Now the movers and shakers of the Maryland Club get to decide whether to move or shake the Maryland Club.If the latest bombing makes Israelis quit on the deal with the PLO, Hamas wins.The Iowa Republican straw poll was a good guide to what can be expected in the Iowa Republican straw poll.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | January 9, 1994
DETROIT -- It was a tough week for Rocky Marval, the skating truck driver.He was orally blasted by his ex-partner, Calla Urbanski. He was trying to patch together a new partnership with Natasha Kuchiki. And he was angling for one last spot in the Winter Olympics.But yesterday, just when it looked like Marval and Natasha Kuchiki were about to finish third in pairs at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, another pothole appeared.The judges.In what had to be a skating first, Karen Courtland and Todd Reynolds fell three times, including once simultaneously, and were awarded third place and the final Olympic berth ahead of Kuchiki and Marval.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
IT IS unsettling for the world to lose King Hussein of Jordan. He has been a rock in the turbulent Middle East since 1952, the victim the assassins could not kill, the regime no coup could topple, in a kingdom as small as it was artificial.And he was a force for comparative good, usually (not always) a friend of U.S. policy, an Arab leader with whom Israeli prime ministers talked, an autocrat whose fitful concessions to democracy were ahead of other Arab regimes.King Hussein's absence is mentally destabilizing to other players in the Middle East, including Washington, that took his presence for granted.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Mr. Rasmussen is a librarian at The Sun | March 15, 1992
THE STORY OF THE NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY.Robert L. Gunnarsson.Greenberg Publishing.189 pages. $39.95. Marylanders used to thinking that the B&O Railroad was the only major railroad construction project during the 1820s in the state have forgotten the Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad. The B&S became the Northern Central Railway and finally wound up as a far-flung line of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, linking Baltimore with Sodus Point on Lake Ontario.Today, part of the railroad is on the verge of becoming the new Central Light Rail line, which will open this spring and eventually link Hunt Valley with Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By HEATHER GEHLERT and HEATHER GEHLERT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- David Wolf's passion is constitutional law; his hobby is collecting. So when the Washington lawyer discovered a listing on eBay that would round out one of his collections, he forked over $2,100. It was for a limited-edition, 8-inch poly-resin bobblehead of the late U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. "I don't know if I can explain it," said Wolf. "I'm obsessive." Wolf also paid more than $800 for a Justice John Paul Stevens bobblehead after he realized that the one he owned was missing the small golf club in the figurine's right hand.
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
There was a moment when Gary Vikan was sitting on the 12th floor of the Legg Mason building last fall looking at a dizzying array of charts and numbers. The charts were designed to convey the feelings and attitudes outsiders had of the great city where he lived and worked. But he was dumbstruck. Apparently all the people who lived within 250 miles of Baltimore and had never been here weren't particularly impressed. Those who had, however, were quick to give Baltimore top marks. The divergence of opinions was such that even officials of Longwoods International, the tourism research firm presenting the data, said they had rarely seen such a stark divide.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
THE VANS THAT pulled up at 1 State Circle last week were adorned with a blue-and-red logo that has become a familiar sight at state buildings everywhere. The trucks belonged to Office Movers, the company owned by John Kane, chairman of the state Republican Party. Since the election of Maryland's first Republican governor in 36 years, Kane -- who was briefly a candidate for the office last year before Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. entered the race -- has continued to do a brisk business shuttling computers, desks, chairs and filing cabinets from one state office to another.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
IT IS unsettling for the world to lose King Hussein of Jordan. He has been a rock in the turbulent Middle East since 1952, the victim the assassins could not kill, the regime no coup could topple, in a kingdom as small as it was artificial.And he was a force for comparative good, usually (not always) a friend of U.S. policy, an Arab leader with whom Israeli prime ministers talked, an autocrat whose fitful concessions to democracy were ahead of other Arab regimes.King Hussein's absence is mentally destabilizing to other players in the Middle East, including Washington, that took his presence for granted.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1999
There he was last night, the center of attention at a high-rolling VIP reception, sipping a beer (on ice in a wine glass), looking proud as punch as he rambled on about his 90-year-old stepgrandfather, Jerry Church, who had come up from Lake Okeechobee in central Florida to see him -- Gov. Parris N. Glendening -- celebrate his inauguration.The heavy hitters who had paid big bucks to attend the pre-ball reception came up to offer their congratulations, touch the hem of his tuxedo, make their presence known.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1997
The Gunpowder River is flecked with sunlight, wild roses and lilies droop over the bank, condensation rises like breath from the water. It's a scene firmly in the fond, moist grip of summer.A place where thoughts can turn to fishing.Harriet Legum is ready to do just that. But first: She trudges gamely uphill, brushing away insects, on a mission to transform the park's restroom for her friends, who are gathering for a morning of fly-fishing.She places a plastic shell of fish-shaped soaps and a stack of hand towels next to the rust-stained sink.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | May 3, 1991
MOVERS AND SHAKERS: Finally, there's some real action for the homeless. At a Center Club breakfast this week, Lou Grasmick, Baltimore's fund-raising rainmaker, unveiled plans to raise at least $250,000 for Maryland's homeless.He rounded up many of the state's movers and shakers, who have agreed to sell $10 raffle tickets for the "House with a Heart" between now and the drawing Oct. 26. The winner will move into a $200,000 Ryland home located in the Seven Oaks Development in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Holly Selby | May 12, 1996
Ever notice that the people who seem the most highly motivated personally and professionally often are the ones who also have enough energy left over after a long day at the office to work out regularly? We did. And we wondered what gave them that extra boost.Turns out, it's not what, but who.You've got it. In offices, home gyms and fitness centers, many of Baltimore's movers and shakers are paying for an infusion of enthusiasm: They are hiring personal fitness trainers.A fitness trainer's primary function is, of course, to develop a safe, effective workout for his client.
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